Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


How about a "tips" thread?

Messages posted to thread:
George D. Stout 23-May-22
EZ Archer 23-May-22
Don T. Lewis 23-May-22
Will tell 23-May-22
Desperado 23-May-22
monkeyball 23-May-22
Ben Ahrens 23-May-22
M60gunner 23-May-22
George D. Stout 23-May-22
HEXX 23-May-22
M60gunner 23-May-22
Nemophilist 23-May-22
Batman 23-May-22
Ironfist 23-May-22
Live2Hunt 23-May-22
Cedarsavage 23-May-22
Ben Ahrens 23-May-22
Wudstix 23-May-22
reddogge 23-May-22
George D. Stout 23-May-22
Caughtandhobble 23-May-22
Selden Slider 23-May-22
Clydebow 23-May-22
Lowcountry 23-May-22
Catskills 23-May-22
benzy 23-May-22
fiddlebow 23-May-22
Babysaph 23-May-22
Babysaph 23-May-22
Selden Slider 23-May-22
Driver 23-May-22
Kisatchie 23-May-22
Supernaut 23-May-22
Red Beastmaster 23-May-22
txdm 23-May-22
Shawn 23-May-22
Fling em 23-May-22
Keefers 23-May-22
Keefers 23-May-22
GUTPILEPA 23-May-22
Pdiddly2 23-May-22
Bearfootin 23-May-22
Bearfootin 23-May-22
Bearfootin 23-May-22
Bearfootin 23-May-22
Bearfootin 23-May-22
Jon Stewart 23-May-22
AK Pathfinder 23-May-22
bluesman 24-May-22
bluesman 24-May-22
Boker 24-May-22
bluesman 24-May-22
bluesman 24-May-22
paul craig 24-May-22
carpenter 24-May-22
DanaC 24-May-22
DanaC 24-May-22
Keefers 24-May-22
MGF 24-May-22
HuumanCreed 24-May-22
MGF 24-May-22
Ricky The Cabel Guy 24-May-22
George D. Stout 24-May-22
Supernaut 24-May-22
the Black Spot 24-May-22
Rick Barbee 24-May-22
MCNSC 24-May-22
Buzz 24-May-22
Snow Crow 24-May-22
Darryl/Deni 24-May-22
Orion 24-May-22
Orion 24-May-22
heftyhunter 24-May-22
heftyhunter 24-May-22
Frisky 25-May-22
bluesman 25-May-22
DanaC 25-May-22
Jon Stewart 25-May-22
Jon Stewart 25-May-22
Ramjet 25-May-22
George D. Stout 25-May-22
Bassmaster 25-May-22
Nemophilist 25-May-22
Tim Cousineau 25-May-22
Silverhead 25-May-22
Wudstix 25-May-22
Carpdaddy 25-May-22
Tomas 26-May-22
Catskills 26-May-22
Wapiti - - M. S. 27-May-22
MGF 27-May-22
Billy Knight 27-May-22
Tomas 27-May-22
Wapiti - - M. S. 27-May-22
Papadeerhtr 28-May-22
Bluebell 28-May-22
Babysaph 28-May-22
Don T. Lewis 28-May-22
Don T. Lewis 28-May-22
DanaC 29-May-22
Blue Duck 29-May-22
Altitude Sickness 29-May-22
ShortStick 29-May-22
HEXX 29-May-22
R.grider 29-May-22
Nemophilist 30-May-22
DanaC 30-May-22
Babysaph 30-May-22
Tdwhip 30-May-22
onager 30-May-22
mangonboat 30-May-22
Osr144 30-May-22
Brad Lehmann 03-Jun-22
George D. Stout 03-Jun-22
Linecutter 03-Jun-22
shortdraw 03-Jun-22
Stick 03-Jun-22
scndwfstlhntng 04-Jun-22
From: George D. Stout
Date: 23-May-22




Instead of trolling just to see who you can rile-up, how about offering some of the things that can help folks, or at least get them thinking about archery versus tomfoolery. It doesn't have to be groundbreaking, or earth-shattering, just things you may do, or things you put in your pack for whatever reason.

One of the things I carry in my fanny pack is a toothbrush. No, not to brush my teeth, but to quickly clean dirt out of an errant broadhead or mud from you folding knife, or myriad other tasks that it may come in handy for. Normally I cut half of the handle off for space saving and then slightly melt the edges of the cut area to make it better to grip. Only takes a tiny bit of space and is nice to have on occasion.

From: EZ Archer
Date: 23-May-22




I carry a toothbrush as well George, in both field point and broad head quivers. Also carry dental floss or plumbers tape to help tighten down heads and a bastard file in my broad head quiver for last minute sharpening. Another thing I’ve been doing for a while is using the lead tape that tennis players and golfers use to weight their rackets and clubs to increase head weight on my shafts- works like a charm and you can buy rolls of lead tape online or at pretty much any golf store.

