Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


How do you handle property line hunters?

Messages posted to thread:
Butch 04-Jan-21
Verdeburl 04-Jan-21
fdp 04-Jan-21
Great Falls 04-Jan-21
4nolz@work 04-Jan-21
Ollie 04-Jan-21
Dan In MI 04-Jan-21
George D. Stout 04-Jan-21
fdp 04-Jan-21
bigdog21 04-Jan-21
GlassPowered Hoosier 04-Jan-21
Sawtooth (Original) 04-Jan-21
Kwikdraw 04-Jan-21
LBshooter 04-Jan-21
Beauxhunter 04-Jan-21
Ricky The Cabel Guy 04-Jan-21
Krag 04-Jan-21
Joey Ward 04-Jan-21
bigdog21 04-Jan-21
SteveD 04-Jan-21
Butch 04-Jan-21
9/10 Broke 04-Jan-21
Dartwick 04-Jan-21
Jon Stewart 04-Jan-21
NBK 04-Jan-21
Woods Walker 04-Jan-21
goldentrout_one 04-Jan-21
Realwarrior 04-Jan-21
babysaph 04-Jan-21
2 bears 05-Jan-21
bowhunt 05-Jan-21
Sawtooth (Original) 05-Jan-21
JamesV 05-Jan-21
Ricky The Cabel Guy 05-Jan-21
Brassbandit 05-Jan-21
JimG 05-Jan-21
hawkeye in PA 05-Jan-21
Loubeck 05-Jan-21
papabear 05-Jan-21
B arthur 05-Jan-21
PEARL DRUMS 05-Jan-21
GUTPILEPA 05-Jan-21
fishin coyote 05-Jan-21
George D. Stout 05-Jan-21
RymanCat 05-Jan-21
Butch 05-Jan-21
Eric Krewson 05-Jan-21
Bassman 05-Jan-21
fdp 05-Jan-21
Big Nine 05-Jan-21
Ricky The Cabel Guy 05-Jan-21
Missouribreaks 05-Jan-21
GF 05-Jan-21
Krag 05-Jan-21
Sasquatch73 05-Jan-21
Okaw 05-Jan-21
Silverback 05-Jan-21
D31 05-Jan-21
babysaph 05-Jan-21
Yeller 05-Jan-21
Sparky 05-Jan-21
Kansasclipper 05-Jan-21
GLF 05-Jan-21
woodsman 05-Jan-21
Plugneck 05-Jan-21
Dan In MI 05-Jan-21
Dartwick 05-Jan-21
Ricky The Cabel Guy 05-Jan-21
Bob 05-Jan-21
Trad PA 05-Jan-21
Trad PA 05-Jan-21
Yellah Nocks 05-Jan-21
Jon Stewart 05-Jan-21
Krag 05-Jan-21
JusPassin 05-Jan-21
cut it out 05-Jan-21
cut it out 05-Jan-21
babysaph 05-Jan-21
Rick Barbee 05-Jan-21
JusPassin 05-Jan-21
Eric Krewson 05-Jan-21
Boker 05-Jan-21
Bentstick81 05-Jan-21
hickory 05-Jan-21
brush ape 05-Jan-21
Brian Phillips 05-Jan-21
babysaph 05-Jan-21
Stumpkiller 05-Jan-21
kstout 06-Jan-21
Zildjian51 06-Jan-21
Surveyor61 06-Jan-21
msinc 06-Jan-21
Brassbandit 06-Jan-21
GUTPILEPA 06-Jan-21
Okaw 06-Jan-21
swampwalker 06-Jan-21
fdp 06-Jan-21
GLF 06-Jan-21
GLF 06-Jan-21
tradmt 06-Jan-21
swampwalker 06-Jan-21
TrapperKayak 06-Jan-21
TrapperKayak 06-Jan-21
TrapperKayak 06-Jan-21
Ricky The Cabel Guy 06-Jan-21
swampwalker 06-Jan-21
Butch 06-Jan-21
Brassbandit 06-Jan-21
JimG 07-Jan-21
9/10 Broke 07-Jan-21
Krag 07-Jan-21
fdp 07-Jan-21
Krag 07-Jan-21
Dartwick 07-Jan-21
fdp 07-Jan-21
South Farm 07-Jan-21
swampwalker 07-Jan-21
Ricky The Cabel Guy 07-Jan-21
JimG 07-Jan-21
swampwalker 07-Jan-21
Stan 07-Jan-21
Rick Barbee 07-Jan-21
JimG 07-Jan-21
swampwalker 07-Jan-21
Dartwick 07-Jan-21
JimG 07-Jan-21
GUTPILEPA 07-Jan-21
Boker 07-Jan-21
babysaph 07-Jan-21
swampwalker 07-Jan-21
JimG 07-Jan-21
babysaph 07-Jan-21
TrapperKayak 07-Jan-21
swampwalker 08-Jan-21
olddogrib 08-Jan-21
Beauxhunter 08-Jan-21
9/10 Broke 08-Jan-21
swampwalker 08-Jan-21
Butch 08-Jan-21
Sparky 09-Jan-21
VTer 09-Jan-21
tradmt 09-Jan-21
GLF 09-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 09-Jan-21
Sparky 09-Jan-21
tradmt 12-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 12-Jan-21
Outdoors94 12-Jan-21
RymanCat 12-Jan-21
Wispershot 12-Jan-21
GLF 12-Jan-21
Rick Barbee 12-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 12-Jan-21
SteveD 12-Jan-21
GLF 12-Jan-21
JimG 13-Jan-21
JHPope 13-Jan-21
selstickbow 13-Jan-21
GLF 13-Jan-21
JimG 13-Jan-21
tradmt 13-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 13-Jan-21
Rick Barbee 13-Jan-21
r.grider 13-Jan-21
PECO 13-Jan-21
PECO 13-Jan-21
lv2bohunt 13-Jan-21
r.grider 13-Jan-21
tradmt 13-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 13-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 13-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 13-Jan-21
4406v 13-Jan-21
NY Yankee 13-Jan-21
Josh/PA 13-Jan-21
BigOzzie 13-Jan-21
BigOzzie 13-Jan-21
swampwalker 13-Jan-21
Rick Barbee 13-Jan-21
GLF 13-Jan-21
Beauxhunter 13-Jan-21
Andy Man 13-Jan-21
GLF 13-Jan-21
Andy Man 13-Jan-21
swampwalker 13-Jan-21
deerhunt51 14-Jan-21
rxbob 14-Jan-21
Ricky The Cabel Guy 14-Jan-21
soap creek 14-Jan-21
swampwalker 14-Jan-21
deerhunt51 14-Jan-21
GLF 14-Jan-21
Josh/PA 14-Jan-21
Will tell 14-Jan-21
SteveBNY 14-Jan-21
Brassbandit 14-Jan-21
swampwalker 15-Jan-21
Pappy 1952 15-Jan-21
Beauxhunter 15-Jan-21
tradmt 15-Jan-21
swampwalker 15-Jan-21
Rick Barbee 15-Jan-21
9/10 Broke 15-Jan-21
grizz 15-Jan-21
bluesman 15-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 15-Jan-21
Danny Pyle 15-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 15-Jan-21
GLF 15-Jan-21
swampwalker 15-Jan-21
GLF 15-Jan-21
Danny Pyle 15-Jan-21
swampwalker 15-Jan-21
Dan In MI 15-Jan-21
Danny Pyle 15-Jan-21
Danny Pyle 15-Jan-21
swampwalker 15-Jan-21
tradmt 15-Jan-21
swampwalker 15-Jan-21
Nemophilist 15-Jan-21
swampwalker 15-Jan-21
George D. Stout 15-Jan-21
GLF 15-Jan-21
swampwalker 15-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 15-Jan-21
Rick Barbee 15-Jan-21
zonic 15-Jan-21
grizz 15-Jan-21
zonic 15-Jan-21
bluesman 15-Jan-21
tagalong2 15-Jan-21
grizz 15-Jan-21
broken arrow 15-Jan-21
GLF 15-Jan-21
bluesman 16-Jan-21
GF 16-Jan-21
Beauxhunter 16-Jan-21
grizz 16-Jan-21
swampwalker 16-Jan-21
Beauxhunter 16-Jan-21
swampwalker 16-Jan-21
swampwalker 16-Jan-21
swampwalker 16-Jan-21
Brassbandit 16-Jan-21
Thumper-tx 16-Jan-21
From: Butch
Date: 04-Jan-21




It seems like it is getting more and more common for hunters who lease or purchase adjacent property to place tree stands or ground blinds right on the property line. In some instances it can become a safety/ethical issue as well as a real aggravation. Does anyone else have to deal with this issue?

From: Verdeburl
Date: 04-Jan-21




Set up right in on your property facing into your property. There is nothing they can do, or you can do as long as you stay off of each others property. After ruining a few hunts they usually leave.

From: fdp
Date: 04-Jan-21




If they are on their property there is basically nothing you can do unless you can prove they have broken a law or created a safety hazard.

Ethics aren't laws.

From: Great Falls
Date: 04-Jan-21




Hopefully they’re decent , like able people and you can work it out without a much drama (beer is the great equalizer) good luck !

From: 4nolz@work
Date: 04-Jan-21




It's best to try to discuss it before entering a pizsing contest.But yeah it's annoying.Where are your stands?

From: Ollie Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 04-Jan-21




Posting new “no tresspassing” signs is a good way to let fence sitters know you do not appreciate their presence. Dropping a few trees and piling up brush to block the trails they are set up on sends a message you do not care for fence sitters. I have friends that will cut wood or shoot squirrels on their side of the fence during prime time.

