Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Who plants trees?

Messages posted to thread:
JusPassin 13-May-22
AK Pathfinder 13-May-22
George D. Stout 13-May-22
olddogrib 13-May-22
Jeff Durnell 13-May-22
JusPassin 13-May-22
lowrider 13-May-22
lowrider 13-May-22
Ross 13-May-22
Bjrogg 13-May-22
bfisherman11 13-May-22
David McLendon 13-May-22
Danielb 13-May-22
vikingbear 13-May-22
Jegs.mi 13-May-22
rbatect 13-May-22
Thumper-tx 13-May-22
Phil 14-May-22
JusPassin 14-May-22
Jeff Durnell 14-May-22
Hawkeye 14-May-22
Tim Finley 14-May-22
Bjrogg 14-May-22
Nitro1970 14-May-22
Tedd 14-May-22
Tedd 14-May-22
Riverwolf 14-May-22
Catskills 15-May-22
Cotton 15-May-22
JusPassin 15-May-22
brush ape 15-May-22
Basinboy 15-May-22
Fisher 15-May-22
pondscum2 16-May-22
Bsmitty27 16-May-22
ottertails 17-May-22
Basinboy 17-May-22
LIVINtheLIFE 17-May-22
txdm 17-May-22
Archre167 17-May-22
R.grider 17-May-22
R.grider 22-May-22
Altek 22-May-22
kstout 23-May-22
Altitude Sickness 23-May-22
From: JusPassin
Date: 13-May-22




So I convinced my dad to sign a 30 acre parcel of land into a perpetual trust. Only direct descendants are members. It had about 10 acres of corn ground, the rest timber with a spring fed creek through it.

That was in 2006, since then we took the corn ground and planted the whole thing to timber. Some areas didn't make it so this week I've been out planting a couple hundred more trees. Cedars, northern pecan, and black oak.

Hand planting trees in 90 degree heat is about more than this old man can handle. Keeps the deer and turkey happy though.

From: AK Pathfinder
Date: 13-May-22




Planting trees at our age just means we're thinking of the next generation. I've put probably 20 trees on our property over the last 8 years to improve the variety and for the wildlife. It's a good thing to do.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 13-May-22




If you have good woods nearby, and squirrels, you likely have willing participants in tree planting, especially for oak and hickory. :) Maples send their seeds via samaras that can helicopter for quite a distance themselves. It's good plant trees for the next generation, and hopefully they will understand the need.

From: olddogrib
Date: 13-May-22




Yea, in my younger days I toyed with the idea of planting a bunch of apple or persimmon trees. Thought too long. What is the sayin'...think long, think wrong, lol!

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 13-May-22




I like grafting, planting, and tending fruit trees. I grafted some heirloom species from my grandfather's orchard to semidwarf rootstock to preserve them because the trees are very old and dying. I planted some here at my place and some up at camp, plus some chestnut trees. Those up at camp didn't survive the deer and elk. I tried twice. The ground there is terrible so they grew very slowly, and ultimately got destroyed by the critters I was planting them for. Done with that game.

The trees here are doing good. There are two more trees over there I'd like to graft and bring here so I'll probably do one more round of grafting next year, then I'll be out of room.

If you plant semidwarf trees they grow big enough to be out of the deer's reach, but can start producing apples after just a few years.

From: JusPassin
Date: 13-May-22




Never too late to make it better for the future. My grandfather planted 1000's of black walnut trees on on timber ground back in the 60's.

From: lowrider
Date: 13-May-22




Two years ago planted 200 sawtooth 25 persimmon and 25 chinquapin.

From: lowrider
Date: 13-May-22




Should read sawtooth oaks. About 20 years ago I planted 100 sawtooth oaks that 46 survived from barefoot seedlings and are now over 30 feet tall.

From: Ross Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 13-May-22




My Pa , my brothers me and many friends have planted thousands of trees in the past 30years . Mostly white pine red pine , white oak , burr oak ,walnuts apple , hickory and white spruce . We aren’t planting as much past couple years . We did manage to get in 100 white oak and a few apples . It is fun and rewarding !

From: Bjrogg
Date: 13-May-22




I’ve planted 1,000’s. This is the first spring I haven’t planted any in a long time.

Bjrogg

Ps with all the dead ash there’s lots of space for them. Just really hard climbing over all the dead trees to plant them.

From: bfisherman11 Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 13-May-22




I planted 60 trees and 15 various bushes last week. I've had my property for 20 years and have always planted something each year. Couple years ago I planted 10 Chestnut. They are still growing. I've got them in tubes.

I've got about 50 White Oaks coming and that will be the extent of my planting this year.

Yeah, I plant trees. I like improving my land and making it mine. I also lost a bunch of Ash. Most of my older trees were Ash so I want to plant good trees to replace them.

Bill

From: David McLendon
Date: 13-May-22




Gray Squirrels are planting Pin Oaks all over my backyard.

From: Danielb Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 13-May-22




I've planted 1,000s over the years. The first two weeks of April, last month, I hand planted 400 more. The ones I have the best luck with have been purchased from the state nursery.

