Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Hill quiver how to?

Messages posted to thread:
Slayer 21-Jun-22
Slayer 21-Jun-22
aromakr 21-Jun-22
Caughtandhobble 21-Jun-22
TradToTheBone 21-Jun-22
George D. Stout 21-Jun-22
Kisatchie 21-Jun-22
Andy Man 21-Jun-22
Andy Man 21-Jun-22
Andy Man 21-Jun-22
Andy Man 21-Jun-22
Andy Man 21-Jun-22
fdp 21-Jun-22
Andy Man 21-Jun-22
fdp 21-Jun-22
Andy Man 21-Jun-22
Jim 21-Jun-22
Thumper 21-Jun-22
2 bears 21-Jun-22
Slayer 21-Jun-22
David Hill 21-Jun-22
babysaph 21-Jun-22
David Hill 21-Jun-22
David Hill 21-Jun-22
Skeets 22-Jun-22
Andy Man 22-Jun-22
Bill Rickvalsky 22-Jun-22
zonic 22-Jun-22
Stealth2 22-Jun-22
White Falcon 22-Jun-22
fiddlebow 22-Jun-22
Bowlim 23-Jun-22
Sunset Hill 23-Jun-22
Bill Rickvalsky 23-Jun-22
Kisatchie 23-Jun-22
Andy Man 23-Jun-22
Sunset Hill 23-Jun-22
Kisatchie 24-Jun-22
Bill Rickvalsky 24-Jun-22
Kisatchie 24-Jun-22
Kisatchie 24-Jun-22
Andy Man 24-Jun-22
Bill Rickvalsky 24-Jun-22
Kisatchie 24-Jun-22
two4hooking 24-Jun-22
two4hooking 24-Jun-22
two4hooking 24-Jun-22
cut it out 25-Jun-22
cut it out 25-Jun-22
Osr144 25-Jun-22
From: Slayer
Date: 21-Jun-22




Does anyone know if there is a video or would anyone k ow how to properly adjust a Hill back quiver? I was giving an old one and would like to hunt with it. However I can’t seem to smoothly retrieve my arrows. Thanks for any help.

From: Slayer
Date: 21-Jun-22




Does anyone know if there is a video or would anyone k ow how to properly adjust a Hill back quiver? I was giving an old one and would like to hunt with it. However I can’t seem to smoothly retrieve my arrows. Thanks for any help.

From: aromakr Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 21-Jun-22




The way Schulz and Hill recommended bring your bow hand around to the bottom of the quiver and push up while retrieving an arrow. Its done simultaneous. Takes a little practice.

Bob

From: Caughtandhobble
Date: 21-Jun-22




Bud told me the closer to your ear is easier on old stiff bones :)

From: TradToTheBone
Date: 21-Jun-22




I’ve read and seen pics and videos and it seems bow hand / arm pushing upward while reaching back with string hand would be correct. That being said, some wear lthe quivers more vertical with fletching almost behind their heads and others fletching nearer the shoulder.Might be a body type issue? Howard Hill and John Schultz videos on YouTube would be a good place to start. Also attend local shoots and talk to those using one if possible .

From: George D. Stout
Date: 21-Jun-22




Simply adjust it to where it feels best to you and allows you to retract arrows. There is no overall pattern that works for every person. What worked for Hill may not work for you, I know I can't do it like he did so I adjust it so it's higher on my shoulder.

From: Kisatchie
Date: 21-Jun-22




Hill and Schulz both had the arrows hanging way off the shoulder. I use nothing but a Hill style quiver but I don’t like having them that low. I like mine closer to my ear. This keeps the arrows close to your head and to me easier to grab. I don’t have to bump the quiver up to grab arrows. You can adjust the strap so you don’t have to do this it’s added motion I don’t need when hunting, and imo having to bump the quiver bottom tells you it’s not adjusted right. Also when slipping thru the woods the arrows are right beside your head and a little lower, with them hanging off your shoulder they hang up easier on brush.