From: Dan In MI
Date: 04-Jan-21




So how do you handle farm fields with no other cover?

From: George D. Stout
Date: 04-Jan-21




If it's on their land, then it's really their choice I believe. I sure wouldn't harrass them about it. Just hunt another area of your property.

From: fdp
Date: 04-Jan-21




You know the only time that I had an issue with stands on a property line was when I wanted to put a stand on my property line. My neighbor had a stand a few yards away.

We just simply came to an agreement. Not really that big a thing.

From: bigdog21
Date: 04-Jan-21




If there not on your property let them hunt would be my choice. they have rights also. if the deer are coming from you to them, and you needed, you could cut them off. but realy not worth starting trouble.

From: GlassPowered Hoosier
Date: 04-Jan-21




Show up on your side with an air horn, shotgun, or boom box. Fly by on an ATV or truck like a teenager.

In my experience most hunters like them aren’t hardcore enough and will just climb down after it and try another day. Or just won’t show up again. Persistence pays off. It’s unfortunate that it happens in the first place, its why public land exists in my opinion. If you don’t like someone messing with your hunt, go somewhere else or buy your own land and feel our pain when some punk decides to buddy up next to your fence line.

From: Sawtooth (Original) Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 04-Jan-21




Ask them nice to get off the line. Form a mutual agreement. If that fails, borrow or buy a two cycle dirt bike and ride the property lines at daylight and dusk. I’ve done that before. A CR250 makes a lot of noise. I’ve had to do that before. It works.

From: Kwikdraw
Date: 04-Jan-21




On a lease in S. Texas, a few years ago, it was agreed by and adhered to by all ranch owners, that no stand or feeder could be hunted closer than 500' from any property line. One leaser on our East fence built a stand and feeder about 50' from our fence line. Our ranch manager, the next morning, doused it w/ gasoline and you know the rest! He called the owner of the ranch, informed him, and said owner promptly threw the rude crew off his property, for good! On most Hill Country TX property, the rule is 50 to 100', depending on the size tracts of land. Don't know how small parcels are handled, but probably property line violations abound. Some tracts are so small, it's impossible to not be close, so an agreement between owners should be worked out amicably.

From: LBshooter
Date: 04-Jan-21




Of course, as we all know fence lines are edges for deer and they like to travel them. As mentioned, have a chat and work out a schedule but if your talking to a lessor I think your going to have a hard time.

If all else fails , kill them and bury them on thier side of the fence;) For all who think I'm joking, I AM.about burying them. Lol

From: Beauxhunter
Date: 04-Jan-21




It would seem to me if you are not hunting on the property line yourself their presence would not be an issue to you. It’s their land they can hunt it how they feel. If you are bothered by it you should find another stand location.

From: Ricky The Cabel Guy
Date: 04-Jan-21




i always figured that when I start kicking in for my neighbors taxes, i can start telling him what part of his land he shouldn't hunt on.

From: Krag
Date: 04-Jan-21




Many states have hunter harassment laws in place. Probably doesn't matter that you are also a hunter and doing the harassing from your own property.

From: Joey Ward
Date: 04-Jan-21




After season, go in and run 4 new strands of barbed wire to create a new property line. Next season they won’t know any better and you’ve just added new acreage to your property.

From: bigdog21
Date: 04-Jan-21




IF he is leasing it you need to talk to owner. not the leaser are hunter.

From: SteveD Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 04-Jan-21




Nothing to do about it. What's the purpose of having property lines? Are they for creating a no hunting zone or what? Sheesh hunting has turned in a direction that doesn't bode well in the future, at least thats what I'm sensing anymore.

From: Butch
Date: 04-Jan-21




Thanks for the comments/advice-- what I have tried to do with fence line hunters is come to an agreement--I'll stay 50 yards away from my fence line if you do the same--that will give us a 100 yard safety buffer. Some agree--some don't. I have grandkids that exclusively bowhunt some of my property and that is why I have a concern about safety--especially during the firearms season. In one case of a lease, the hunters lease 200 acres that butt up to my property-- 197.5 acres is tillable ground and 2.5 acres (that butts up to my property) has brush and small trees on it--guess where they place all of their stands.

From: 9/10 Broke Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 04-Jan-21




Until a few years ago it was illegal in Alabama to hunt over bait. The adjoining property to me was leased and the guys that were leasing were setting up right on the property line right in my honey hole I had been hunting for years. It is a great spot so I was pretty fired up about it. Decided to pour out a bunch of corn and then call the game warden. Well the game warden never came and there is no telling how many deer those boys killed. Hehe. Best to just get there first and wear your orange. They’ll give up and find somewhere else to hunt.

From: Dartwick
Date: 04-Jan-21




If the stand itself is on their own property. And they are facing such that they see their own property - its none of your business unless you want to make a deal.

I guess people see it different in places with 1000 acre tracks. The lots I tend to hunt are much smaller.

From: Jon Stewart
Date: 04-Jan-21




Not much you can do if they don,t break the trespass law BUT in Michigan you can be arrested for hunter harassment for intentionally doing some of the things that have been suggested on here, loud music, airhorns, etc

From: NBK
Date: 04-Jan-21




We have a decent chunk of land bordered on three sides by other private property. My first order of business was to call them directly, invite them for a few beers and have a civil discussion basically to show them that we're not #%¥holes and are willing to work together for mutual benefit (i.e. we now share some boundary roads that transect both properties). I now consider them friends, have zero issues and still get together for beers. An earnest handshake and a smile still carries some weight.

From: Woods Walker
Date: 04-Jan-21

Woods Walker's embedded Photo



What George said. That, and maybe put these signs up....

From: goldentrout_one
Date: 04-Jan-21




Wow, it's not enough that you own your own land, you want to own/control the land within 50 to 100 feet of your property line. If you don't want them hunting at that exact spot, just buy or lease that land, and problem solved.

From: Realwarrior Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 04-Jan-21




I don't have a problem with my neighbors hunting the property lines. I did have a problem with one Hunter placing a stand on the property line facing INTO my property. I went in during the season and cut trees everyday that his truck went up the road. I also told his uncle that if he shot a deer he was not to enter my land to recover it. He quit hunting the fence line. If his stand was facing into his land I absolutely would not have cared. We hunt our land from the outside in. If I don't want you hunting within 3 yards of the property lines, maybe you don't want me hunting within 300 yards of it... Who is right? Whose paying taxes on those 3 yards?

From: babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 04-Jan-21




How do you know they are near the property line?

From: 2 bears
Date: 05-Jan-21




I have only had one incident & it worked out all in my favor. Many years ago I was gun hunting on a new lease. There was an old well established tower stand at the head of a canyon. The tower was only 50' from the fence but faced down in a long brushy canyon that widened out and ran all the way to a field some 500 + yards away and below. It looked perfect. About 30 minutes waiting, with high expectations, AFTER sunrise a red jeep with 4 talking hunters drove up the fence line and over to a stand about 50 yards the other side of the fence. They talked in loud voices. Just one hour later here comes the jeep again and picked up the hunter. They discussed the morning hunt then drove off to pick up the other hunters. I thought my plans were ruined and this lease was a joke. Unhappy to say the least. It wasn't 30 minutes later a nice 8 point walked by just feet in front of that stand then turned and angled down the hill. I thought about it for maybe 30 seconds. Well those idiots are back in camp. I dumped that buck left my rifle in the stand ran over there and drug him maybe 30 yards & under the fence. I never even felt bad about it after them (RUINING ) my hunt. ;^) I try to stick with a bow, and away from fence lines now. Don't want to have to trail a buck on adjoining property.>>>>----> Ken light the flames ;^)

From: bowhunt
Date: 05-Jan-21




Seems like some of the solutions offered here to guys hunting the property line are actually worse than the guy hunting the property line.

I think I would like member NBK for my neighbor.Sounds reasonable and pragmatic.Should not be a Hatfields and McCoys mentality when resolving dispuits.Then nobodies happy.

From: Sawtooth (Original) Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 05-Jan-21




It is apparent that there are two well defined ideas concerning this dilemma. I can tell by reading the posts who owns land and who does not.

From: JamesV
Date: 05-Jan-21




I was told that if I hung a stand on a boundry tree on an Alabama managment area it should face the managment area.

James

From: Ricky The Cabel Guy
Date: 05-Jan-21




if a farmer can farm all of his land, why cant a hunter hunt all of his?

From: Brassbandit
Date: 05-Jan-21




Wow, lot of childish advice here, lots of it would get you a visit from fish and game and a charge.

Who cares if they are setup on a property line? Are they shooting into your property? No? Then pound sand. Fence lines and corners make wicked funnels.

Childish.

From: JimG
Date: 05-Jan-21




Wow, just wow?!?!

Some of these responses just baffle me. So some of you want to control ALL of the property you own/lease BUT also want control of some of the property your neighbors own/lease as well?!?!

Some of you need to grow up. Really. So your neighbor puts a stand up on the property line and your answer is to cause noise or divert game trails to ruin their hunts? How about you worry about you and let your neighbor worry about him.

Got news for some of you. YOU don't own the deer. Deer have a home range that covers 1 to 5 square miles. So unless you own multiple sections of land, the deer ain't yours.

Brassbandit said it best "CHILDISH".

From: hawkeye in PA
Date: 05-Jan-21




Have a good non hunting friend (has horses with posted property) that has had this problem, treestands in the fence row that divides farm property. Fence row is in a hay field clearly in view of non hunters house. The hunter had permission for other farm. At the hearing it was determined the fence row trees where neutral as neither land owner had planted them. It was not a safety zone issue. The language and abrasiveness of the hunter didn't help any of us.