From: vikingbear
Date: 13-May-22




Yes I plant trees .Mostly fruit trees. Apple cherry, plum.pear walnut and peach. Grand kids love to come out and enjoy the fruits of my labour. Also have lots of deer and some trophy deer. I find it very satisfying .

From: Jegs.mi Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 13-May-22




My grandpa always told me the best time to plant fruit trees is twenty years ago. I planted 2 peach and twenty pines last year. Two plum's and two cherry this year. It is very enjoyable to watch them grow.

From: rbatect
Date: 13-May-22




Thanks for making things greener

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 13-May-22




I try to plant some trees every year. So far , in varying numbers I have planted native persimmon, Japanese persimmon. Apple, Mexican plum, chestnut, sawtooth oak, burr oak, various pears, pecan,and metley plum.

From: Phil
Date: 14-May-22




In 2009 I planted 200 Taxus Bacatta .... they should be ready for bow making some time around 2250

From: JusPassin
Date: 14-May-22




Well, the initial planting in 2007 took 8000 trees, so I guess I've done my part. Got 50 left to do today. I know I'll never see them mature.

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 14-May-22




The trees I'm taking scions from to graft were mature full sized apple trees when my grandfather bought the place in 1948, so they should be about 100 years old now. They've seen better days but still produce most years. I wonder how many generations of deer have fed under them. I remember picking apples there with grandpap and dad in the late 60's early 70's. Ahhh, that fall orchard smell! I was there yesterday and found a few more morels under them. They're covered in blossoms, again.

From: Hawkeye Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 14-May-22




Jegs,

The version of that saying I used in my business days in a speech says:

"The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The second best time is TODAY!"

From: Tim Finley Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-May-22




My son and I have hand planted 2000 tress in the last few years in a coolee on our land . We planted cedar, juniper, scotch pine, and several other variety of long needle pines . This year there will be more of the variety that looks the best and we'll start planting a bunch of willows in the bottom of the three draws . My son and grandson will have great hunting in about 10 or 12 years .

From: Bjrogg
Date: 14-May-22

Bjrogg's embedded Photo



I planted these in spring of 1994

I started planting in 1984 and have planted some almost every year since.

I alway heard that you at the same time plant two just the right distance apart and in the perfect spot for a hammock.

Bjrogg

From: Nitro1970
Date: 14-May-22




New blood has moved in around me and they've pretty much cut all their trees making me wish I had enough foresight to plant my little bit of acreage in oaks long years ago.

From: Tedd
Date: 14-May-22




Yes. A lot of them. And it has cost a lot of $ over the years. But I can't stop. Trying to get some chestnuts to production age. There are a lot of ways for a tree to get killed, including my own mower! This year I started 50 chestnuts from seed. It is much cheaper that way. So far they look good. The Alliance for the Chesapeake has us slated for a planting in the spring of 23. They will plant thousands of trees on slopes, ditches and riparian buffers for us. I need to stay on top of my invasive until they get here. Conservation programs hate invasives as much as I do!

From: Tedd
Date: 14-May-22




Yes. A lot of them. And it has cost a lot of $ over the years. But I can't stop. Trying to get some chestnuts to production age. There are a lot of ways for a tree to get killed, including my own mower! This year I started 50 chestnuts from seed. It is much cheaper that way. So far they look good. The Alliance for the Chesapeake has us slated for a planting in the spring of 23. They will plant thousands of trees on slopes, ditches and riparian buffers for us. I need to stay on top of my invasive until they get here. Conservation programs hate invasives as much as I do!

From: Riverwolf
Date: 14-May-22




Love planting trees & life;)

Good on you gents that take to planting a well rounded property for Wild"LIFE". I wish all land owners would do the same, and practice "Reforestation"! You gents in the east...Remember the Beech trees in your planting. I call them the All Giving tree....They give/provide shade , dens , food , and Beauty through all stages of life and well after death. For you squirrel hunters...The beautiful Beech are the trees to hunt early . look-listen for the beech nut casings pointing the way ;)

From: Catskills
Date: 15-May-22




Hawkeye, that saying is so true.

I have always planted fruit trees: peach, cherry, apple, pear.

Property is loaded with maple, ash ,disappearing now : ( cherry.

But I am hankering to plant some variety of oak, and I know I'd best hurry if I want to see any results.

From: Cotton
Date: 15-May-22




I plant between 25 and 100 seedlings every year on our 20 acres. The DNR has a sale every spring where we can buy them at a reasonable price and it’s become a Springtime tradition with me. The deer are tough on some varieties but they never get them all. I’ve planted White Oaks, White, Norway and Scotch Pines, Black Cherry, Mountain Ash,and Choke Cherry. This year it’s Red Oaks! I may plant for the next generation but I certainly get a lot of pleasure from the act of planting them and also watching them grow. Cotton

From: JusPassin
Date: 15-May-22




LOL, I love seeing this, and have to wonder how many of the "anti's" spend their treasure and sweat to enhance the future. Way to go gentlemen.