From: Andy Man
Date: 21-Jun-22




mine hangs off my shoulder and push up with my hand holding the bow -but realy dont even need to do that most times

been using one most all my life-don't even think about it -just grab a nock and slide it on the string

From: Andy Man
Date: 21-Jun-22

Andy Man's embedded Photo



pictures of how I wear it

From: Andy Man
Date: 21-Jun-22

Andy Man's embedded Photo



From: Andy Man
Date: 21-Jun-22

Andy Man's embedded Photo



From: Andy Man
Date: 21-Jun-22

Andy Man's embedded Photo



works for me

never a thought about getting an arrow out

and can see I'm not a highly flexable kinda person (short and squatty -all a$$ and no body)

guess you get used to it over time

From: fdp
Date: 21-Jun-22




One of the key factors is how it is constructed. Particularly how the strap is attached, and the material it is made out of. A true Hill style quiver will have the strap offset which aids it in laying correctly to begin with. In my experience a back quiver without that feature never works well.

The term Hill style quiver has become bastardized like many other terms in archery.

From: Andy Man
Date: 21-Jun-22

Andy Man's embedded Photo



Got that right Frank espically on the strap

Have one by John Schulz and one by Nate Steen and they both have the strap offset the same

I have added a dog collar to both so I can go from overcoat to Tee shirt quickly

don't want it tight to you so can easily slide under arm for thick brush traveling or running (which I don't do anymore )

From: fdp
Date: 21-Jun-22




It is amazing how important the positioning of that strap is when it comes to being able to comfortably use a Hill style quiver.

From: Andy Man
Date: 21-Jun-22

Andy Man's embedded Photo



can get an Idea where the strap is

From: Jim Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 21-Jun-22

Jim's embedded Photo



This is how my quiver is adjusted for me.

From: Thumper Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 21-Jun-22




Here's a good read with some good info from our very own "Two4Hooking".

http://traditionalknowhow.blogspot.com/search?q=back+quiver

From: 2 bears
Date: 21-Jun-22




The typical bump with the bow hand is most common. A strap tug in the front with the bow hand is easier for some. More so if obstructions or other folks around. You can keep the bow vertical in front of you & hook the strap with your thumb. Andy Man pictured most common position when he wasn't making the dog tote it for him. :-) >>>----> Ken

From: Slayer
Date: 21-Jun-22




Thanks so much for all the info. I will work on adjusting the strap and give that a go.

From: David Hill
Date: 21-Jun-22

David Hill 's embedded Photo



From: babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 21-Jun-22




Andy Man you don't need a quiver. Bisquit is already smart enough to carry your arrows. I told you she would be a good dog.

From: David Hill
Date: 21-Jun-22

David Hill 's embedded Photo



From: David Hill
Date: 21-Jun-22




Some people prefer the arrows more off the shoulder ,some more vertical. I can easily touch the top of my shoulder with my hand but reaching further down to the outside is harder I adjust my strap to fit me.

From: Skeets
Date: 22-Jun-22




I adjust my strap so that the quiver is just under my armpit when the quiver is slid down horizontal as for passing through brush. Then when it is in normal position to draw an arrow I can slightly push the bottom of the quiver with my elbow. If you watch John Schulz in his video you will see him using his elbow as he reaches to draw an arrow.

From: Andy Man
Date: 22-Jun-22




Baby:

That’s old Belle

If put the quiver on Biscuit I would be ordering another one

He has gotten a lot better now though

From: Bill Rickvalsky
Date: 22-Jun-22




Does anyone have a link to some plans for making a Hill back quiver or perhaps another similar style. I have toyed with the idea of trying a back quiver again.

I have a love/hate relationship with back quivers. I like the looks of them. When I had one I also liked the close fit to the body and relative ease of drawing an arrow. My big headache was putting arrows back in the quiver. It seems I never could get the hang of inserting the arrow without a lot of searching around for the opening.

Some of what folks have said here about adjusting for the draw of the arrow is interesting. But that was never a difficult problem for me. It was putting an arrow back in.

I have primarily used a side or hip quiver of one kind or another but I would like to give a back quiver another try.

From: zonic
Date: 22-Jun-22




soap creek posted a build along on here. a while back. I have two of his back quivers and like them very much.

From: Stealth2 Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 22-Jun-22

Stealth2's embedded Photo



From: White Falcon
Date: 22-Jun-22




http://www3.sympatico.ca/ragiwarmbear/diy/bc/backplan.html

From: fiddlebow
Date: 22-Jun-22




Andy Man, I like your idea of adding the dog collar for quick adjustability!

From: Bowlim
Date: 23-Jun-22




I would not use that pattern.

I am only interested in the Hill style, with the best details. They are very simple to build, but I have not seen a plan for one online that was all that close. The Leathernet has a forum on archery stuff and it is mostly fantasy, but I guess there could be something in there.