From: Don T. Lewis
Date: 23-May-22

Don T. Lewis's embedded Photo



Sounds like a great idea George. Who carries a back up pocket knife in their Fanny pack? I need a tip. I took this old Barlow apart. Pretty easy to do. Now who knows an easy way to put it back together. ;)

From: Will tell
Date: 23-May-22




My best advice is don't fry bacon naked, don't pee in the wind or on a flat rock. It doesn't weigh much to carry some toilet paper with you, can mark a blood trail and clean up a mess. : )

From: Desperado
Date: 23-May-22




If you hunt from a tree stand, always carry an extra arrow with a field point on it. If you shoot a game animal and do not see it drop, shoot the field tipped arrow into the ground where the animal was standing when you shot. If you lose the blood trail, you can always come back to the beginning and start over at the exact shot location. Be safe...Des

From: monkeyball
Date: 23-May-22

monkeyball's embedded Photo



Good positive thread George........

I'm old school in a lot of ways.....directional for one. I carry a compass when I am in a big area, after having to use that "one" the very first time, I now carry two. Two arrows pointing north convince me that "OK, I need to go this way."

Shoot a couple shots "bare-fingers" each shooting session, and make sure you do it with broad heads also. It will feel different and perform different, but if that time comes when you left your tab or glove behind, it won't feel like a stranger to you.

Carry an extra glove or tab in your quiver, pack, etc.

Pocket knives are great, but wear a fixed blade on your belt. You never know when you are going to need it in a hurry and it is not always easy to dig your folder out of your pocket in some cases. Carry one of each.

If your hunting big, unfamiliar areas.....put a bic lighter, and a handful of dryer lint in a small ziplock. You can make a night in the woods a bit more doable with these fire starters and they take up very little room.

Good post George.

Good Shooting->->->->Craig

From: Ben Ahrens
Date: 23-May-22




If I take a thermos or water bottle into the woods with me I tuck it into a wool sock. This helps quiet it, covers up highly reflective surfaces on my clearcoated containers, and provides a bit of extra insulation to keep the liquid warm or cold as the season dictates.

From: M60gunner
Date: 23-May-22




Arrow making tip. For inexpensive wraps, buy Oracal 651 or 751 vinyl sheets. One 12x12 sheet will make a dozen wraps for 5/16” shafts. Cost maybe $2. Cheaper on Amazon if you buy in quantities.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 23-May-22




I second Craig's "wear a fixed blade on your belt", I do that with my late father-in-laws old fixed-blade knife, mainly for me to add a layer of protection, albeit the more hand to hand type.

Ben Ahrens, I like the wool sock thing too. I knew a feller who once would use oversized wool socks to put over his hunting shoes to make them quieter in the fall leaves.

From: HEXX
Date: 23-May-22




I used to use peroxide for blood trailing but had a problem when the blood ran out. Got

me a inferred adapter adapter for my iPhone and nothing like seeing a big orange cigar

lying in the dark woods giving off 70 degree heat when all around is 45 degrees.

From: M60gunner
Date: 23-May-22




I carried multiple folding knives in my fanny pack. Easier to grab a fresh, sharp one the trying to sharpen one when your all bloody. Those 10 gallon size plastic zip lock bags have many uses as well along with a good size length of para cord.

From: Nemophilist
Date: 23-May-22

Nemophilist's embedded Photo



Some of these are if I'm bowhunting near home and some are for if I'm bowhunting way in the game lands a couple miles from my vehicle and far from home.

Carry a little bottle of hydrogen peroxide specially when the leaves change color. If you hit a deer and if you're not sure if a tiny spot is blood or not the hydrogen peroxide will confirm if it's blood.

Carry a compass. Not only for land navigation but also if you hit a deer you can shoot an azimuth with it in the direction the deer ran. So when you get out of the tree you can follow that same azimuth reading to the first sign of blood.

Carry two small LED flashights.

Carry two knives. One fixed blade and one folder.

Small pair of binoculars.

Carry at least two fire starters. I carry a bic lighter and a magnesium fire starter, or a ferro rod. Or even a road flare in case you have to make a fire real quick.

Field dressing kit.

Fletching waterproof covering. In case you get caught in the rain.

Emergency poncho. In case you get caught in the rain.

Small first aid kit. I learned this one the hard way after I sliced my hand with a broadhead one year.

Chemical handwarmers in the late archery season after Christmas.

Something to drink and a couple pieces of fruit.

A tiny bottle of bleach (unsented bleach) to purify water (3 to 4 drops per quart). No it won't hurt you.

Toliet paper, not only for wiping your behind but also to mark the blood trail if a deer is hit. Always clean it up after tracking is done.

A pistol when I'm bowhunting in bear country like the game lands I bow hunt in. Taking on a mature black bear with a knife you will lose that fight.

This seems like a lot but it fits nicely into my daypack.

From: Batman
Date: 23-May-22




These are good! Hope that there will be lots more? GOOD HUNTING & BLESSED BE!

From: Ironfist
Date: 23-May-22




Zip lock with Toilet paper. 2 lighters and matches in a waterproof container, One compass around my neck , one in my pocket and 2 in my pack. 2 flashlights, Bear spray, 2 sets of gloves. Folding knife and 2 beltknives. All in a small back pack.

From: Live2Hunt
Date: 23-May-22




Desperado, what a great Idea with the arrow after shot. Things always look different when you get on the ground. The dryer lint is a good one also. I have to add, an extra tin of Grizzly longcut hid in your pack so when you get into the tree you don't go crazy because the one that was in your pocket is no longer there? Been there, done that.