The hunter eventually lost "thee Buck" when he shot it and it died on the front lawn of the non hunters house. Police and game commission determined it had been shot on the wrong side of fence row by blood and hoof marks. Game commission took the buck.

From: Loubeck
Date: 05-Jan-21




It depends, are they going over or under your fence? The under fence type tend to look better on film

From: papabear
Date: 05-Jan-21




I have the same problem and have for many years. It aggravates me but there is nothing you can do, Our land is the best and deer bed here, They come out to feed in neighbors fields and the property line fellers shoot the deer. I've even had them ask to retrieve deer they shot this way when they die on our land. I always say yes. It's just one of those pains in the ass.

From: B arthur
Date: 05-Jan-21




I own my own land and I don't post it. I've found life is more enjoyable when you learn to get along with your neighbors. If you want to hunt my property line, have at it. If you want to hunt my property please ask, we will work something out.

From: PEARL DRUMS
Date: 05-Jan-21




You never know when you or yours may have to cross that fence to find a dead critter. I wouldn't make waves unless shots are fired or trespassing occurs. Staying civil with next door hunters is key to everybody enjoying their hunting time.

From: GUTPILEPA
Date: 05-Jan-21




Well I guess I’m guilty of that cause I will hunt on game lands right next to a private property line and there is nothing the land owner can do there is no law saying you can’t look in to someone else’s property.

From: fishin coyote
Date: 05-Jan-21




I'm a line sitter. As a small 10 acre property owner my property is long and narrow. So by some of the previous posts I'd never be able to hunt my own land that I pay/paid for.

The 1st thing I did when I bought the place was talk to my 5 neighboring land owners. 2 didn't care where I set up and in fact said you can hunt ours also if you want. 1 was a club that I joined and the other 2 although posted after I introduced myself said if I needed to retrieve any deer to go ahead.

I guess my point in this would be that there are a thousand reasons why guys line sit and sometimes it's out of necessity.

Life is to short to and communication goes a long way in resolving any issues/expectations.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 05-Jan-21




We own 113 acres of mountain land so we can speak from experience. We don't fight with our neighbors and we don't tell anyone where to hunt or where not to hunt. It's a respect thing and we've never had problems. Funny how that usually works out.

From: RymanCat
Date: 05-Jan-21




If they face your property they are on your property. If they face their property they are on theirs.

Now with that said you need to get along with them and have an agreement that they can enter or you enter if you down or are looking for one but that don't mean they hunt it in or out.

That should round it out for you or your going to have a dust out.

All depends on whos balls are bigger too when problems arise and they will.

From: Butch
Date: 05-Jan-21




Just some clarification-- The farmer that owns the 200 acres that butts up to my land is a long time friend that goes back many many years. He is not a hunter nor is any of his family. He recently leased out his 200 acres to 4 young hunters which certainly is not a problem-- yet. The young hunters use xbows and high powered rifles which have become legal in Indiana in recent years. The population density in my part of the state makes the use of a high power rifle for deer hunting questionable.

My motives are not to tell other hunters where they must hunt nor to control someone else's land, but to create a safe hunting environment for all concerned. I personally do not hunt my property in question, but it is hunted exclusively by my grandkids.

We have had some firearm hunting accidents in our area (thankfully no deaths) and I can assure that if an accident does occur on a landowner's property, regardless of the circumstances, in the end, the landowner will be held liable - - the lawyers know how to pursue the money trail!

My friend, who owns the 200 acres, is well aware of the liability we share as landowners and has talked to the young leasees about safety issues, but I still fear that good judgment may be forgotten when a deer appears--thus my question to you about property line hunters.

From: Eric Krewson
Date: 05-Jan-21




Hunters are stupid for the most part, we had 160 acres of private land in the middle of thousands of acres of public land. It wasn't uncommon for hunters to drive through 5000 acres of great public land to trespass and hunt on our cut over brush patch with few deer, it happened several time a year. I guess they thought because we leased the land it must be something special.

I have watched several fence sitters from a distance, they never look at the land they have permission to hunt and keep a close eye on land they don't have permission to hunt.

One time I watched a guy in permanent stand at the edge of a management area. It was bow hunting only on the management area. The private side was a cut cornfield, the management side was a beautiful oak thicket full of deer and pig trails with the ground covered with acorns.

The guy in the stand never looked at the corn field and stayed facing the management area with his 06. I was up a tree about 40 yards away with my selfbow, he never saw me.

Realizing he would shoot anything that showed up on the management area, I shouted at him "the management area isn't open for gun hunting". He looked up, saw me, got down from the stand and took off running, a sure sign he was up to no good.

It has been my finding from running huge hunting clubs that only about 10% of all hunters are ethical, the rest will do anything they can get away with if they don't think they will get caught.

In 50 years of hunting I have never shot across someone else's fence unless I got permission from the owner first.

A couple of years ago a huge buck came across my property and caught me off guard, by the time I slipped up to him he was across the property line of my neighbor, I let him walk, I didn't have permission to shoot across the line.

I called my neighbor and told him about the buck, me letting him go and asked for permission to shoot across the property line. He said thanks "for asking", "sure you can shoot across the property line and you can hunt the rest of my 50 acres as well if you like". Doing the right thing is always the best choice and sometime pays off in the end.

From: Bassman Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 05-Jan-21




I killed the biggest buck of my life time hunting a property line on my son's land. I was hunting a white Oak grove, and grew up ,and was friends with the neighbor, and had permission. The buck came from his property, but I ended up shooting the buck on my son's property. It has been timbered since.I quit hunting,but my son still hunts that stand once in awhile, but with no more acorns for the deer to eat it is no longer productive. It is his property,and if he wants to yield a profit from timbering it is his call. Best to work it out with the neighbor to avoid confrontations.Big Balls won't stop a bullet.

From: fdp
Date: 05-Jan-21




This is similar to some stranger wanting to dictate how you arrange your furniture in your house.

From: Big Nine
Date: 05-Jan-21




Not a whole lot you can do as long as they are on their side of the line, facing their property. Of coarse they cannot shoot across the line or retrieve.

To you hunting the line is not the most ethical but to them it is perfectly legal.

In Illinois your a joining neighbor can keep you from hunting with firearm on your own land if your within 300 yards of their residents , 100 yard with bow. Seldom enforced but can be.

Best approach would be to address your concerns with them . If they are not reasonable then you know where you stand.

From: Ricky The Cabel Guy
Date: 05-Jan-21




its always fun reading about the unethical things people say they do when they are whining about someone else being unethical. someone said that if youre facing someones land, your on their land. that pretty much makes my small chunk worthless cuz i watch deer in my neighbors fields all the time and I'm nowhere near the property line.

From: Missouribreaks
Date: 05-Jan-21




I say nothing, but when the cameras catch a trespasser, I prosecute 100% of the time.

From: GF
Date: 05-Jan-21




“ In one case of a lease, the hunters lease 200 acres that butt up to my property-- 197.5 acres is tillable ground and 2.5 acres (that butts up to my property) has brush and small trees on it--guess where they place all of their stands.”

So now we’re going to fault them for having the merest scrap of common sense about where to set up a stand???

It just feels like far too many people have confused land ownership with owning the animals that pass through there, but with what people are spending on food plots and all that, I guess it’s to be expected.

It ain’t RIGHT, or true or legal, but selfish human nature is what it is....

From: Krag
Date: 05-Jan-21




I was once on the receiving end of an outrageous attempt to keep me away from a neighbors land - even though I no intention to disrespect his right to post it. My 10 acres was the SW corner of the farm to the east before being separated 30 yrs before I bought it in 2001. At that time I had access to that property as well as the property that bordered to the west but since I was working on the cabin every free moment for the first several years I didn't hunt then. Another resident in town owned across the road from me and all around the property to the east. His property line was at least 500ft behind mine and I had access to that 500ft. One day I noticed his posted signs on the edge of my property. So this guy knowingly posted someone else's property with his signs just to keep me off his. I mentioned it to the neihbor and the signs were taken down.

From: Sasquatch73
Date: 05-Jan-21




Comes down to relationships with other hunters/neighbors(which can be hard). Sometimes on small parcels it can be hard not to avoid the situation. This is an Archery site. Lots of room for us all with the short range and quietness of the type of hunting. Seems a lot of people voice concern about the numbers of hunters getting lower and lower. Then on their other hand they want to criticize hunters in their area for their style of hunting. Get to know your neighbors, you already have "the common ground". :)) On the other side, the dark side, the Hatfields and the McCoys was pretty entertaining.

From: Okaw
Date: 05-Jan-21




It’s bad manners and poor sportsmanship to hunt too close to the neighbors line without their permission. I have a woods that borders a grain field for 1/4 mile. Last year, a hunter leased that field and set a game camera on the fence line looking into my side. He also hung two tree stands on the only tree that grew entirely on his side of the fence. I had a bow stand 50 yards in on the same trail for the past 10 years. A friend got his phone number for me and I called and talked to him about the situation. He agreed with my concerns and took down his stands and camera. He was young and didn’t even think about the people already hunting the area. His lease consisted of 99% open field and a few trees at the fenceline of the neighbors. He said he was going to look for a better lease next year. I think most people will respect their neighbors property is asked to nicely.

From: Silverback
Date: 05-Jan-21




Unless you already have a stand on your property line right where he put his then why would it matter?