That said, I still wouldn't use a pattern. I want the design to fit my arrows. Basically I make them so 5 inch fletch stands above the edge of the Quiver with field points, or judos, with whatever top finish you want from various that Hill used. I always use the fold over.

Then the arrows ride a little higher in the quiver with broadheads. You don't have to use 5" fletch, but that is the dimension either way to be able to do knock handling, which is the super power of this kind of quiver, or one of them.

The circumference is usually larger than you will see patterns for, I will get back to that.

I used info from american leathers old site which was still up on the wayback machine when I last looked. And I use the Traditional know how site for some recent pictures of Nate's work. Nate Steen has talked about how he makes his, with pictures, on this site. It is not a how to, but it fills in the details.

Details that most designs do not get are:

Strap angle and position

Leather weight and type. The leather is not so heavy it won't collapse, but not so light it will show wrinkles.

Nate gives the circumference that he uses, the leather he currently uses, and you can find a lot of picture from which you can design you own details, if you track down his various posts on this board.

Changes to the seam.

Making

Basically all it is is a square of leather with holes in it. I am a woodworker, so it is easier for me to make a 2-3 inch plug with the shape I want. Then I wrap the leather around it and get a precise overlap. Then I can use a divider to step off the holes on the bottom. I lay out the holes on the side seam from the number of stitches in the picture I Like or from past builds, the side seam is nothing special. Once the side seam is stitched, and I have punched the holes in the bottom of the tube, I fit it back over the plug, and mark holes in the bottom leather from the bottom of the tube. I offset them a half stitch. And I stitch them up.

After that, I fold over the top and lace it up.

If you copy a quiver from the real pros, the only part that I don't have good info for is the bottom shape/plug shape. But the good news is that you can fit that as many times as you want to. The whole thing is just laced together.

From: Sunset Hill
Date: 23-Jun-22

Sunset Hill's embedded Photo



Some of Hill's photo op pictures show the quiver more vertical but his casual photos or videos show a lower hanging quiver. Schulz and his boys have pretty low hanging quivers as well. I prefer a lower-hanging off the shoulder setup. It keeps the arrow nocks below the tree branches and lets the arrows fall more into a bundle in the quiver for extra quietness. If the strap is reversed ala Hill / Schulz and the smooth side is towards the body, the quiver slides around on the body very well. Sliding the quiver around easily helps when going through brush and trees. This sliding action also lets the quiver be easily bumped up to grab an arrow nock and then the quiver slides back down which in turn helps the arrow clear leather better. I bump my quiver with my elbow and it's just second-nature after 35 years of doing it. The more vertical the quiver hangs, and the smaller the quiver mouth, the more "straight-out-the-end" the arrow has to be withdrawn instead of coming out at an angle from a low-hanging big flat Hill style quiver. Coming straight out the end, especially if the quiver doesn't slide around much, takes a longer arm motion to get the arrow out and sometimes guys will run out of arm length before the broadhead clears the leather....and they end up looking all clumsy :)

From: Bill Rickvalsky
Date: 23-Jun-22




A lot of talk about bumping the quiver with elbow or hand to make arrows accessible for drawing out of the quiver. I understand the various reasons for that and the positioning of the quiver and strap locations. But my headache with a back quiver is getting arrows back in the quiver. If I am at a 3D shoot or stumping or practicing I need to get arrows back in the quiver. I can never seem to find the opening of the quiver whether it is verticle or more towards the shoulder. I can't seem to crane my neck enough to see the opening well enough. I can't tell you how many times I thought I had the arrow going into the quiver and it wound up on the ground behind me.

Am I just a klutz or is there some secret to getting the arrows back in?

From: Kisatchie
Date: 23-Jun-22




Something is definitely wrong. You shouldn’t have to look to get the arrows back in the quiver. I can grab a handful of arrows and without looking put them in my quiver.

From: Andy Man
Date: 23-Jun-22




adding to what nate said- hung low off the shoulder makes walking through a tight spot eaiser with out hanging up

by turning and leading with the left shoulder (right hand shooter) as go through the tight spot

sorta like a buck turns his head going through stuff to clear his antlers

From: Sunset Hill
Date: 23-Jun-22




Bill, some people I've seen have more rounded upper backs and shoulders and/or a larger upper chest girth. If the quiver is hanging too vertical, then the quiver doesn't allow the arrow nocks to point in the right direction, making them hard to grab and hard to direct back into the quiver because of the quiver bend. In the case of a vertical quiver on a rounded upper back, the arrow nocks usually point away from the body. That means the quiver mouth is also pointing off which would make it harder to remove/replace arrows. I don't know if this is your body physique or not.