From: Cedarsavage
Date: 23-May-22




I don't have anything too groundbreaking. I like the posts about carrying something too start a fire. Pre-covid I hardly ever started fires, and lost the skill. We started cooking grilling on wood fire when restaurants were closed. Man for a guy who grew up heating with wood I was rusty on fire starting!!! Something that's been real convenient for me is Delorme inreach. I can satelitte text my wife from anywhere. I prefer hunting where I don't have service but I get to hunt alot more because I'm able to check in daily and give both of us piece of mind. If nothing else it saves a ton of time and frustration if I'm out past the deadline.

From: Ben Ahrens
Date: 23-May-22




I made the mistake just yesterday scouting, but bring snacks. Is it necessary? Of course not. But for me, if I’m hungry my focus isn’t where it needs to be.

From: Wudstix Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 23-May-22




Many good ideas, some of mine are specific to me. Fire starter for sure lint and sassafras sticks, lighters/Ferro rod. Compass. Couple fixed blade knives. Extra tab. Extra wool top layer and cap. Sawyer filter and 1 liter water bottle, full. Mixed nuts. 550 cordage. First aid. Communication device. Whistle. Knee brace. If I'm going to be miles from vehicle my Dyneema hammock tarp.

From: reddogge
Date: 23-May-22




Before all of the fancy pouches you can buy these days I had a small denim zipper pouch on my belt that contained a Bear Sharpener, dental floss, an extra glove, and three 2" long cup hooks. I screwed the cup hook in the tree and hung my bow on it. I never found myself without a bow hanger.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 23-May-22




Staying hydrated is eating before you're hungry and drinking before you're thirsty. I learned that while riding bicycle long distances back in the 80's. If you wait till you feel thirsty, you are waiting too long.

From: Caughtandhobble
Date: 23-May-22

Caughtandhobble's embedded Photo



Never loose another tab. Simply replace the chord with a longer piece. Then just place the chord over the tip of the bow and run the tab between the limb and string.

From: Selden Slider
Date: 23-May-22




I attach a knife and sheath to the shoulder strap of my back quiver. Placed low on the strap it's easily accessed near my waist. Frank

From: Clydebow
Date: 23-May-22




Extra pair of glasses.

From: Lowcountry
Date: 23-May-22




I carry several cotton balls soaked in Vaseline in an old film cannister. They make an excellent emergency fire starter. You can easily light them with match, lighter sparks, etc. and they burn hot and long enough to build a nice fire.

From: Catskills
Date: 23-May-22




A lightweight vest with big and many pockets. (I like Magellan brand because it's so light) Inside go all the essentials already listed. For me I would add, small ultralight binocs, headlamp, multi purpose repair kit. Most stuff has already been mentioned.

From: benzy
Date: 23-May-22




For arrow wraps... Head to your local sign shop. When they load their vinyl cutter they end up throwing out 6" to 12" by roll width. (normally 18"+) See if they'll give you some of that "garbage". My shop knows me and hooks me up, reflective vinyl too. All you need to do then is cut your own wraps at whatever size you need. A cheap paper cutter from Amazon works perfect for this.

From: fiddlebow
Date: 23-May-22




Thank you for starting this George, lots of good ideas. One thing I always carry when I’m hunting, scouting, etc is a roll of orange flagging tape. It makes it easier when tracking game and you never know what you might see and want to mark while in the woods.

From: Babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 23-May-22




I carry a bare shaft to periodically check my shooting. Kind of like having a coach with me . Good advice from Ken Beck.

From: Babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 23-May-22




I carry a bare shaft to periodically check my shooting. Kind of like having a coach with me . Good advice from Ken Beck.

From: Selden Slider
Date: 23-May-22




I mark my arrows where the brace height is when nocked. This way any arrow can be used to check brace height. Frank

From: Driver
Date: 23-May-22




A 9' by 12' thin plastic painters drop cloth. About the size of a tube of tooth paste and cost about a buck. Those giant orange trash bags you see the guys filling along the highway take up very little room and can make an emergency shelter or poncho and are very visible when you want to be found.

From: Kisatchie
Date: 23-May-22




Here’s a “tip” about “tips” Probably not anything new but someone might not have tried it. You can cut the tip off a duco cement tube(leaving the threads) and a super glue applicator tip will screw right on and has the perfect tip size for fletching and a cap to seal the glue when done. I’ve tried the bottles with metal tips but got tired of transferring the glue from tube to bottle, and the glue clogging the metal tips etc.

From: Supernaut
Date: 23-May-22




Some really great tips here and thanks for sharing them.

What I carry into the woods varies depending on where I'm hunting and for how long.

One thing I learned is ALWAYS make sure you give your gear etc a good going over before you take it afield. I check my goodies over before the season and a couple times during the season at least. Running out of toilet paper in your pack is no fun but getting hurt or worse because a piece of gear like a portable stand or safety harness failed would be terrible and avoidable 99% of the time IMO.

Also if it's a new item or piece of gear to you, make sure you try it before you head out in the field and know how to use it.

From: Red Beastmaster
Date: 23-May-22




My pack has a contact lens case with a bit of string wax and fuzzy velcro. The string wax has a zillion uses and the velcro can replace a rest or side plate.