From: D31
Date: 05-Jan-21




My uncle owns a 160 acre farm. The neighbor on the back side of his property set up a box blind six inches from the fence with the only window facing my uncles pasture. Opening morning was foggy and when the neighbor shot uncle Joe jumped on his quad and went to investigate. When he got to his back pasture he discovered the box blind and seen the neighbor running away from the blind. The Gelding he rode for 15 years in the sheriffs posse was laying in the pasture shot through the heart fifty yards from the box blind. When the local police got there the barrel of the shotgun was still sticking out the only window in the blind overhanging the four strand barbed wire fence.

The neighbor was convicted of several charges including reckless discharge of a firearm and criminal trespass. The judge determined that a blind that was built with the only possible direction to shoot was onto the neighbors property constituted criminal trespass even though he never set foot on the property.

I spent a dozen years running trespassers out of my 40 acre woods before most got the message. The previous owner had allowed anyone who wanted to hunt the woods and it was a real chore getting people broke from the habit.

I posted it heavy, talked t all the neighbors and reposted every year but that didn't stop them. I caught one crew doing a deer drive and the leader of the pack told me "I OWN THIS LAND AND YOU BETTER LEAVE BEFORE I CALL THE LAW." I dialed 911 in front of him and told the dispatcher I had armed intruders on my property and needed assistance. That I was armed and was being threatened.They made it to there truck before the law arrived.

A couple years ago a house near my woods changed owners and the new owner was having a rummage sale.I stopped to look around and asked the man having the sale, " How is the hunting in that woods over there across that field." His response was exactly what I had been hoping to hear for years.

He said don't ever go in that woods for any reason. The guy who owns that is crazy and will shoot you on sight. He said I am serious that was the first thing the man who sold me this house said to me when I asked about hunting in the area.

I don't let anyone other than my son hunt my property. We do have agreements with all the neighboring properties that we can go on each others land to retrieve or track wounded game but we hunt what we own. If you choose to let people on your land that is up to you but once that gate is opened it is damn near impossible to stop it. Good Day

From: babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 05-Jan-21




If you cross the fence you are trespassing. If they didn't cross the fence they were legal. Like it or not.

From: Yeller Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 05-Jan-21




I usually throw a bunch of moth balls around that area. Deer hate the smell of them

From: Sparky
Date: 05-Jan-21




Property I hunt has fields on each side and about 10' in belongs to the owners of the fields. Both landowners have stands on the side strips. They only gun hunt. We just stay away from them. However I seriously doubt they never shoot behind them.

From: Kansasclipper
Date: 05-Jan-21




In western kansas the property line is generally the only place with trees. They mark the property boundary. I have no problem with it. Why does it matter?

From: GLF
Date: 05-Jan-21




As said before why would it matter unless you or a family member is doing the same. Gun season them being 50 yards or more from that fence isn't going to stop a bullet. In that case the line sitter is safer because he has to shoot away from your property. Yes a slob hunter might poach one on your place but you can't condemn all hunters because a few are slobs. You sound like the liberal people who want to take guns from law abiding people to stop criminals.

From: woodsman
Date: 05-Jan-21




Always best to work things out with your neighbors. At some point in time you will need each other when it comes time to track a deer that has crossed over the boundary line and there’s a good chance it will happen. Mutual respect is the only way to go.

From: Plugneck
Date: 05-Jan-21




I will NEVER ask someone else for permission to hunt my own land.

From: Dan In MI
Date: 05-Jan-21




So what if a camera is facing your side? He can’t see what’s over there, he can’t have any idea how the deer travel?

As far as a stand facing your side. Is he planning on shooting that way, or just using the tree as cover? What if he shoots it heading your way from his side? Was that YOUR deer or his?

There’s a bunch of assumptions, right or wrong, going on here.

From: Dartwick
Date: 05-Jan-21




I agree this is silly to worry about where his camera is facing.

That said there are possibilitiess where you you could tell stand is being placed so all the reasonable shooting from it will mean shooting into someone elses land.

From: Ricky The Cabel Guy
Date: 05-Jan-21




who cares what a hunter or is camera can see from a stand? as long as a deer is on his land when he shoots it, it's ok. if the deer goes on someone elses land after it's shot, they need permission to retrieve it. same applies if the deer was shot 5 feet from the line or 500 feet from the line. like I said before, I watch deer all morning in my neighbors fields. its not until they cross the line into my timber that they have a chance of getting shot by me. On the flipside, when they come out of my timber in the evenings to feed in his field, they are fair game for him. neither of us own em.

From: Bob
Date: 05-Jan-21




Wish them luck, and help track any deer that might run onto your property. You'll be better off for it.

From: Trad PA
Date: 05-Jan-21




If it’s their land I don’t understand the issue?

From: Trad PA
Date: 05-Jan-21




If it’s their land I don’t understand the issue?

From: Yellah Nocks
Date: 05-Jan-21




The history of the world on one four word sentence: two dogs, one bone.

From: Jon Stewart
Date: 05-Jan-21




I own my own property and have neighbors on two sides. One guy is a farmer no problem. The other guy is an absolute a-hole. He can't get around to hunt much anymore so he rides his ATV around his property border at 730am and 630pm. Just to see what's going on. It's his property so nothing is said. I just feel bad for my grandsons that are trying to hunt.

From: Krag
Date: 05-Jan-21




There was an episode of Lone Star Law where a neighbor was running a chainsaw, playing loud music and shooting to scare deer away when he saw hunters on the adjacent property so he could have the deer to himself. The wardens set up as hunters and recorded it for evidence then arrested him.

If you google "Lone Star Law harassment" there is an Animal Planet clip from the episode. Maybe someone better at it could attach the link.

From: JusPassin
Date: 05-Jan-21




Well, it would seem that if everyone behaved towards their neighbor the way they wanted them to behave in return this question wouldn't have any merit.

Naw, guess not.

From: cut it out
Date: 05-Jan-21




I didn’t read all the posts. But just be careful as many states have a law about harassing hunters. Just saying and I can sooo relate. I have a spot where during gun season a guy walks the line and sits on it every day of the season. It’s literally 12” of my path I use as it’s the only clear area to walk in with out brush busting. Almost drives ya mad but he never crosses onto our property so it’s not his problem I guess. Lol. Funny thing is he never kills a deer so I guess I’m winning :) lol.

From: cut it out
Date: 05-Jan-21




I didn’t read all the posts. But just be careful as many states have a law about harassing hunters. Just saying and I can sooo relate. I have a spot where during gun season a guy walks the line and sits on it every day of the season. It’s literally 12” of my path I use as it’s the only clear area to walk in with out brush busting. Almost drives ya mad but he never crosses onto our property so it’s not his problem I guess. Lol. Funny thing is he never kills a deer so I guess I’m winning :) lol.

From: babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 05-Jan-21




All always heard fences make good neighbors. That is unless you hunt lol

From: Rick Barbee Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 05-Jan-21




Texas has a law called "trespass by projectile". As in, you better not do it. Look it up.

I have no problem with someone hunting the fence/property lines of my property as long as they don't shoot on to my property, come on to my property without permission, or throw trash on my property.

As a bow hunter, I do not like hunting near property line fences. I'd much rather hunt on interior fence lines. That way I don't have to go find the owner of the adjacent property, and get permission to retrieve the game I just shot, and can see laying dead 50 yards away on their side.

Rick

From: JusPassin
Date: 05-Jan-21




Not much different than guys fishing. If a guy has found himself a decent spot and catches a few fish before long there will be a half a dozen boats circled around him. All boils down to manners, or the lack thereof.

From: Eric Krewson
Date: 05-Jan-21




There is a local management area close to town that never allowed deer hunting because of its close proximity to town. About 20 years ago they opened it to bow hunting in December, it was a deer Mecca.

I had cut some trails through the thick swamps to get to some white oak studded ridges that bordered private land, I knew exactly where the property lines were, they were marked with yellow paint and had a management area sign on every other tree.

I went in opening day and found posted signs across the swampy bottom where the private land guys put them, the signs were at least 150 yards inside the management area and attempt to "claim' be best land and make it appear to the unknowing that the management area stopped at the base of the ridge.

I knew these guys, we were good friends but wrong is wrong so I turned them in, the signs were gone the next day when I went to the same spot hunting.

From: Boker
Date: 05-Jan-21




I think everyone deals with this , access to larger private hunting properties are becoming near extinct so everyone’s hunting smaller spots down too 5 acres in a lot of cases.

Add in the price of land and hunting leases the vast majority don’t have a choice if they want to hunt.

I understand it’s a pain and frustrating at the same time but as long as they don’t shoot across the line there isn’t much anyone can do. All land owners should have the right to hunt every square inch of there land even up too a property line. Now that’s not to say it’s the right thing to do or even sportsmen like. Just the world we live in

I have multiple hunting properties where this has been a issue. I have seen it handle correctly and incorrectly

The best possible outcome is for property owners to work together especially if it’s small parcels.

Come to a agreement about stand placement and hunting times it may be it is beneficial to both parties to hunt closer to a boundary line due to the natural use of the land

Here’s how I handle it

if you have a valid reason for a stand placement close to the property line and from your stand on your land you see a deer within 50 yards on my land shoot it / feel free to come get it

Obviously I want the same courtesy shown to me.

There’s a lot more that has to be discussed and limits set then we can talk about here but my many point is I have never seen good come from two land owners that can’t get along.

Heck it’s almost like being married, your stuck together so your better off to make it as enjoyable as possible.

In the end it’s just a deer etc and not worth an argument and all that may follow which could even be life threatening.