A quiver hanging on a flatter angle may fix this issue, if this is the case.

From: Kisatchie
Date: 24-Jun-22

Kisatchie 's embedded Photo



No bump, no look, no problems

From: Bill Rickvalsky
Date: 24-Jun-22




Kisatchie,

I never had any problem whatsoever drawing arrows from a back quiver. I didn't need a hand or elbow bump or to look at the arrows. My problem is getting them back in. In that picture you are holding the nock so I assume you are drawing the arrow as that would be an awkward way to put arrows back in by holding the nock.

When I mentioned that I wouldn't be able to see the opening because I couldn't turn my head and crane my neck far enough that was an even if I wanted to situation. You're right I shouldn't have to look and don't want to look and I don't look. I can feel/sense where the quiver opening is. I just seem to miss it a lot. Not fun.

I am surprised that not even one other person had this same issue. I can't be the only klutz around. I am going to make myself a back quiver and give it another try as soon as I find the exact design I want to make. If I get annoyed again you may see a quiver giveaway thread posted sometime.

From: Kisatchie
Date: 24-Jun-22




You should be able to put the arrow in the quiver by the nock. You can control the arrow by the nock as Schulz was taught by Hill. The only time I don’t use the nock is if I have a handful of arrows. It may be more about being familiar with your equipment. You can’t use a back quiver for 30 minutes and expect it to work as well as someone that has 10-20 years of nothing but that same quiver .

From: Kisatchie
Date: 24-Jun-22

Kisatchie 's embedded Photo



I forgot to mention. A lot of the times when I see someone struggle with a back quiver they trying to use a 20” or 21” quiver length and 32” carbon arrows. If you really need 32” arrows you will have the corresponding arm length. When your draw length is really 27” and you have 4-5” of arrow hanging out past the riser your creating problems when using back quivers with extra long arrows and short arms. I build my quivers so a fletched blunt arrow(I shoot only blunts or broadheads)sits no more than 1/2” from the quiver top. This puts an arrow with a 3” broadhead about 3 1/2” above the quiver not 6-8” sticking out above your head. I’ve seen people struggle to try and reach up to grab their arrows from the quiver because of this. You can see in the pics the arrow heights in the quiver and the location of the arrows when shooting. Easily reached between the ear and shoulder not down to the side.

But as mentioned everyone’s body shape and flexibility is different but you should with practice figure out a way to make a BQ work.

From: Andy Man
Date: 24-Jun-22




Bill Rickvalsky

I generally don't have to bump up most times to get an arrow out by the nock

but I generally bump up perty good to replace them in the quiver and usually I have a grip on the shaft when replacing a bunch - I can get one in by the nock but rarely do it that way

wouldn't be looking for a design

use the Schulz /Hill design-proven

From: Bill Rickvalsky
Date: 24-Jun-22




My arms aren't long enough to reach high enough to just hold the nock and get the point to go into the opening. And where, pray tell, did you read where I only tried a back quiver out for 30 minutes and gave up? Thanks for the tips. I will now go get familiar with my equipment.

From: Kisatchie
Date: 24-Jun-22

Kisatchie 's embedded Photo



Nobody said you did Bill, and this ain’t all about Bill. Your not the only person that struggles needlessly with back quivers, it’s nearly an epidemic.

From: two4hooking
Date: 24-Jun-22

two4hooking's embedded Photo



I love me a good BQ thread.

From: two4hooking
Date: 24-Jun-22

two4hooking's embedded Photo



Good on this thread.

From: two4hooking
Date: 24-Jun-22




Arrrgh. My phone doesn’t like the wall. Computer has no problem with sideways.

From: cut it out
Date: 25-Jun-22

cut it out's embedded Photo



I’ll try to fix them

From: cut it out
Date: 25-Jun-22

cut it out's embedded Photo



From: Osr144
Date: 25-Jun-22




I adjust the height and angle so when I put my hand beside my ear it naturally comes in contact with my knocks.I can then draw knock and shoot in one fluid motion.I can also replace arrows in the same manner.Its just an adjustment thing Get an experienced person to check out the adjustment for you.Once set up than just use it .It will become second nature to you.Hope this helps you. Osr





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