From: brush ape Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-May-22




As many of you, I've planted 1000,s through the years. The first trees I planted I was paid 1 pennie for each one, Those were much different times. The pines I planted in my highschool years here on the farm, I've thined for pulp first cutting and 2 log thinning cuts. I now only plant species that are not oaks as almost all my beautiful oaks have died from oak wilt.This year, Maples, Hackbarry, and tulip popular. I've been trying to root some big tooth aspen. Such fun, takes time at 72 yrs.

From: Basinboy
Date: 15-May-22

Basinboy's embedded Photo



I’ve planted hundreds, mostly on public land near my home. Still growing trees to plant. It’s an obsession I’d say :)

From: Fisher
Date: 15-May-22




We planted about 1,000 apple, some pear, and some peach. Late blossom here this year.

From: pondscum2
Date: 16-May-22




been moving sawtooth oaks. they are officially an "invasive species" here, but TWRA has planted them in places too. persimmon trees take years to drop fruit, but deer love them. apple trees nice, but bears are tough on them. want some blight-proof chestnuts...still a mite pricey when i can find them.

From: Bsmitty27
Date: 16-May-22




The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.

The next best is TODAY!

Ive planted over 7000 trees on my property over the last 15 years, started a little 2 acre orchard 5 years ago, added another 20 apple trees to it this morning. Every tree was planted with the szme shovel. I love getting out in the dirt.

The summers I spent tree planting in college, proved more valuable than I ever expected.

From: ottertails
Date: 17-May-22




Well I knew I couldn't be the only one. Impressed by how many so far have... but not really surprised. On my old property I planted well over a hundred Black walnut seeds from trees already on my land...2 years to germinate, maybe 15-18 took. Toughest specie to grow from my experience. I've also bought nursery trees such as mountain ash, several varieties, hybrids of Suger maples for their beauty around my house. I did plant some apple, crabapple and pear but the deer demolished them. Planted weeping willows around our pond, grew super fast.

Wish I had the land to do it all over again.

From: Basinboy
Date: 17-May-22

Basinboy's embedded Photo



This is so true! God Bless you all for giving to the future generations

From: LIVINtheLIFE
Date: 17-May-22




We own just over 10 acres. About 3 acres cleared for the property, the rest is timber with a beaver pond on the south end. Mostly tamarac, white pine, poplar and Jack pine. Every year we plant a few more in our cleared land, apple, flowering crab, pine, spruce, and a couple oak this year. And some hickory later. Some don’t make the Canadian winters at first but others do just fine if we can keep the deer off them. Doing our part the best we can even at a young age.

From: txdm
Date: 17-May-22




I live in the south and I've planted lots of mulberry trees on my 8 acres. They grow fast and make good bow wood, and they also produce fruit. The downside is the pollen is extremely bad for some folks.

From: Archre167
Date: 17-May-22




I help plant 500 every year on my buddies farm to hopefully make more cover for all the habitat lost in the past 50 years there.

From: R.grider
Date: 17-May-22




When i bought my 40 acres in 1993, I noticed I had very few oaks, and no turkeys. I have planted a couple thousand oaks, 4 varieties, and several hundred sycamores. I planted in rows in

From: R.grider
Date: 22-May-22




The one about never sit in their shade is not that true. Everything i planted in the past 15 years are more than big enough to sit in the shade of, and they are oaks. They were planted as seedlings, in full sun, moist , good soil, and mulched and mowed around. Some have trunks 14” in diameter, and 30 feet tall. Been sitting in their shade within less than 10 years of planting them. Its worth it!

From: Altek
Date: 22-May-22




Planting and maintaining trees/woodlots is a labor of love and hard work, nice to see there still are those who believe in the value of not developing what they own (A rare bird now). Besides the enjoyment and environmental benefits of planting (and putting aside the maintenance costs for awhile...no need to go there and spoil all the fun, lol) the tax advantages of forested/undeveloped property can also be a perk (in some states land kept in tree growth has much lower taxes). Of course, not every piece of land lends itself well to planting trees particularly if remote or in challenging terrain. And not everyone can afford property that isn't already 'lived on'(a nice way of saying an asphalt jungle). For those who do have land but that for whatever reason can't plaint/maintain their favorite species on it (or on land where favorite species simple aren't hardy enough to survive over the long term) perhaps the best (and cheapest) management tool is to keep the existing forest in an uneven-aged status by creating patched openings that allow sun to penetrate and invites native species to plant themselves, which creates diversity, an attractive landscape/habitat for both wildlife and flora. But be careful what you plant, invasives can quickly take over an area and not in a good way.

Good thread.

From: kstout
Date: 23-May-22




I've planted many over the years. mainly pine, and spruce for deer, and rabbit cover. I now have treestands in several spruce trees I planted back in 1978.

From: Altitude Sickness
Date: 23-May-22




I do, and it’s amazing to look back at trees planted years before. How much they have grown. It’s like a time capsule for me.





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