Sadly I know not everyone is easy to work with or will try to be neighborly

In those cases it’s best to let the correct people handle it as much as possible.

One other point is some times it’s best for rifle hunters to shoot into there property vs across it toward your land.

I mean I rather have a guy on my property line shooting toward his 50 acre corn field vs him sitting in the middle of it shooting toward me with his 300 win Mag.

From: Bentstick81
Date: 05-Jan-21




I didn't read all the posts, but I would put up two to three trail cameras, where the hunter could see that they are pointed right at his spot. That way, the fence hunter would think twice about shooting on the other side of fence. You wouldn't be bothering him in any way, and he will know that possibly the camera will show which direction he shoots. Not saying the camera would be 100%, but guaranteed it would be on his mind.

From: hickory
Date: 05-Jan-21




I agree with bentstick81, a couple cameras oughta do it.

From: brush ape Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 05-Jan-21




I deal with this every year. If they keep their stand on their property, and face their property, fine. They generaly don't. The grass is always better on my alfalfa fields, or cover crop fields. I usually set a stool right across from their stand and face them. They've generally proved their mental capabilities by building their stand there. Just be ready to be threatened and have firearms pointed at you. You can't beat class. These situations will not get less or improve. There is no legal answer. More people, more problems.

From: Brian Phillips
Date: 05-Jan-21




"I mean I rather have a guy on my property line shooting toward his 50 acre corn field vs him sitting in the middle of it shooting toward me with his 300 win Mag."

Exactly

the rest of your response was great as well. People need to get over their property possessiveness. It's all much better if we work together. Up here, everything is posted up so tight you would think there were a hord of barbarians just over the knoll waiting to invade. I don't know what has gotten in to folks, there is so much land, and I'd bet 80% of it locally never sees a hunter, people don't even want to consider it. I think it must be the insurance companies have everyone scared.... or maybe the tv? The state encourages hunting because there are probably more deer than people.

From: babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 05-Jan-21




Trail cameras. Lol. Put them up Here in WV and they will disappear. While you guys are fighting over your fence lines the good ole boys are killing deer right from under you

From: Stumpkiller
Date: 05-Jan-21




I don't "handle" them at all. My next door neighbor and I have identical 20 acre property shapes: 335 ft wide and 2,480 ft deep. The shape of a foot-long ruler +/-. I don't post and he doesn't post except the frontage. We sit on our own property and stay a bow- shot inside the "lines". Same for rifle or bow. Both our houses are near the road and the property goes down a hill and back up to the ridge of the next.

No crime in sharing. It's good to know and be friendly with your neighbors. I've often said "our neighborhood watch group is through cross-hairs".

Happily the "neighbor" to the back owns 360 acres and lives out of state. I "keep an eye" on his access road to his cabin year-round and he lets me bowhunt or small game hunt - except the first two weeks of deer season. GREAT arrangement.

From: kstout
Date: 06-Jan-21




I have an agreement with my neighbors. If we shoot a deer, and it crosses property lines, we follow it. I have stands within 20 yards of the line, and so do they. The neighbor to the West tells me if I want to look for dropped antlers, or mushrooms in the spring to go ahead.

From: Zildjian51
Date: 06-Jan-21




Yep...been there. My father-in-law had an 80 acre farm I used to hunt on. The last year I hunted with a gun, no one in our family got one but 7 bucks were taken off his land by the neighbor and his hunting friends from out of town. The kicker is the neighbor posts his land.

From: Surveyor61
Date: 06-Jan-21




If you own 300 acres next to a guy who owns 10 you better make every attempt to get along, because when you shoot that buck of a lifetime it will cross into the 10 acres. (Murphy's Law)

You both need each others cooperation. You will enjoy your hunting time much more.

From: msinc
Date: 06-Jan-21




Well I don't do it and I don't understand people hunting property lines. There is a high probability that if you do hit a deer he will trail onto private property and you will loose him. That idea alone is enough to kill it for me. I don't post any of my land in the hope that if I do have a deer go onto land I don't own the owner will allow me to retrieve it. I always ask first and so far have always been told to go ahead. I own land in two states, and two counties in Virginia. Rockbridge county is a "fence out" county, which means if you don't want someones livestock on your land YOU have to fence them out!!! Imagine my surprise after buying land, building a cabin, paying land taxes and then driving 4 hours one way to go hunting in the middle of a herd of someone else's cattle!!!!

From: Brassbandit
Date: 06-Jan-21




Wait until the cattle are there then fence them in. Haha, im kidding of course. That sounds crazy, where I live everyone is responsible for any damages caused by their livestock, including vehicle collisions and property damage.

There's also no such thing as losing an animal because it crossed onto private land after the shot. You have try to contact the landowner. If you cant or they are unwilling to let you into the land, you then call fish and wildlife and they will escort you into the land to retrieve your game.

From: GUTPILEPA
Date: 06-Jan-21




Brass bandit not here in PA the game commission will not go on private property unless there was a law broken I know cause it happen to me I shot a nice 7pt on game land it went in private property got ahold of a game warden and he told me private property is private property even he can’t go in

From: Okaw
Date: 06-Jan-21




I suspect that many who think it ok to hunt right on the property lines, have not had to scrimp and save for years to afford a few acres of their own hunting land.

The area I hunt consists of over 100 acres of small parcels owner by 4 hunters. We all bow hunt with traditional equipment and sometimes gun hunt if needed for the meat. We mostly hunt on our own ground, but the agreement is to treat the entire area as our own and help each other with stands and recovery, etc.

We do get others around us that are not sportsmen or even neighborly, and have to keep watch over each others property when possible. We want to respect their rights and have them respect ours too.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 06-Jan-21




It's already been stated here. You can sure tell who owns a nice chunk of property, and who owns a tiny piece. The tinys think they can hunt the bigger chunks or cry when the real landowners (taxpayers) catch them cheating. Don't get caught. Make more money and buy yourself an appropriate amount of land. Or exercise your rights as a public land owner. And hunt THERE.

From: fdp
Date: 06-Jan-21




This is a very interesting thread that could be used as a social experiment piece I think.

From: GLF
Date: 06-Jan-21




Got a question? Would you guys who think they have rights over someone elses propery rather your neighbor hunt a hundred yards from the fence and possibly be shooting a gun towards your propery where an accident could happen or sit the fence where to be legal he has to shoot away from your property avoiding accidents? Remember everyone is always shooting towards someone property.

From: GLF
Date: 06-Jan-21




So how far is it "ok" to hunt on your own land from its borders? 100 yards? Take a hundred yards away from the landowner all the ways around his property and you've taken a huge chunk of land that you e's paying taxes on. And remember this thread is about being butthurt over a person hunting their own property. Not about poaching off your land. Being a land owner doesn't give your rights on a neighbors land. Plus ,again, the only way he would effect you is if you're doing the same. Y'all are bitching about what someone "might" do if he were a poacher. You're an adult now and living in the real world so you're not going to get your own way by starting stuff with your neighbors. Fence rows are good hunting and hunting them is not illegal, rude, or unethical.

From: tradmt
Date: 06-Jan-21




GLF, you can’t just go around interjecting common sense into these threads, you make them all look like idiots. :)

fdp, you nailed that one! Lol

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 06-Jan-21




Lol...

From: TrapperKayak
Date: 06-Jan-21




Social Experiment statement #1: 'Gut zhoot 'em at the border'.. (Joking of course...:) ) Just don't harass anyone and find a suitable compromise through amicable discussion if possible. If they don't shoot anything on your land, give them the option that you could hunt the same property line and any chosen spot just like they are.

From: TrapperKayak
Date: 06-Jan-21




Social Experiment statement #1: 'Gut zhoot 'em at the border'.. (Joking of course...:) ) Just don't harass anyone and find a suitable compromise through amicable discussion if possible. If they don't shoot anything on your land, give them the option that you could hunt the same property line and any chosen spot just like they are.

From: TrapperKayak
Date: 06-Jan-21




sorry about 2x post

From: Ricky The Cabel Guy
Date: 06-Jan-21




if youre really concerned about safety would you rather have the hunter on the 40 next door sitting in the middle shooting out or sitting on the edge shooting in?

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 06-Jan-21




Oh boy...

From: Butch
Date: 06-Jan-21




Safety goes both ways-- whether a shooting accident is caused by my grandkids or they are shot by someone on the adjacent property, a grave situation would have occurred--"shooting in" or "shooting out" is really not the concern--it is the safety for all people who enjoy hunting. The responsibility, liability and despair would be tremendous for everyone involved, but for the landowner involved, a shooting accident could/would be devastating in many additional ways.

I do appreciate all of the comments that have been entered on this thread. It is apparent that we do not all agree on how to resolve issues with property line hunters-- which is certainly the American way--each to his own opinion!

However, there are several things that we do have in common -- love of the outdoors; hunting with trad. equipment and passionate to share our beliefs. For this we should all be grateful.

Keep the faith.

From: Brassbandit
Date: 06-Jan-21




You should call the cops and report them for using their own property, that will show them.

From: JimG
Date: 07-Jan-21




I've got to say this....I've hunted both public and private land during gun and bow seasons for a variety of game in the following states; Ohio, Penn, IL, IND, SC, and VT and the country of Canada since 1990. What is with this fear of being shot????? I'm sitting here trying to remember even 1 incident that either I witnessed or was somehow involved in, that involved dangerous or unsafe hunting conditions due to unsafe or dangerous firearm or archery weapon handling. And I cannot come up with 1 time where this has happened in 30 years of hunting. I hunt 2-4 days a week from Aug 1 through the middle of Feb. That's somewhere between 50 to 100 days afield a year. Multiply that by 30 years and yet I've never had anything like what some of you are suggesting occur. You might not like someone 'fence sitting' but that does not mean they will shoot you. Good grief.

