Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Lets talk all things microflite arrows

Messages posted to thread:
Broadheads&Brass 20-Sep-21
Nemophilist 20-Sep-21
Bluefeather 20-Sep-21
Casekiska 20-Sep-21
DantheMan 20-Sep-21
John Sullins 20-Sep-21
M60gunner 20-Sep-21
Jon Stewart 20-Sep-21
Scoop 20-Sep-21
Gifford 21-Sep-21
Greg D 21-Sep-21
Batman 21-Sep-21
Viper 21-Sep-21
Riverwolf 21-Sep-21
cueman 21-Sep-21
the Black Spot 21-Sep-21
Will tell 21-Sep-21
Riverwolf 21-Sep-21
Dan Jones 21-Sep-21
mangonboat 21-Sep-21
782GearUSMC 21-Sep-21
George D. Stout 21-Sep-21
Downcanyon 21-Sep-21
Scoop 21-Sep-21
Downcanyon 21-Sep-21
Phil Magistro 21-Sep-21
M60gunner 21-Sep-21
Tembo62 21-Sep-21
Krag 21-Sep-21
Broadheads&Brass 21-Sep-21
Broadheads&Brass 21-Sep-21
Dan Jones 21-Sep-21
Rocky 21-Sep-21
shade mt 22-Sep-21
George D. Stout 22-Sep-21
RD 22-Sep-21
From: Broadheads&Brass Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 20-Sep-21




Hey Everyone, I found some old microflite arrows. Lets talk about them. First off anyone know where I can get some point inserts ? I have some number 5-8's Anyone know which size of inserts will work for them. Also was about the nock end inserts for the glue on nocks. Also lets see some photo's of them or old Ad's and so on !

Thxs

From: Nemophilist
Date: 20-Sep-21

Nemophilist's embedded Photo



From: Bluefeather
Date: 20-Sep-21




I don't know much about them either, but here recently I found 6 matching #7's with Bear greenness mounted on them. They were made by Weaknecht Archery from Kutztown, Pa. They are too short for my draw but I'll pass them on to somebody.

From: Casekiska
Date: 20-Sep-21




I used to use Micro-Flites back in the sixties for hunting. If I remember correctly they were no. 9 size. Always liked 'em. Does anyone remember the gray shaft Micro-Flites? Rumor has it they were "seconds" off the production line and the acceptable specification tolerance level was not as tight as the 1st. quality. Ah yes, Micro-Flites, the name brings back memories.

From: DantheMan
Date: 20-Sep-21




Anyone here familiar with the Robin hood arrows. Also a fiberglass.

From: John Sullins
Date: 20-Sep-21




I really liked those arrows. Used them to kill groundhogs back in the day. Later in life I began collecting them. I was able to make up two complete sets, every shaft from 0 -12. I crested them all alike and used real turkey feathers to fletch them. I made a nice wood display rack for each set. I framed a Micro Flite shaft chart for each rack. I gave one to a friend and kept the other set for a long time before selling it. Those arrows were the "carbons" of those days. They were tough but had to be inspected if you hit a rock or something else hard. Great arrows!

From: M60gunner
Date: 20-Sep-21




I bought a doz from the archery store in Joliet, IL back in 1974. Was a step up from the woodies I had been using. They had vanes and so I found out about raised arrow rests the hard way. The last off them are in the bottom of Oak Creek near Sedona, AZ. trying my hand at shooting carp. They tended to explode when hitting rocks or brick walls. Might try putting a “wanted” post for those components. Mine are long gone.

From: Jon Stewart
Date: 20-Sep-21

Jon Stewart's embedded Photo



From: Scoop Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 20-Sep-21




Yellow number 11s were elk arrows for several in our club in the ‘60s. We wanted weight and penetration back then before it became a “thing.” Woods in POC were used for everything else. The micro-flites dropped about like tossing an eight pound rock, but they did take some elk. They were stiff ones.

