Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


footed arrows

Messages posted to thread:
fn 15-Sep-23
fdp 15-Sep-23
Jim Davis 16-Sep-23
Jon Stewart 16-Sep-23
JusPassin 16-Sep-23
aromakr 16-Sep-23
Jim Davis 16-Sep-23
Sailor 16-Sep-23
JusPassin 17-Sep-23
fn 17-Sep-23
nockinaround 17-Sep-23
Jim Davis 17-Sep-23
Sailor 18-Sep-23
Sailor 18-Sep-23
Sailor 18-Sep-23
fn 18-Sep-23
Sailor 18-Sep-23
2 bears 18-Sep-23
grizzley21 18-Sep-23
M60gunner 18-Sep-23
Kunzie 19-Sep-23
Sailor 19-Sep-23
JusPassin 19-Sep-23
Sailor 19-Sep-23
Sailor 13-Nov-23
Shortbow 14-Nov-23
Sailor 14-Nov-23
From: fn
Date: 15-Sep-23




Anyone on here building 4 wing footed arrows? Ive been building them lately and need to find a way to do the final sanding on the footed part of the arrow to match the arrow shaft. Trying to figure out a jig to get down to the last bit of sanding before finishing off by hand. Got everything down pretty good except that last part. Thanks ....Frank

From: fdp
Date: 15-Sep-23




Bob Burton and I think JusPassin does as well. They will be along.

From: Jim Davis
Date: 16-Sep-23




Sanding book. Hinged block swithnandpaper-lined grooves. Grooves need to be sized slightly bigger than finished shaft to leave room for the sandpaper.

From: Jon Stewart
Date: 16-Sep-23




I also use the sanding book method of sanding the footed end. I insert the nock end into a cordless drill to make the process easier and faster. I make sure the shaft is made longer (when I make my own shafts) because the nock end gets ruined by the drill.

From: JusPassin
Date: 16-Sep-23

JusPassin's embedded Photo



I use a belt sander that has a pivot pin mounted to the metal sanding stop bar. Once adjusted I just have to rotate the shaft as the belt is running. The shaft also has to be supported about 12 inches back of the point to prevent over grinding.

It's hard to explain, but it sure works.

From: aromakr Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 16-Sep-23




For those that don't have the machinery, the sanding book is the easiest method to use. I would suggest more than one, using various grits of paper to get the desired results faster. You can spin them with a drill or just rotate the shaft with you hand.

If you have a belt sander you can make an adjustable jig and hand rotate the shaft. The jig will need adjustable stops the will control how much material is taken off. Sounds difficult but it can be done.

Bob

From: Jim Davis
Date: 16-Sep-23

Jim Davis's embedded Photo



From: Sailor
Date: 16-Sep-23




I built a jig to trim the fingers flush with the shaft on my router table. Then a couple of swipes with sandpaper and the shaft is done. Have used the sanding book but prefer the router method.

From: JusPassin
Date: 17-Sep-23




How about a picture of that jig Paul.

From: fn
Date: 17-Sep-23




Ive been racking my brain on how to build a jig using the router. I think Ive come up with a simple plan that should work. Ill build it today and post some pictures if it does work. Thanks to all that have posted.

From: nockinaround
Date: 17-Sep-23

nockinaround's embedded Photo



I do it like Jim then after all that work you drop your bow while your in your stand. This happened to me yesterday on the Mn opener.

From: Jim Davis
Date: 17-Sep-23

Jim Davis's embedded Photo



a variation of this should work.

From: Sailor
Date: 18-Sep-23




JusPassin I have some pictures on an old computer. I will see if I can come up with some pictures for you and fn. I did a build along of the footing process using the jig back in 2013 but those pictures no longer are available on the LW.

From: Sailor
Date: 18-Sep-23

Sailor's embedded Photo



Here are the pictures of the router jig. I just built this as a proto type out of some scraps to test my idea and it worked so well I never got around to making a good one. I might do a build along later when things slow down a little if anyone is interested.

From: Sailor
Date: 18-Sep-23

Sailor's embedded Photo



From: fn
Date: 18-Sep-23




Paul I assume the shaft is spinning when it passes by the router bit?

From: Sailor
Date: 18-Sep-23




No, but that would be a benefit. I was repairing broken arrows, complete with feathers and nocks for stumping arrows. So I rotated the shaft by hand for each pass by the router bit.

From: 2 bears
Date: 18-Sep-23




Love the looks of footed shafts. I have a block of Wenge would it make good footings? >>>---> Ken

From: grizzley21 Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 18-Sep-23




i would worry about getting a blowout, using a router, i would trim down the wings of the foot first,

From: M60gunner
Date: 18-Sep-23




Has anyone tried turning them down on a lathe? Like the small “pen” lathe. Making footed, tapered shafts has been a dream of mine for years. Unfortunately my efforts at making the jigs hasn’t worked out.

From: Kunzie
Date: 19-Sep-23




I'm interested Paul. I think it's a good idea.

From: Sailor
Date: 19-Sep-23




grizzley21, Blowout is a consideration but the whole reason for the router jig is to trim down the wings of the foot. If you have grain runout on the wings blowout can happen but since I am controlling the jig by hand it is easy to control the depth of cut and feed rate to nibble away the wings on any feet with grain run out. I try to make my feet out of straight grain wood anyway and have never lost a foot due to blowout.

From: JusPassin
Date: 19-Sep-23




I get the principle Paul, but how do you move the shaft left to right with that system?

From: Sailor
Date: 19-Sep-23




JusPassin, I move the jig by hand. The router bit is a pattern bit with a bearing at its base. I adjust the jig with its sliding dovetails so the bit cuts parallel to and just shy of the arrow shaft when the base of the jig is riding along the bearing. I just simply move the jig along the bearing from left to right turning the shaft a little between each pass.

From: Sailor
Date: 13-Nov-23




I misstated the direction of travel of the jig when trimming the feet. The jig moves from right to left not left to right. Thanks fn for pointing out this mistake. Sorry for the confusion. Paul

From: Shortbow
Date: 14-Nov-23




I've not made any footed shafts yet but have made many shafts by hand from a board using a thumb plane. Would a small thumb plane not work well to remove the excess bulk and then just do a little sanding to finish? I know many talk about how hard and labor intensive it is making them from scratch but honestly you can knock out a dozen shafts pretty quickly and the more you do the faster you get. I no longer have a bandsaw or I'd have dozens more of arrows and shafts on top of the many dozens I have now!! Haha

From: Sailor
Date: 14-Nov-23




A thumb plane would work just fine. It takes patience and practice to keep the shaft perfectly round which it sounds like you have. Give it a try.





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