From: 9/10 Broke Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Jan-21




I was in a club years ago that was 7,000 acres of leased timber company land. We had a main camp house that was shared by everyone and evenings were spent there hanging out telling stories. One evening a young boy about 14 or 15 told a member he had seen him and watched him as he slipped through a cutover. The member asked how he knew it was him cause the shooting house the boy was in was over 300 yards away. The boy replied that he watched him through his scope. This is just one of many ways that people can get shot. I felt sorry for the boy cause the fight that ensued between the member and the boys dad lead to the boys dad’s membership being revoked but it shouldn’t have happened. The dad should have been with his son as he was obviously not ready to be out hunting on his own.

From: Krag
Date: 07-Jan-21




Want to hear what a bullet sounds like wizzing by your head? Check this out at the 5:45 mark. This hunter in Manitoba claims the shooter was a trespasser.

From: fdp
Date: 07-Jan-21




Jim, from the what I get reading these posts it isn't really that anyone is afraid of getting shot. Except for in the case of the OP.

It has more to do with people being offended when someone else gets too close to their fence, may look across their fence, or may shoot an animal too close to or on the wrong side of their fence.

From: Krag
Date: 07-Jan-21




Here is the link

https://youtu.be/uHRw7SfXAZ0

From: Dartwick
Date: 07-Jan-21




"Jim, from the what I get reading these posts it isn't really that anyone is afraid of getting shot. Except for in the case of the OP. It has more to do with people being offended when someone else gets too close to their fence, may look across their fence, or may shoot an animal too close to or on the wrong side of their fence."

Shooting an animal on the wrong side of the fences(without permission) is totally different than everything else you mentioned.

I think essentially everyone agrees thats wrong.

From: fdp
Date: 07-Jan-21




Not saying it's not wrong. Just saying that based on many of the comments in this thread (again other than the OP's) that the possibility off that happening is more worrisome than any potential real or imagined safety concern.

Read the responses.

From: South Farm
Date: 07-Jan-21




One sure way of ridding yourself of fence sitters is to put Petula Clark's "Downtown" on a perpetual loop and play it day and night. They'll move..

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Jan-21




As the clueless continue to show their ignorance. It's not about worrying whether someone is hunting your property. It's a safety thing. Perhaps if you had your oen property you'd understand. Please carry on with the ignorance. Everyone enjoys a good laugh at your expense. And it's free!!!

From: Ricky The Cabel Guy
Date: 07-Jan-21




this isn't about safety, it's about someone feeling that someone else might shoot their buck. yes, I own my own land.

From: JimG
Date: 07-Jan-21




Swampwalker

Is 400 acres with huntable property surrounding 3 sides enough to understand?

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Jan-21




Hi Jim, sure but I'm not sure what you don't understand? You wear blaze orange (if required)? Why? Because it's the law? Only reason? Or do wear to protect yourself from being misidentified? Point being, if you had guys on three sides, on your property lines facing into your property, wouldn't that cause you any consternation? Or is your property all open tundra?

From: Stan
Date: 07-Jan-21




Luck of the draw on if you get a respectable neighbor or not.. And that goes both ways.. Way back when, there were unspoken hunting respect rules that most hunters would follow, Things have changed.. Now days folks have no problem with Sitting 10 yards away from you, when they come stumbling in late for a hunt, or maybe help themselves to your blind if you were foolish enough to show any trace of it being there .(state land) If it's legal, it's legal... As far as being shot or fear of it.. Here in Michigan, I have had rapid fire 22cal. bullets zip just over my head, high power centerfire bullets zip just feet next to me, 00 buck shot hit the tree above me, hit by birdshot, and rained on by birdshot.. The concern is real...lol

From: Rick Barbee Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Jan-21




Before the start of this past season, I did some clearing on my property, and installed a feed/water station dead center of it.

I also cleared a single path from the center to the roads/property lines on all four sides of the property.

One of my neighbors must have not liked what I did, because not long after I cleared the path they placed a rifle stand, and feeder right on the fence at the one path I had cleared to that side.

To their credit, they did keep it all looking to their interior though, and it didn't effect my deer traffic for very long, because I just went 100 yards either side of it, and cleared two more paths.

The animals that normally crossed directly through their property now go around to (or near) the corners, and come on over to see me anyway. :-)

Rick

From: JimG
Date: 07-Jan-21




It is woods and cropland. And yes there are stands on the property lines that belong to us AND stands belong to them. As a matter of fact we shoot deer out of one of THEIR crop fields that borders our property line. They don't care. Nor do we care if they shoot a deer that is standing on our side in the mature hardwoods from their side of the property line. We don't walk on their property and they don't walk on ours OTHER than to recover deer. It's never been a problem in way shape or form. Never even really been any discussion about it. Been roughly 15 years that way. We expect THEM to act like sensible adults about shooting and that's what's expected of US.

We don't own the deer. They don't own the deer. The govt of IL owns the deer (technically the people do, but we all know how that works right?). If they shoot a big buck that we have been seeing......well that's just how the cookie crumbles. The 'deer wars' in my opinion is dumb and we would all be better served if we all acted like we had some sense and learned to get along.

I've seen people get screaming mad over some kid (teenager) shooting a trophy buck (legally) on his dads land. The irate individual thought that buck was 'HIS'. That is just silly.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Jan-21




Doesn't address my point back to you. You called me out,so to speak. That's okay though. Have a good off season. Sure can tell when season is done. :^)

From: Dartwick
Date: 07-Jan-21




The safety thing is mostly a red herring here I agree.

In my state during rifle season there are very few place that are totally safe. Very few people get shot but it occasionally happens.

From: JimG
Date: 07-Jan-21




Actually I did address your point. No it does not bother me as I expect others to act sensible. So if 3 hunters wearing orange were 'fence sitting' and facing towards our property, no I don't care. I expect hunters to positively identify the target and practice basic marksmenship skills. If this is done then there are no issues.

From: GUTPILEPA
Date: 07-Jan-21




Way to go JimG totally agree

From: Boker
Date: 07-Jan-21




JimG

Great post!

Deer hunters are their own worst enemy.

I know because I been both types and on both sides of the debate.

obviously hunters that present a danger to those on our personal property or are attempting to hunt private property illegally have to be confronted.

But just because they are hunting near a boundary line isn’t proof of either.

Deer travel across property lines all the time. not sure what would be the difference in shooting it 5 yards from it or 100 yards from it as long as it’s on your property.

It’s been said that If you dont have enough property to hunt 100 yards from the line then don’t hunt or buy a big piece of land.

It could also be said if you don’t want someone to shoot a deer Leaving your property then put up a high fence.

Funny story

I know of such a case, a gentleman was hunting a 15 acre parcel owned by family. It bordered a thousand acre farm.

Obviously he wasn’t wealthy and the owner of the farm was.

They was so afraid he’d shoot “their” deer they installed a 300 yard high fence on the property line. I image it cost them a small fortune to do so.

They was so proud of themselves for the first year because it did as they had intended however the second, third and fourth year the guy on the 15 acre parcel killed a couple nice bucks each of those years. In his own words it was his best years to date.

Turns out their Deer blocker became a natural funnel right to his stand while at the same time kept the deer from running back onto their property so he didn’t have to be denied access to retrieve his deer anymore.

This guy was a friend of mine, hard worker and a honest man. He told me he’d never set facing their property or did he ever shoot toward it. I actually saw his stand placement and it was obvious he was telling the truth. The stand wasn’t really that close to the line anyway. If I remember correctly He said the 5th year they removed the fence.

We had a good laugh.

From: babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 07-Jan-21




I’m lucky my neighbors are too lazy to hunt. They may ride a UTF around once in a while but they don’t get off of it. The deer and I just watch em pass. If I shoot a deer I call them and tell them and then go get it.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Jan-21




Way to go Jim. Thank you for the clarification. :^)

From: JimG
Date: 07-Jan-21




And since this is the Internet, and things tend to get confused. Let me clarify something. We don't walk or trespass on their property. They don't walk or trespass on ours. Unless to retrieve a deer. Any and all weapons are left at the property line when retrieving deer. No field dressing until deer is over the prop line. But we and them will shoot deer on the other side of the prop line. We are a shotgun/muzzleloader/bow state so no .270win 300 yard shots. We are talking 50 yards or so or less. And it's NEVER been a problem EVER.

An real example of how not everything is black and white with where it's ethical/moral to place a stand is this-

2 years ago on opening morning for bow season I shot a small buck. The stand was facing north. Their property is to the west roughly 200 yards. The buck was facing north. The deer presented a broadside shot. Apon being hit the buck turned West and ran hard. Never stopped running until out of sight. It ended up 50ish yards inside their property line dead as a doornail. Shot as a pass through. Hit both lungs a little higher than midway up. Placing a stand 100 yards from the property line like some here suggest would not have done any good in this case. Deer when hit don't always follow the rules of double lung hits.

From: babysaph Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 07-Jan-21




I agree JimG. I’m going to go get my dead deer. I won’t shoot one across the fence but I’m going to get mine if it goes across the fence. And I know they will do the same. Why let a deer lay?