From: txdm
Date: 23-May-22




If you mostly hunt square hay bales like I do, you'll notice the middle part gets worn out and soon your arrows will go right through. Put a stick in the baling strings on each end and twist it around to tighten the string down, compressing the hay so it stops the arrows again.

BONUS: When spring comes, replace the bales and use the old ones for gardening...Now you can say your archery hobby puts food on the table.

From: Shawn
Date: 23-May-22




If a ways from anything a couple water purifying tablets and a lighter as well as waterproof matches or mag fire starter. Near home, hunt the wind when after critters that care about human smell. Shawn

From: Fling em
Date: 23-May-22




For a wind check. Use old film bottle with small hole in one end. Fill full of milk week. Then wrap velcro on bow and other side on container. Always right where you need it.

From: Keefers
Date: 23-May-22




Here’s something I’ve been doing while setting up my Huntmore 360 chair in the morning and I kneel down on the ground but carry a plastic garden bag with me in my chair duffle bag so my knees don’t get wet.Then if I leave my chair in my home made ground bling I slip the bag over my chair and leave it overnight. It will keep the chair from getting damp overnight and I don’t have to put the chair together.

From: Keefers
Date: 23-May-22

Keefers's embedded Photo



Nathan , I was going to post the exact same thing lol Here’s one I made recently

From: GUTPILEPA
Date: 23-May-22




Zip ties come in very handy

From: Pdiddly2
Date: 23-May-22




BS “ I carry a bare shaft to periodically check my shooting. Kind of like having a coach with me”

Really??

I guess you think negative attention is better than no attention at all by dumping on a positive thread.

It isn’t…at all. Ever.

From: Bearfootin
Date: 23-May-22




A small tube of super glue can come in handy for so many things.

From: Bearfootin
Date: 23-May-22




Fluorescent orange trail tape roll is another useful item.

From: Bearfootin
Date: 23-May-22




An extra pair of socks a some good plastic grocery bags can make a pair of wet boots more comfortable.

From: Bearfootin
Date: 23-May-22




OK, I’m on a roll….

A dozen 12” zip ties, a roll of brass snare wire, a leaf litter bag or 2…makes a great rain coat, heck,..I know a fellow that caries a rat trap with a piece of wire attached to secure it…makes a really good squirrel trap.

Oh ya, don’t forget the survival blanket….

From: Bearfootin
Date: 23-May-22




Great thread….

Sorry I might have duplicated some of the tips…

Lloyd

From: Jon Stewart
Date: 23-May-22

Jon Stewart's embedded Photo



Bracket I made to hold a game tracker when I bear hunt. I put some mole skin on the back so it doesn't scratch my bow. Little eletrical tape holds the bracket on the bow very well.

From: AK Pathfinder
Date: 23-May-22




A lot of folks these days rely on their cell phone for everything from navigation to contacting friends. A back up power supply is a great thing to have along. There are several LED flashlights on the market that have the ability to charge a phone with a small 6 inch cord. Not a bad thing to have if the phone dies on you.

From: bluesman
Date: 24-May-22




I Cary a fire starter in case I get hurt and have to stay put .For fire starting which has been mentioned I might add I put my lint or cotton ball in a waterproof container and I coat the cotton ball in Vaseline which makes it basically easier to start and wind proof . I prefer a flint to a lighter .

Another tip , fill your vehicle up with gas a day before you hunt and never wear your hunting boots or clothes at a gas station as there is residual oil and gas in the concrete . Plus the fumes can stay in your clothes .

From: bluesman
Date: 24-May-22




Instead of paying lots of money for cheese cloth at a sporting good store for game meat carrying in the field . Go to a thrift store and buy white cotton pillow cases , they fit a quarter of a deer nicely , they breath , keep the flies off , and you wash them and use them again !!! I also used them in my second fridge to store the quarters till I butcher .

From: Boker
Date: 24-May-22




Really good thread. I cant add much but do some of the stuff that has been mentioned and am going to start some of the others.

One tip I’d give is to never let buck fever cause you to do something that’s unsafe. I have, got lucky but it was still foolish.

Whatever you enjoy doing weather it’s hunting , stump shooting or 3d. Use wisdom and be safe so you can continue for years to come.

From: bluesman
Date: 24-May-22




Another , I carry extra batteries for my flashlight in my pack . I wrap them in Saran Wrap , I have had my flashlight and headlamp fail in the field and learned from it .

From: bluesman
Date: 24-May-22




I carry a judo always and if I sit in a tree in the evening , if I feel there is enough residual noise I’ll take a shot at a leaf on the ground at an anticipated distance the critters might come in at for practice . If it’s too quiet I’ll take the shot just before I get down , to me any practice shot is beneficial.

From: paul craig
Date: 24-May-22




Duct tape has innumerable uses, such as hole patches, blister covers, fire starter. Also, I always have 20' of light nylon rope with me.

From: carpenter
Date: 24-May-22




A Leatherman type multi tool has come in handy more than once for me.

From: DanaC
Date: 24-May-22




Frank - Nemophilist - has a good comprehensive list but I'd put "carry a day pack!" at the top of it.

I'd add 'pack a light fleece vest'. And in addition to TP I carry those wet 'baby wipes'. A small folding saw is also goodness.

