Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Weight gain

Messages posted to thread:
Keith 16-Jan-22
[email protected] 16-Jan-22
Keith 16-Jan-22
bluesman 17-Jan-22
SB 17-Jan-22
Tim Baker 17-Jan-22
Jeff Durnell 17-Jan-22
Riverwolf 17-Jan-22
longbow1968 17-Jan-22
Arvin 17-Jan-22
Arvin 17-Jan-22
Tim Baker 18-Jan-22
Keith 18-Jan-22
Arvin 19-Jan-22
Keith 27-Jan-22
From: Keith Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 16-Jan-22




I made an osage flat bow this last summer Finished out at 56#s at 28, 65". It has a paraffin finish.

I strung it up today and shot it in the basement today where it was stored. I thought, man this bow seems heavy. I weighed it, and it is now 60#. Bow profile has not apparently changed.

The basement is around 55 degrees, plus with the Minnesota dry winters.

Is this common to gain this much weight? Or was the bow not completely dry?

If I reduce the limbs and reseal with wax, do I risk messing up the bow since it is already shot in?

From: [email protected]
Date: 16-Jan-22




Did you measure it on the same scale

From: Keith Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 16-Jan-22




Yes. Same scale and tiller tree.

The only difference is relative temperature and humidity.

From: bluesman
Date: 17-Jan-22




I built a hickory selfbow in Oregon , it was 100 degrees for two days and the high 90’s for the last two . Put it on the scale finished , it was 57# . Took it back to Alberta , a friend shot it as his draw length was similar , he commented that it felt more than 57# . We put it on the scale and it was 63# . It was dryer in Alberta . The bow was sealed in Oregon . The stave had been properly dried before the build . Now I live in BC , it’s generally more humid . I think it’s a tad lighter than 63# now but I don’t have a scale here . I think they can change , others on here with more experience might be able to give you a definitive answer .

From: SB
Date: 17-Jan-22




I had that a lot with Hickory bows,regardless how well they were sealed.

From: Tim Baker
Date: 17-Jan-22




Cold wood is stiffer than warm wood. Recently tested the stiffness of a slat of wood at 32f then 75f, sealed in plastic to prevent moisture content change. A weight change of a several % resulted. I'm doing the test again to confirm then will report.

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 17-Jan-22




Even if they're dry/seasoned, they can gain or lose a few pounds depending on the humidity of the environment they're kept in. Houses can get very dry in the winter. Down around 20% rh.

You won't hurt it by sanding a couple of pounds off of the belly. Just keep in mind it might go the other way in the 'wet season'.

From: Riverwolf
Date: 17-Jan-22




I'm no bowyer l^) but like Tim stated, cold wood warm wood variance in density . Using winter spliting for comparison. Colder it gets the more solid/dense the wood becomes as the fibers are locked tighter by the chilled/frozen moisture within.........least in my findings with wood in general.

From: longbow1968
Date: 17-Jan-22




Very interesting, thanks for sharing.

From: Arvin
Date: 17-Jan-22




Probably was not completely dry when you finished it. And yes cold weather will make them fell like they have gained weight. But it should be dry now in that dry conditions. Retiller and I guess you will be fine. Also Osage selfbows will get spongIs in 98* weather with high humidity. Arvin

From: Arvin
Date: 17-Jan-22




Probably was not completely dry when you finished it. And yes cold weather will make them fell like they have gained weight. But it should be dry now in that dry conditions. Retiller and I guess you will be fine. Also Osage selfbows will get spongIs in 98* weather with high humidity. Arvin

From: Tim Baker
Date: 18-Jan-22




If a bow is weighed when warm but tested when cold its recorded arrow speed per pound will be substantially higher than actual, and vice versa.

From: Keith Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 18-Jan-22




The stave was around 10 years old, so certainly was dry. But I suspect summer humidity was a factor, even though I used a heat gun and a caul for limb profile.

What I should do is put it in the garage tonight and weigh it in a couple days when we have a predicted -10 coming on Thursday. ;-)

From: Arvin
Date: 19-Jan-22




Please report back to with results. Arvin

From: Keith Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 27-Jan-22




Temperature was about 5 in the garage, so I put on the scale and now the bow weighed 63#.

The bow actually took about an additional 1 inch set. It had about a 1 inch set to begin with.

I planned on bringing the weight down anyway, so I heat treated in a caul to remove the set.





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