From: Gifford
Date: 21-Sep-21




Dug out my old Micro Flite shafts and forgot what the spine was. Thanks to you I know now. They are the old orange #4. Back in business for the light weight target bow.

From: Greg D
Date: 21-Sep-21




Does anyone know what a 30” #8 would weigh? Thanks

From: Batman
Date: 21-Sep-21




I am not EXACTLY sure who made the Micro-Flights but I wish that they could be brought back! AMAZING ARROWS!

From: Viper
Date: 21-Sep-21




Dan -

I used the Robinhood Archery black fiberglass arrows when I did longbow demos in the late 70's early 80's. Still have a dozen or two. IIRC correctly was using x7 from a 65# LB.

The resin they used wasn't as good as the Microflights, but they still held up well.

Viper out.

From: Riverwolf
Date: 21-Sep-21




Shot a few in my youth(I believe they were, as they were a beautiful yellow color. Reminded me of bamboo)....Loved the looks of them. Never got to shoot many . They were my Best buds dad's arrows ;)Anyone have info on how long and who actually manufactured them ?

From: cueman
Date: 21-Sep-21




Browning purchased Silex rod building in CA around 1961. They used that technology to build the Micro-flight arrows along with some of the best selling fishing rods of all time. They made arrows till some time in the 70's and sold Silex rods to Abu- Garcia in mid 80's or early 90's.

From: the Black Spot
Date: 21-Sep-21




Greg D, they should be around 400-420 grains

From: Will tell
Date: 21-Sep-21




Shakespeare made microflites that looked like the fiberglass they used on their Wonderrod fly poles.

From: Riverwolf
Date: 21-Sep-21




I have an older Eagle claw feather-lite fishing pool that looks a lot like the old arrows I remember in color of my youth . Its yellowish glass ......

From: Dan Jones
Date: 21-Sep-21




I had some gray painted Microflite #8 arrows from Feline Archery in Greensburg, Pa back in the late 1960's. The gray shafts were cheaper and were sold by Feline as Microflite seconds. After some use the gray paint wore off near the point revealing a yellow shaft beneath. I also remember Feline selling an unpainted brown fiberglass shaft that I believe was said to be a Microflite second. Both types were heavy but darn near indestructible.

From: mangonboat
Date: 21-Sep-21




I still shoot MicroFlites, but I also shoot just about everything else, too. I like them because they are consistent in spine and weight from shaft to shaft, easy to fletch, tough and durable and the design spreads the mass of your arrow consistently over the length of the shaft, which makes for easier tuning. The down sides are that each size requires a separate point and nock adapter and the front end of the shaft splinters and expands around the point upon impact with a rock.

From: 782GearUSMC
Date: 21-Sep-21




Ah, the ole Micro-Flite shafts. Damn good arrow shaft. What was it said about the old fiberglass arrows "They're either straight or broken?"

Killed several deer with those shafts. One evening I dropped a 245# 8-point buck with a loaded Micro-Flite. At 15-17 yards, using a #8 mounted with a 125 grain 6-blade Wasp shot from an 45# (51# at my DL) American Archery "Cheetah," I dropped him like a bad habit.

He had dropped at the shot and the shot hit him in the spine and drove that Wasp fully into his spine. He was trying to get up, and not knowing how fatal the initial shot was, I drove one through his heart. It was a partial pass-through and the head was sticking out the opposite side. After all that abuse to the shafts, neither shaft was damaged.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 21-Sep-21




I still have a few...very few since I use them mostly for stumping and they do tend to mushroom after awhile. I do foot them with large diameter aluminum and that helps. Like most composite shafts, they will crush on the sides so that's a concern to be noted. I think they look really cool on a bow quiver with some nice barred fletching...:))))). They are hard to find though so not practical to use them for everyday shooting or hunting, although they make a great hunting arrow...lots of inherent mass as they are.

They are versatile as spine goes, and normally with a 50# bow you can shoot both 7's and 8's with good flight.