From: DanaC
Date: 24-May-22




I have never regretted spending more money on *good* socks and boots. Take care of your feet, they'll carry you to the end.

From: Keefers
Date: 24-May-22




I make my own home brew string wax which I put some good Georgia pine rosin in the mix and it makes the wax extra tacky so you can really grasp the string when making a Flemish twist. What I really like to do also is use it on my shoe laces and what I do is take my laces and pull it across the wax cakes several times then burnish it into the entire string with a piece of scrap leather . Those laces will have a heart time coming undone and it will make them water resistant . Try it if you have some wax and you may like it. Great thread George and what a way to share with one another.

From: MGF
Date: 24-May-22




I see lots of posts that mention fire starting but, unless I missed it, none with advice regarding use of a fire...I hope this is useful.

I too carry multiple ways to start a fire. A fire can be fun, useful or even life saving. But it can also be a giant pain in the rear if you have to breath much smoke. Granted a rally good fire isn't very smoky but sometimes our fuel choices are limited and where there's fire there's smoke.

The answer is a correctly built "reflector". A reflector that reflects heat is nice if you're cold but there's a more important function. It creates a draft and acts like a chimney to suck the smoke away from you. When you sit by a fire for warmth and have to keep moving because the smoke seems to follow you...it really is following you.

I hope this isn't so basic that you find it insulting but when you sit by a fire, the air between you and the fire warms and rises...which draws more smoke filled air toward you. A chimney.

The idea is to put something else near the fire that's close enough and big enough to create more of a draft than you do. Then you don't breath smoke. It's really important if you try to sleep by a fire using something like a lean-to. They can really suck in the smoke!

The "reflector" could be almost anything...a big log, a stack of logs, a rock or whatever.

Putting one together can be time consuming and labor intensive depending on available materials.

These days most of my camping is out of the truck or the canoe. We got tired of gathering rocks and building a reflector only to have some know-nothing come along and tear down our good reflector to make a fire ring...I guess they enjoy breathing smoke.

I finally made one to take with me. I can carry it in the truck or canoe but it isn't a back pack thing. It's a couple pieces of sheet metal with some pieces of steel pipe welded on. I run a piece of steel rod down through the pieces of pipe (a hinge) and into the ground.

Without the truck or canoe you won't be carrying anything like that so you have to wing it. The best way is to pick a spot for your fire that has features or materials that make it easy.

The only other tip I have here is that you need to start "early". If you need a fire for warmth through the night you'll nee a bunch of fire wood. That'll require some time and labor.

From: HuumanCreed
Date: 24-May-22




Be realistic on what you NEED to carry. I'm going to also advocate against over packing. If you scouted the place you are planning to use, and its not too far from where you parked. You DONT need enough gears to survive a 3 days stalk deep into the mountain. My favorite spot last year was 300 yards from where I parked, and I had decent reception on my phone. I also pinned the location to my family. I realized I can leave my whole pack back in the car and only carry 2 knives, small first aid, snacks, water, tree hunting method and weapon. Everything else I can just go back to car to get including a sled if I'm bless with a kill. I used to carry around a 15lbs pack that had everything I could possibly needed. and 95% of the time they never get use.

From: MGF
Date: 24-May-22




Well sure as with all things, it depends. When I hunt the small woodlot behind the house, I only need my bow and what I'm wearing. I don't even need to carry a knife. If and when I need one I can just go back to the house for one. I don't need to carry much more when I'm hunting within walking distance of the truck.

I've never done any big time pack trips into the mountains or other large area. At this stage of my life I guess I never will.

What I do is overnighters on a local river in the winter. Not exactly way out in the wilderness but help isn't going to get to you very fast so your kind of on your own.

The other thing I do...though I don't know when I'll get to do it again...my wife and I will camp in the national forest. We can carry lots of stuff in the truck so camp is comfortable. But if my initially planned hunting spots don't pan out I have to start wandering. I used to pack some stuff and tell my wife not to worry until afternoon of the following day.

So here's the thinking. If I pick a spot to hunt the afternoon I'm going to want to hunt until near dark. That's some rough country. I have found high spots where a cell phone will work but it isn't the norm. Do I want to walk out in the dark? What if I shoot something? What if I think I need to wait for morning to track it?

I carry what I need to make a night out bearable and minor mishaps manageable. Everything I carry fits in a small day pack sort of thing.

From: Ricky The Cabel Guy
Date: 24-May-22

Ricky The Cabel Guy's embedded Photo



not really a tip, but something i picked up from a friend years ago. if you hunt from semi permanent stand locations, hang a suet cage on a nearby branch. the show makes those longs sits pretty entertaining.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 24-May-22




Most of my hunts anymore are just day trips and not torture testing ventures but I still carry my tracfone (boss' orders), water and snacks to hold me over in a pinch. I do love me a ziploc bag with wet paper towels inside too. :)

From: Supernaut
Date: 24-May-22




Ricky, that is a great idea. I hang suet cages at the house but never thought of hanging one for viewing pleasure at my hunting spot.

From: the Black Spot
Date: 24-May-22




When going out in far back country; take a topo map of the area

I always carry a New Testament Bible with me if I am sitting for a while.