From: TrapperKayak
Date: 07-Jan-21




Jim G, I bet you are the exception rather than the rule. I have hunted one heckuva lot during the 50 plus years I've done it, and I can count at least 6 times that I've either been actually shot AT, or been in the direct line of fire of wreckless/careless riflemen or shotgunners (and one woman) during that time. I have just been flat out lucky that I was missed. And there have been a few other times when I caught guys sighting at me through their rifle scopes, which should make ANYONE uneasy. And one time when the guy I was hunting with potentially almost cut me in two point blank when he sat down next to me with his .06 muzzle poking my rib cage, with the SAFETY OFF, BULLET CHAMBERED, AND NEWLY ADJUSTED (READ HAIR) TRIGGER THAT DISCHARGED WHEN HE JAMBED THE BOLT SHUT THE NEXT TIME I HUNTED WITH HIM. My biggest mistake (and fortune ironically) was that there actually WAS a next time. Hunting acccidents including those from on adjacent properties are not as uncommon as you would have us believe. Maybe with a bow they are.....

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 08-Jan-21




Stuff happens, unfortunately. You can't assume everyone is going to act the way they ought to. JimG, everybody hopes for neighbors like you. If I don't know em, I don't trust em. We are constantly running them off our property.

From: olddogrib
Date: 08-Jan-21




Karen lives! How dare other landowners not honor the 100 yd. "buffer zone" that begins on their side of the fence!

From: Beauxhunter
Date: 08-Jan-21




Thanks for the laughswamp walker,End it did not cost me a dime LOL

From: 9/10 Broke Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 08-Jan-21




Grass is always greener on the other side.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 08-Jan-21




Don't mind being laughed at beauxhunter. Been laughing at me for four years now. Keep on keeping on.

From: Butch
Date: 08-Jan-21




Quite surprised that safety isn't an issue at all for some. In the state of Indiana anyone born after Dec. 31, 1986 must successfully complete a DNR hunter safety course in order to purchase a hunting license. Evidently this doesn't have anything to do with safety-- just a ploy to keep the younger folks into the classrooms and off of the streets!

From: Sparky
Date: 09-Jan-21




The variable is who are the neighbors. That being said it's ignorant to brush anyone's concerns with a broad brush. If you've lived your entire life without a single crappy neighbor count yourself lucky.

From: VTer Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 09-Jan-21




I usually just wave.

From: tradmt
Date: 09-Jan-21




Explain the safety issue please. I think most here are actually very much aware and are concerned about safety, they just can’t find the unsafe part about your mutual fence line.

From: GLF
Date: 09-Jan-21




Sorry sparky but the crappy neighbors are "NOT" the ones hunting their own property and minding their own business. A person is innocent until proven guilty, yes even in hunting. You can't control a guys land or how he uses it according to what you think MIGHT happen.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 09-Jan-21




The way i have handled it twice in the last three years is to file trespassing charges when the deer they shoot crosses the fence and they in turn cross the fence to get the deer without permission. It cost them about $2500 in fines and court cost. ( plus whatever they paid their lawyer) Setting up on your neighbors fence line is rude and shows no respect for your neighbor so you should not expect any slack in return.

From: Sparky
Date: 09-Jan-21




GLF in my earlier post i state how we stay away from the line sitters where i hunt. My point is i'm certain there are plenty of instances where the neighbors are misbehaving. The idea to just go make friends, etc well that does not always work. Sometimes if you value your health it's not even an option.

I've never had any direct problems myself. I have a large parcel so it's easy to avoid them. My brother sure has though. It started like this. My bro was out in the woods doing some work near the line. New owner walks by with his boy. Brother waves, says Hi I'm Danny. The guy gives him the stink eye as he walks by. 15 yards away in the middle of the woods. It only escalated on the neighbors part. Just this season the warden had to go warn the neighbor to STOP calling him Danny wasn't breaking the law. Among other things. Guy from the city bought 20 acres and i guess he thought he'd be the only one around for miles. Nevermind the folks been living there 3-4 decades.

The responses, not just to the op but neighbors in general, that we are all good ol boys we can just get along does not hardly work everywhere on the planet. imo

From: tradmt
Date: 12-Jan-21




One could shoot a deer through both lungs, 150 yards from the boundary, and have the deer cross property lines.

People will always get what’s coming to them, maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but it’s coming. If an adjacent property won’t allow me a retrieval then I guess I just get back to hunting and, if I’m the one being asked about retrieving, I will help you track and pack. Big racks just aren’t worth being caught up in greedy sin, and that goes both ways, the fence hunter shouldn’t shoot across the line and the opposite owner should allow retrieval of a legally taken animal.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 12-Jan-21




If someone shot a deer 100+ yards from my fence and asked for permission to retrieve it, it would be fine. However someone with a stand 10 feet from the fence who crosses will get charged with trespassing. Someone said they are not breaking the law hunting next to the fence, true. I am also not breaking the law by not letting them trespass.

From: Outdoors94
Date: 12-Jan-21




There's lots of ways to handle this situation. I personally own property an work my tail off to make it better deer habitat. I've got several neighbor's try to capitalize on my hard work. Nothing I can do about that. My issue is I've been scouting stumps shooting. In the process I've found ten dead deer never retrieved by neighbors. During our Michigan gun season. If I would of been contacted I would of helped them look. Much better then them being coyote an crow bait. Very frustrating. God bless

From: RymanCat
Date: 12-Jan-21




I made it simple for you. First and foremost is to get along!!!!!!

It will go so much further when you need to recover your own animal on their stand.

I've had other clubs members sitting my stand looking our way to before.

Now when you can't agree I could tell you all sorts of ways to play war. To fix a JO you have to be a JO.

Its best to not have to get to that part though and be friendly.

When big deer are around though you have to learn to out smart them and that can be done with decoy stands. They think you are somewhere when you are somewhere else and that can work on your own club members who don't want to cooperate and share intel on certain animals.

Let the best killer win. You can be loved and not be a killer or be hated and envied because you are a killer.

From: Wispershot
Date: 12-Jan-21




All good till they cross the line Just set one up right behind there’s on your side.

From: GLF
Date: 12-Jan-21




In some states if your a control freak who refuse access to legally shot game your the law breaker/bad guy. Not the landowner who won't let you control his property. Just like a couple states it illegal to carry out the antlers before the meat. Letting a legally shot deer rot or stealing it should have a mandatory jail term because that oerson who look egally shot it will now shoot 2 instead of one.

From: Rick Barbee Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 12-Jan-21




I've adopted a new policy on how to proceed under such circumstances.

I first ask if they are a democrat, then select my choice of action from there.

:P <3

Rick

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 12-Jan-21




In Texas, private property rights are a big deal and well honored in the courts. There is no obligation to allow someone to trespass. Again, someone hunting on your fence is showing you no respect and to trespass to retrieve a deer on top of that, not forgivable.

From: SteveD Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 12-Jan-21




The unifying love of the hunting community.

This topic validates for the most part that we have to many hunters for the amount of land, despite what the so called studies and certain groups preach.

From: GLF
Date: 12-Jan-21




We've got enough land. We just have too many younger folks who think they own the deer so are butt hurt if someone hunts close to their land. Maybe banning all hunting on propertys less than 100 acres would fix the problem. People have been hunting fencerows as long as theres been fencerows. Its never been a problem till the generations born after about 1980 grew up. So its not the oroblem. Newer attitudes are the problem.

From: JimG
Date: 13-Jan-21




GLF said-

We've got enough land. We just have too many younger folks who think they own the deer so are butt hurt if someone hunts close to their land. Maybe banning all hunting on propertys less than 100 acres would fix the problem. People have been hunting fencerows as long as theres been fencerows. Its never been a problem till the generations born after about 1980 grew up. So its not the oroblem. Newer attitudes are the problem.

That pretty much sums it up nicely.

From: JHPope
Date: 13-Jan-21




Rick Barbee, You and I think alike.

From: selstickbow
Date: 13-Jan-21




I've been lucky & largely hunted my own place. No dealings with fenceline hunters, for the most part. I've been able to turn most away that wanted to hunt my place. If someone was hunting the fenceline ON THEIR SIDE, I went away, as it's not my place to dictate how they deal with things on their side of the fence. I did have one older gent, a big city knucklehead, moved in 1/2 mile away, we had verbal problems & intercourse as he kept thinking he was able to automatically hunt my place and all other places in the neighborhood. We did have some near conflicts with him & his sons, SEVERAL times, but I was able to convince them otherwise. Problem went away.

From: GLF
Date: 13-Jan-21




Deer hunting took away the "everyone hunting everyones property" once there were enough deer for everyone to hunt. Before that very very few cared if you hunted as long as you stayed away from their home and the few that did posted their property. But deer aren't as plentiful as rabbits n squirrels.

From: JimG
Date: 13-Jan-21




GLF said-

Deer hunting took away the "everyone hunting everyones property" once there were enough deer for everyone to hunt. Before that very very few cared if you hunted as long as you stayed away from their home and the few that did posted their property. But deer aren't as plentiful as rabbits n squirrels.

Once again GLF speaks the truth.

From: tradmt
Date: 13-Jan-21




Rick Barbee and GLF, I agree sirs.

Trespassing keeps coming up here, this isn’t trespassing to hunt your side of the fence, regardless of how close the fence is. Permission always has to be given before crossing the fence and if you won’t give permission because someone sat the fence line and shot the buck you wanted than you are the problem. You’re greed will cost you, I can promise you that.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 13-Jan-21




Hopefully, no one here thinks that because you hunt on your neighbors property line that you have trespass rights to look for a deer.

From: Rick Barbee Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 13-Jan-21




Also in Texas:

If you have need to go on neighboring property to retrieve an animal shot on your property, but the neighbor will not give you permission, all you have to do is call the game warden, and they will escort you on & off the property to retrieve the animal.