From: Downcanyon
Date: 21-Sep-21




I have a bunch of new AcroFlte shafts (better than microflights in my opinion) if anybody wants to swap for them

From: Scoop Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 21-Sep-21

Scoop's embedded Photo



I grabbed a handful of Micro-Flite 11s out of the old "to repair" box from the 1960s. Apparently the fletching glue left a little to be desired. It may have been a Bohning product, but not sure. Weight with 125 grain tips was 680 grains; without tips 550.

After looking at the chart above, we may have been a bit stiff for 60-ish lb. bows!

From: Downcanyon
Date: 21-Sep-21




This was the archery shop I grew up with as a kid. He sold Acroflite fiberglass arrows all over the world I bought a bunch of the shafts after they closed up.

https://www.thefreelibrary.com/SI+take s+a+look+at+Arrow+Manufacturing+Inc.%3 a+25+years+of+making+and...-a07712045

From: Phil Magistro
Date: 21-Sep-21

Phil Magistro's embedded Photo



I can still clearly remember the day I had enough money saved to buy 6 Microflites at Hornick's Hardware in Johnstown, PA.

More recently I used to have about 8 dozen of them. Kept wanting to shoot them mostly for sentimental reasons but I just wasn't satisfied so I sold all but a few.

The ones pictured here ( other than the carbons on either end) are all 8's.

From: M60gunner
Date: 21-Sep-21




Last I read about 20 years ago now the machines used to make the MicroFlights ended up being sold to an outfit making tent poles for backpacking tents. Before Gordon’s Glass moved out of CA we used to go to the factory and buy shafts in 3 doz lots. Shooting them out of a Jennings compound they didn’t last long when they hit anything real solid.

From: Tembo62
Date: 21-Sep-21




My dad had a bunch of microflights back in the 70's....wonder where they are now?

From: Krag
Date: 21-Sep-21




I got a half dozen #7's when I bought my Black Bear RC in '73. Shot a woodchuck with one at about 5ft - could only see the head and neck on the other side of the big oak tree I was standing next to. Sounded like a .22 going off when he snapped it in half going back into the unseen hole. Kept that splintered back half for a while but lost the chuck and the Greenie.

From: Broadheads&Brass Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 21-Sep-21

Broadheads&Brass's embedded Photo



How do the graphlex shafts compare to the M.F's ? I have never had any of the graphlex.

From: Broadheads&Brass Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 21-Sep-21

Broadheads&Brass's embedded Photo



From: Dan Jones
Date: 21-Sep-21




I had a half dozen gray Graphlex shafts in the early 80's. I only shot them a few times before one of them mysteriously self- destructed - it just sort of collapsed or lost structural integrity or went limp - on a shot. It and the other Graphlex arrows immediately went in the trash.

From: Rocky
Date: 21-Sep-21




Still have a dozen #8s that I shoot occasionally.

From: shade mt
Date: 22-Sep-21




That brings back memories...#8s and cedars ,super hilbre broadheads...in a quiver without a hood.

Wife was watching an old TV program...commented with a sigh... "Those were the best days..wish we could go back"

I said... "Nobody stopping us"

Same goes for archery hunting...if you can find them..the old micro flights still work like they always did.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 22-Sep-21




Agree with shade mt. They were tough arrows but they were much more tolerant of spine than are carbon, and of course the inherent mass weight made them quieter from the get-go off the bow. If they were available, I would buy them over any carbon arrow in a heartbeat. I still have three of them that are usable but alas those will be gone by next year I guess. They do show up on Ebay now and then and that's where I usually get them.

From: RD
Date: 22-Sep-21




The pro shop owner where I bought my first "real" bow sold me a used bow for $20 less than a new one so I could afford microflite arrows, that was in 1965. He used to sell them on toughness, He would go outside around the back of his brick building and shoot them into it to show their toughness. If they didn't stick in the brick the field point would split and they came back at you. I never had any break except when my first deer fell on it.





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