Those contact lenses cases work great for small items(pain pills, lip balm, etc)

From: Rick Barbee
Date: 24-May-22




Ricky The Cabel Guy:

Not only is it entertaining, but the game animals get distracted by the birds when they are hanging around, and that helps you out a lot when trying to get a shot.

I mix small grains into my feeder just for such purpose, and it works.

Rick

From: MCNSC
Date: 24-May-22




Most of my hunting is from a tree stand. I tie a knot in the end of my safety lanyard ( the one around the tree) if I need to put my bow down for whatever reason I just put that knot between the string and limb and the bow will hang from that. May not work with a longbow but works well with a recurve. Also on my pull up rope I tie a loop in the end. Put this loop between the string and limb and then place the loop over the limb tip. Keeps from having any hardware on the rope to make noise or scratch your bow.

From: Buzz
Date: 24-May-22




Ditto carpenter.

From: Snow Crow
Date: 24-May-22




Cable Guy-

That is brilliant! I'm a bird feeding nerd around the house, but never thought of taking the show on the trail so to speak.

From: Darryl/Deni
Date: 24-May-22




It may sound silly but I always carry a spare pair of boot laces, the long heavy duty type. I always seem to have one break at the worst time and have used them for other things a lot such as tying limbs out of a shooting lane I did not trim to well or tying anything for that matter.

From: Orion Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 24-May-22




I tie a 6-8-inch length of dental floss into our very close to the upper loop of my bow string to act as a wind inceptor. When I'm still hunting, I usually carry the bow under my left arm, and the upper limb tip is in front of me. The string enables me to keep a constant watch on the wind.

I also tie a similar length piece behind the broadhead on my no. 1 arrow. Then, when I stop for a while and nock an arrow or when I nock an arrow and hang my bow in a tree while on stand, I can watch that string to keep track of the wind.

The latter has often helped me decide when to take a shot as a critter was moving in position to wind me.

From: Orion Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 24-May-22




Wind indicator, not inceptor. I could do without autocorrect.

From: heftyhunter
Date: 24-May-22




Small piece of rough side Velcro on the hood of your quiver to hold milk weed. Or soak some cotton in bright koolade to test wind. Easier to see. Small wrap of reflective tape between nock and feathers. Paper towel not toliet paper.

From: heftyhunter
Date: 24-May-22




If right handed cut of left side chest pocket and sew on pant leg to rest bow tip in. On hunting stool put the big rubber stoppers from crutches on the legs. Zip ties on your pants zipper. Big wide rubber bands for upper arms when wearing bulky clothes. A piece of trot line with an S hook in case you drop your bow out of your stand.

From: Frisky
Date: 25-May-22




If you have a noisy bow, raise your brace height. You might be pleasantly surprised!

Learn to use a butcher's steel instead of a stone to sharpen your knives.

Joe

From: bluesman
Date: 25-May-22




If you have to turn your head when sitting on the ground or in a tree , use your eyes first by scanning as far as you can peripherally , then turn very very slow a few inches ,stop and repeat . Slow short movement is harder to detect than a normal turn of the head . Deer will pick you off with normal movement of your head .

From: DanaC
Date: 25-May-22




Darryl/Deni, boot laces is fine, but I've used paracord as a substitute boot lace and that works too. Either way, useful items for the pack.

If you have a GPS, get a bearing to your destination, set that on your compass, and use that to make your way. Then you're not waiting for the GPS to find satellites. Proceed a ways, then re-set the compass, in case you've veered of course a bit. Saves batteries too.

From: Jon Stewart
Date: 25-May-22

Jon Stewart's embedded Photo



Make your own owl hooter. 1/4 " copper and a small juice can.

From: Jon Stewart
Date: 25-May-22

Jon Stewart's embedded Photo



Keep your file in this pvc. Makes it easy to find in your archery tool box.

From: Ramjet
Date: 25-May-22




For blood trailing or trail markers I use clothes pins painted fluorescent orange with reflective tacks or tape. Works day or night and easily removed.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 25-May-22




To add a little to Roger's above tip about markers, if you use them to find your way to your stand prior to daylight, put them as close to the ground as is possible, so the flashlight beam isn't spreading so far in the woods.

From: Bassmaster
Date: 25-May-22




You can never be to thin,or have to much money. Burt Reynolds quote.

From: Nemophilist
Date: 25-May-22

Nemophilist's embedded Photo



I use a Smith and Wesson Galaxy flashlight for getting to and from my stand. It has red, green, and blue filters. I use the red filter when going into my stand site and the blue filter for blood tracking. I rarely use the white led mode.

From: Tim Cousineau
Date: 25-May-22

Tim Cousineau's embedded Photo



Here's a cheap judo with an old rifle casing and weed whacker string. Glue the casing on the shaft, drill 2 holes and insert the string. The holes should be about the same diameter or slightly smaller than the string.

From: Silverhead
Date: 25-May-22




find a working fridge( lots of remodeling) take out the trays and racks..fasten hooks inside to hang deer quarters from. Never have to worry about " too warm" again. Simple but a game changer for those of us who process our own..Bye for Now

From: Wudstix Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 25-May-22




Another Firestarter item is a Ziploc bag of wood arrow taper shavings.

