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Help identifying hickory tree

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Messages posted to thread:
bentstick54 15-Sep-23
bentstick54 15-Sep-23
bentstick54 15-Sep-23
CoyoteJohn 15-Sep-23
Jim Davis 16-Sep-23
Jeff Durnell 16-Sep-23
bentstick54 16-Sep-23
sammyg 16-Sep-23
Jim Davis 16-Sep-23
JusPassin 16-Sep-23
bentstick54 16-Sep-23
Runner 17-Sep-23
Jeff Durnell 17-Sep-23
Runner 17-Sep-23
Jeff Durnell 17-Sep-23
bentstick54 17-Sep-23
Jeff Durnell 17-Sep-23
Runner 17-Sep-23
bentstick54 17-Sep-23
Jeff Durnell 18-Sep-23
Jeff Durnell 18-Sep-23
bentstick54 18-Sep-23
Oly 18-Sep-23
nowheels 18-Sep-23
nowheels 18-Sep-23
nowheels 18-Sep-23
From: bentstick54
Date: 15-Sep-23

bentstick54 's embedded Photo



Can anyone help me identify this hickory tree. SE Kansas along wooded stream. It’s about 10” diameter, straight about 16’ to lowest branches.

From: bentstick54
Date: 15-Sep-23

bentstick54 's embedded Photo



From: bentstick54
Date: 15-Sep-23

bentstick54 's embedded Photo



From: CoyoteJohn
Date: 15-Sep-23




I'm gonna say mockernut/bullnut/hognut. Can't find another species with bark ridges that deep...then again, if it's a type of hickory not also found in the deep south, I can't help. Lol

From: Jim Davis
Date: 16-Sep-23




Nuts don't look big enough for mocker nut, to me. Not pig nut, not shag bark, not shell bark.

Might be mocker nut, at that.

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 16-Sep-23




Bitternut hickory, aka swamp hickory. Looks like the proper size and shape nut, and the bark matches that of a mature bitternut. Bitternut also like to grow near water.

From: bentstick54
Date: 16-Sep-23

bentstick54 's embedded Photo



Blown up picture of leaves if that helps. Quite a few trees scattered through the area with some variation in the bark depending on tree size.

From: sammyg
Date: 16-Sep-23




Here in KY the only two varieties of hickory I've found on my hunting property are the shag bark hickory and the other with the smaller hickory nuts similar to what is in the picture I call a pignut hickory. The leaves on it are similar to a shag bark but are smaller in size.

From: Jim Davis
Date: 16-Sep-23




pig nut hulls have a snout reminiscent of a pig.

From: JusPassin
Date: 16-Sep-23




I think you have bitter nut there.

From: bentstick54
Date: 16-Sep-23




Thanks guys. I’m hoping to harvest it next spring for bow staves. Not sure there’s a huge difference in varieties for selfbows, but just like to know for curiosity purposes.

From: Runner
Date: 17-Sep-23




Bitternut has almost Beech smooth bark most of the time up here and it never gets rough like that. It also has very distinct winter buds.

I think it has to be another type.

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 17-Sep-23

Jeff Durnell's embedded Photo



From Wikipedia. Mature bitternut hickory bark.

From: Runner
Date: 17-Sep-23




Still different, especially when comparing the apparent size of the trees.

Bitternut does eventually get rougher bark but the tree has to be huge for that to happen

I'll take some pics of the ones here of stave size.

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 17-Sep-23




Yeah, their bark can change a lot with age. Most types of hickories do that.

The last 'smooth bark' hickory I cut was pignut, but it was big and kinda rough/furrowed. It was about 26-27" Dia. I'll have to see if I can find a picture somewhere. Perfectly straight and clear. What a beautiful beast it was :)

From: bentstick54
Date: 17-Sep-23




This tree I’m guessing of of memory was probably 10” maybe even 12” in diameter, and probably 30’ or 40’ tall? There are smaller ones nearby with the same leave pattern and the smaller ones if I remember correctly seemed to have smoother bark.

Would I be better off scouting out a few smaller diameter trees? They would definitely be easier to get out of the river bottom woods. What’s everyone’s opinion on best tree size for the best possible staves?

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 17-Sep-23




Generally, I like them over 8". That will get you 4 staves. I prefer them 12" plus. But I've made hickory selfbows with 3" trees and stone tools.... and with 30" trunks and modern tools. Depends on your preferred process, goal, tool availability... and what size tree you find available of good quality. Bigger is generally better... if you have the means to deal with it.

From: Runner
Date: 17-Sep-23




Younger wood is better wood.

I prefer ones that I can halve or quarter. I like to carry my staves out. When things start requiring a chainsaw and a truck, I lose interest.

From: bentstick54
Date: 17-Sep-23




I’m used to harvesting 8” to 12” Osage, and like the stave size it usually yields me. I’m used to using a draw knife to remove bark and sapwood. I didn’t know on peeling bark off hickory to expose the bows back, if it made much difference on tree size or not.

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 18-Sep-23




I cheated on the last hickory I got. Didn't have to carry anything. The power company dropped the trees for a guy down the road. I'd been eying those hickories up for years, so I stopped in to see him. He was gonna cut them up for fire wood, but he gave them to me instead when I told him what I wanted to use them for.

He loaded the two giant logs onto my trailer with a front end loader. I drove up to my buddy's place where he unloaded them with a skid loader and placed them right onto the sawmill. After we cut it up, he loaded it back onto my trailer with the skidloader and I went home. The only time I moved them by hand was to stack them in the garage. Gotta love hydraulics :^)

Mostly I made big quartersawn planks out of them, but I ended up with several staves and billets as well.

From: Jeff Durnell
Date: 18-Sep-23




Brian size doesn't matter when it comes to the bark peeling off easily. It happens with big trees just fine. But it only happens if the tree is cut during the growing season and the bark is removed soon after the tree is cut.

From: bentstick54
Date: 18-Sep-23




Thanks Jeff

From: Oly
Date: 18-Sep-23




Sand Hickory... according to Picture this plant ID app.

From: nowheels
Date: 18-Sep-23




As Jeff said, cut during the spring or summer and the bark will peel off in long sheets leaving you with a nice clean ring for the back. Also, hickory is much easier to split when green.

From: nowheels
Date: 18-Sep-23




As Jeff said, cut during the spring or summer and the bark will peel off in long sheets leaving you with a nice clean ring for the back. Also, hickory is much easier to split when green.

From: nowheels
Date: 18-Sep-23




Oh, by the way, I think the tree in question is mockernut.





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