From: Carpdaddy
Date: 25-May-22

Carpdaddy's embedded Photo



I like the snap on quiver style I used back during my wheelie bow days but don’t want to drill holes in my riser. Double sided Gorilla tape has filled the bill nicely. You can removed the mount without damage, put them on other bows, and treestands. Also I converted this small three arrow quiver into a five arrow with minor work.

From: Tomas
Date: 26-May-22




A small roll of birch bark stuffed with dryer lint makes a fool proof fire starter.

From: Catskills
Date: 26-May-22




If you carry a small flask of Everclear (grain alcohol) it is an excellent antiseptic and a small splash on your dryer lint guarantees the fire starting. I don't drink it, usually, but you can put a dash in your soda if you want to.

From: Wapiti - - M. S. Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 27-May-22




I carry zip ties, if not for ground blind material.Then i use it when buttons break off, or snaps or zippers break.I use a striker like one for welding for sparks for fire starter.I carry heavy duty plastic bags they have a lot of uses. I use them mostly for quick instant hip boots. Or a make shift poncho, when caught in a rain storm.Great posted thread George.

From: MGF
Date: 27-May-22




Speaking of fire starters...try a potato chip or a corn chip. Those greasy things burn great and burning them might be healthier than eating them.

From: Billy Knight
Date: 27-May-22




Put flea and tick collars for dogs on you pant's leg. No more ticks.

From: Tomas
Date: 27-May-22




Wear your compass around your neck with a soft shoelace, you'll never lose it and it's always at your fingertips.

From: Wapiti - - M. S. Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 27-May-22




Have tried or used alot that's being posted, others will be interesting to try or use. Interesting thread George!

From: Papadeerhtr
Date: 28-May-22




No matter how cold it is, on way to my stand. I never put my coat on until I'm settled in my stand and start to feel chilled. That way I stay much warmer.

From: Bluebell
Date: 28-May-22




Try coffee mate for starting fires. Best use I have found fot it.

Hugh

From: Babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 28-May-22




Pdidly . Huh? I swear I read that. It’s a good idea. Go have another drink buddy

From: Don T. Lewis
Date: 28-May-22

Don T. Lewis's embedded Photo



Lance gave me a few tips on how to get this Barlow knife back together. Thanks Lance!

From: Don T. Lewis
Date: 28-May-22

Don T. Lewis's embedded Photo



Crookedstix gave me a few tips on wine cap mushrooms. Thanks Kerry!

From: DanaC
Date: 29-May-22




A scarf or a neck gaiter will buy you a fair amount of warmth. Try folding a hand warmer in it and setting against the back of your neck.

From: Blue Duck
Date: 29-May-22




Flushable hand wipes are better than TP.

From: Altitude Sickness
Date: 29-May-22




In the hills and Mountains trim your toe nails often. And when buying boots make sure your toes are at least 1/2” from the end of the toe box. When laced correctly, the boot should hold your foot from sliding to the front on steep declines.

From: ShortStick
Date: 29-May-22




Do you have antler burr limb bolts that keep coming loose? Give the bolts about 4-5 wraps of Megatape. The grey plumbers tape to the bolts. That'll help to keep them tight. And I carry a bundle of 100 marker flags in my pack when hunting. They work great when tracking a blood trail, especially in the dark and the trail starts to petter out.

From: HEXX
Date: 29-May-22




I use a heated vest for cold weather up in my climber. I don't use a hunting knife for

deer just my swiss army pocket knife with a wood cutting blade for limbs that get in the

way.

From: R.grider
Date: 29-May-22




For wind indicators , use the fluffy string floss, has puffy middle with string handles on each end. Fasten in string with one end, cut the string handle end off on the other end. Also, the arrow holders that self adhese to riser of your bow always tend to come off, use velcrow patches between it and riser, it gives enough that it never comes loose, plus you can easily transfer from on bow to another.

From: Nemophilist
Date: 30-May-22




Here is a good tip to remember. When asking or taking advice listen to the people who can prove they are successful at what they do no matter what it is, and not to people who just say they are.

Also 0000 steel wool makes a great fire starter.

From: DanaC
Date: 30-May-22




Cut the sleeves off an old thermal shirt, makes a light vest that takes up almost no room in your daypack but buys you 'core warmth' for an evening sit when the sun is dropping.

From: Babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 30-May-22




Nemo x2. And carry a small camera or cell phone for pics

From: Tdwhip
Date: 30-May-22




When Elk hunting we leave camp wearing head lamps. When it’s time to put it into your pack for the day take one battery out and put it back in backwards. This way there is no way it can accidentally get turn on. When you need it, turn the battery around and you good to go.

From: onager Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 30-May-22




Very good post idea Mr. Stout: Many very good tips here, I've read thru the entire string. I do agree with and use many of them. A few additional that work for me: I went to a Cat Quiver set up around 15 years ago. I've killed deer with it on, no problem. I have three broadheads and one Judo in it. I have a single arrow "quiver" on the bow, with black fletching for a quick backup arrow. Black fletching to be not seen, especially by turkeys. I have a rain jacket in the top pocket of the Cat Quiver for the obvious and in the case of warmth if stuck overnight, accident etc. I use a headlamp and carry a quality small flashlight as back up as well as four spare batteries. I learned the need for two lights on a mountain trail when my companions' headlamp went out and he couldn't see to replace them without me there. Real compasses are handy when GPS not working due to dead batteries too. Also learned that on top of a mountain with TWO companions with dead batteries. Ha! Two compasses even on a small property, in case of a drag out in the dark, no moon. Compact first aid kit, bandaids, antibiotic ointment and tweezers for thorns etc. Roll of black electrical tape, for a repair and possible bandaging. Spare set-up backup string, stringer and spare tabs. I like white sewing thread tied onto my broadheads. Dental floss is too heavy. That way I can watch the breeze by just moving my eyes to the arrow point. I also carry, as mentioned above, a fixed blade knife to dress game. Folders are a big job to clean up. Pocket knife in pocket. Wear a rescue whistle around your neck as well as the compass. And one more thing, keep your cell phone in your shirt pocket. Last year a young friend did, fortunately, rather than as his usual in his pack, hung on tree. When he fell he was able to call for help, otherwise he may have laid there for many more hours with very serious injures. Be careful, have fun, John

From: mangonboat
Date: 30-May-22




Tip 1: If you carry all the things recommended in this thread out to your blind, you can operate a small dry-goods store and deli out of your pack while waiting on game to come. Tip 2: Do deliberate research to learn about thermals and other factors that influence wind and learn how to study weather maps and forecasts, then use that knowledge gained to think through where and when to hunt , whether to still hunt or sit and/or to locate your blind or stand.

From: Osr144
Date: 30-May-22

Osr144's embedded Photo



One for you folk who make your own arrows.I make my own arrows shafts ,and knocks too I mostly just glue In a horn reinforcement just like others do.On occasions I will make hardwood knocks .Mostly Australian hard woods.I am currently using Ebony.This is expensive and can be hard to find for sale.I came appon an old piano and removed all the black Keys along with the ivory.I just made some knock plugs from the Ebony keys.The ivory I will use for standard reinforcements.Here is a picture of my first Ebony knock plugs and an old Red box wood knock I previously made.I get 2 knock plugs per black key.I have a centre drill jig and these will glue in nicely to my arrows.Then all thats required is to shape my knock. Osr

From: Brad Lehmann
Date: 03-Jun-22




Carry an Emory board or two. It is amazing how quickly you can touch up a knife or broad head edge using the fine grit side.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 03-Jun-22




People can pick and choose what they carry, and most I know really don't burden themselves with a lot of "stuff" they won't really neeed. My fanny pack is loaded all the time with the same stuff, and weighs well less than 4# so I won't be opening any dry goods stores :), but then I already did that in the 80's and some of the 90's.

I love to hear other folk's ideas for what and why they carry something. It's easy to dismiss it if it's not for you as well. I like to have what I need, and a few things I probably won't, but may wish I had taken at some point had I not packed them. I can still carry plenty for a 76-year-old, and still have an extra turkey feather on my quiver for good measure. Your mileage of course may, and probably will vary.

Keep 'em coming.

From: Linecutter
Date: 03-Jun-22




I buy a cheap water proof battery Analog Wrist Watch that uses a buckle strap. Cut off all but about 1/2"-3/4" of the strap per side, then use the cut straps to tape it to my bow. Water proof Analog Watches are not affected by cold and wet as much as Digital Watches. Always know what time it is without digging up under my sleeve. If you carry stuff to start a fire, carry some Fat Wood it will help extend the initial fire if every thing is wet out side. Where I hunt there is hardly any pine. Carry a exlarge handkerchief, you can use it to tie off wounds, wipe sweat, wet it to cool you off, or use as a head cover. If you get stuck out over night and you have to start a fire and there is water near by, a empty pop can, can be used to boil water in. You can use the handkerchief to take the can out of the fire. DANNY

From: shortdraw
Date: 03-Jun-22




I agree George. This a great thread with a lot of great ideas. Everyone can pick up something from it. Thanks George

From: Stick
Date: 03-Jun-22




I have left my elk bugle many times where I was sitting and had to walk back and look for it...so now I put one wrap of orange duck tape around it...stands out and I usually see it saving me alot of walking. Most seat cushions are bulky for long treks, so I carry a camo poncho and fold it up for a seat to keep my butt dry when elk hunting since we walk so far from the truck.

From: scndwfstlhntng Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 04-Jun-22




My most important tips are: 1. Always put your usual hunting items that go into your pants pockets and onto your belt in the same place. I can always run down my check list and quickly know if I misplaced, forgot to replace, or lost my basic items that I “need “ for ever hunt: shooting glove, arm guard, face mask, hat(s), gloves, kerchief, pocket knife, belt knife, flashlight. 2. Car key holder. If I drive to a hunt, I have to decide whether I feel comfortable sticking my keys on a tire, or I want to keep them in my pocket. I have fortunately never dropped my keys but other stuff has certainly dropped or fallen out of a pocket and been lost. I now just use a piece of string and put loops on both ends. I loop one end through my key ring and the other through a belt loop. Usable over and over all season and cut to the length desired. 3. Fogging glasses: for all of us that need glasses, this is always a winter PIA. The liquids always seem leave a film. I have been using dry wipes for years with fairly good results, and although not perfect they are the best solution that I have found. The last few years I have been able to get them from REI at about $2 a package





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