You better darn well be able to prove you shot it on your property though.

Rick

From: r.grider
Date: 13-Jan-21




That dont fly in ky. A landowner is not required by law to grant you access to their property for game retrieval, which is why you need to stay on good terms with your neighbors. If they hunt the boundery, so can you. Its best to be friends than enemies.

From: PECO
Date: 13-Jan-21




The neighbor set up a stand on the line facing my father in laws property. My father in law filled the manure spreader and emptied it at the base of the tree. The tree was on the property line. Great story.

From: PECO
Date: 13-Jan-21




The neighbor set up a stand on the line facing my father in laws property. My father in law filled the manure spreader and emptied it at the base of the tree. The tree was on the property line. Great story.

From: lv2bohunt
Date: 13-Jan-21




How satisfying is it to find a rotting buck on your side of the fence knowing that at least your neighbor didn’t trespass and get his hands on it?

From: r.grider
Date: 13-Jan-21




That’s bad. Hard to befriends with someone like that. I’d probably have to build a high fence between us. Or take that stand down.

From: tradmt
Date: 13-Jan-21




I don’t think it’s required in Montana either, and it shouldn’t be, property owners should not be required by law to allow trespass. If you want my dead deer left on your property than that’s on you, I shot it on my property but again, that’s on you and I hope it’s the biggest buck that’s ever been, that way every time you look at those antlers you will be reminded of how filthy greedy you are.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 13-Jan-21




Rick Barbee. Your post about a Game Warden being able to bring someone on private property to look for a deer in Texas is not true! After your post I contacted the local Warden and he said no! If you still believe your post is true, contact a Game Warden but no one in Texas should be thinking they have , under any circumstance, a “right” to cross a fence.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 13-Jan-21




Rick Barbee. Your post about a Game Warden being able to bring someone on private property to look for a deer in Texas is not true! After your post I contacted the local Warden and he said no! If you still believe your post is true, contact a Game Warden but no one in Texas should be thinking they have , under any circumstance, a “right” to cross a fence.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 13-Jan-21




Sorry for double post

From: 4406v
Date: 13-Jan-21




Two lessons here:

IF YOU DON'T OWN IT , YOU DON'T CONTROL IT

SOME PEOPLE ARE ABSOLUTE JERKS OVER HUNTING

From: NY Yankee
Date: 13-Jan-21




Love the wood cutting and squirrel hunting idea!

From: Josh/PA
Date: 13-Jan-21




Burning his tree to the ground is a good start.

From: BigOzzie
Date: 13-Jan-21




I have had issues with this in the past, but with a couple of unique circumstances. first 90% of my 500 acres of hunting land is surrounded by public land so everyone is my neighbor. and Not everyone is a good neighbor.

secondly the 3 other neighbors I do have in brief are 1. 2 use an access road that travels through my property, so poaching deer on my property on their way home.

2. the third neighbor is a drama queen and anything that is done anywhere near them is an event.

first I just look the other way with the two neighbors that drive through my property and hope they do not get a shot at the "big one". they have and they will but life is long and I need to get along with them. they are wood ticks they are mostly taking does to fill their freezer, only take the big buck if it makes a mistake. They are not hunting the big guy.

second drama queen only wants to kill for antlers and we have had issues. In an effort to make things more difficult for them to cross paths with the big buck I tried to change deer travel patterns, and I was mostly successful. I tied strands of fence wire together to make it easier for deer to cross "my" fence. secondly I turned a 3 strand fence into a 5 strand fence close to their hunting blind, so that deer would go elsewhere to cross.

It has worked, during paternable travel time, nothing works during the rut.

oz

From: BigOzzie
Date: 13-Jan-21




sorry for the formatting, grammer, and spelling, that post was hard to read.

oz

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 13-Jan-21




Hey Big, better than most. Thx!

From: Rick Barbee Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 13-Jan-21




Thumper-tx, you are correct. I didn't call the game warden to check it out, I looked up the laws themselves.

Why did I not call the game warden (you might ask)?

Because it was a game warden who told me to contact them to gain access to an animal if permission was not achieved otherwise.

That was a long time ago, so it very well may have been the law at that time. Who knows. I don't really care.

As long as you aren't a democrat, I'll let you retrieve your animal from my property. :-) :P

Rick

From: GLF
Date: 13-Jan-21




4406v x2. But I woulda use stronger language.

From: Beauxhunter
Date: 13-Jan-21




Josh if you burn down his tree what is to prevent him from burning down your whole stand of woods? that is a pretty boneheaded move there. I would just hunt my side of the fence and worry about what’s going on on my property and not what is going on the other side. You wouldn’t want to encourage one of those terrible hunting accident you all seem to be worried about. Pretty easy for somebody with a gun in the woods to just oops you dead if you mess with the wrong guy .I don’t think I would provoke a situation that could lead to me getting shot

From: Andy Man
Date: 13-Jan-21




walk up to them and start a very loud conversation like you don't have good sense " Hi! I'm kinda deaf so you gotta talk loud Yabba dabba Yabba dabba said the Monkey to the chimp

don't have that problem here- property lines are respected and no big deal to cross over to retrieve a deer (but farms are Big) and nit picking not done- kinda need each other

From: GLF
Date: 13-Jan-21




Andyman thats how most of ohio is. Its usually the small landowners that are the problem. And even most of them are cool about retrieving a deer.

From: Andy Man
Date: 13-Jan-21




Yea only makes common sense to me-

and so what if they or you shoot one on the prperty line-its not like you committed adultery

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 13-Jan-21




Brother...

From: deerhunt51
Date: 14-Jan-21




I always wear oven mitts when removing from the oven.

From: rxbob
Date: 14-Jan-21




Used to bow/gun hunt public game areas in Michigan.On opening day of gun season abutting landowners would sit on edge of game areas knowing hunters would push deer out onto their property.

From: Ricky The Cabel Guy
Date: 14-Jan-21




the solution is pretty simple. why don't the people who have a problem with their neighbor hunting the fence line just make an imaginary line of their own 100 yards or so into their property from the actual property lines and just act like that is the property line. after all, that's what theyre asking their neighbor to do.

From: soap creek
Date: 14-Jan-21




I moved here on my 20 acre property in 84. Back then I could walk in any direction from home about as far as I wanted to hunt and no one cared. Not any more. Now we have leasing and, nonresident land owners who bought the land just to hunt. They all post no trespassing signs and have a whole different attitude about what being a good neighbor is all about. Very sad indeed. Greed, lack of respect, no love for your fellow man its all about me, seems to be the new norm. I see it to ever going back to how it use to be. Its the sign of our times I guess. Treat people the way you want to be treated. Always take the high road. Life is short. What's a trophy deer worth in the whole scheme of life anyway?

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Jan-21




Should have bought more property. Lots of public land too. :^)

From: deerhunt51
Date: 14-Jan-21




The man that pays the taxes makes the rules. As long as within the law of course.

From: GLF
Date: 14-Jan-21




Look out dead cow, here we come.

From: Josh/PA
Date: 14-Jan-21




@Beauxhunter I was being sarcastic. :)

From: Will tell
Date: 14-Jan-21




I hunt in a urban area, I'm always on someones property line.: )

From: SteveBNY
Date: 14-Jan-21




Retrieval rights and protocol with neighboring landowners should be worked out prior to start of every season. Just part of prepping for the hunt - just like scouting, shooting your bow, sharpening broadheads. That way when you make the decision to drop the string, you know many/most of the outcomes and you decide to shoot/no shoot. Then set your stand sites accordingly. Of course bordering public land will have its own issues.

From: Brassbandit
Date: 14-Jan-21




@Rick Barbee you sound like a good person and christian considering you judge people based on their voting choices.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




Rick is top notch. How you vote can tell a lot about you. Kinfa obvious throughout this thread. Enjoy, comrade.

From: Pappy 1952
Date: 15-Jan-21




I just stay on my side and expect them to stay on theirs , if they shoot something on their side and it runs to my side I am more than happy to let them, even help them look, I expect the same, I try to keep a good relationship with the land owners that joins my farm.In Tennessee you can't go on another persons land no matter what without permission, game warder or not, so best to stay in good relationship with people that join you.Had a few problems over the years but mostly good results from this approach, Most people I have found if you are good to them they will be good to you with a few exceptions. Pappy

From: Beauxhunter
Date: 15-Jan-21




Sorry Josh I thought you were being straight with us.

From: tradmt
Date: 15-Jan-21




What Pappy said is a sound policy. I think what we have here is people claiming ownership of animals, big bucks no doubt. You sit a fence line stand and shoot that big boy on your side and it ends up on mine, I want in on helping and I will congratulate you on your accomplishment, not give you BS lecture on how ‘unsafe’ it was for you to shoot in the opposite direction of my land. Give me a break.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




And your response is spot on tradmt. Pappy, have you for a neighbor anytime. Some aren't getting it. When you hunt someone's property line, it tells a lot about your character. And defending it, even more. I think responses like Beaux boy are there just to aggravate. Best to avoid them and hope they are not your neighbor.

From: Rick Barbee Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




[[[ "@Rick Barbee you sound like a good person and christian considering you judge people based on their voting choices." ]]]

Triggered ?

Where did I say I judged the person?

My comment only says, that I am judging the circumstance to make a decision, AND since you missed it - I did not say what that decision would be.

Go fish. :-) :P

Rick

From: 9/10 Broke Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21

9/10 Broke's embedded Photo



They’re hittin crankbaits around here right now.

From: grizz
Date: 15-Jan-21




Property line hunters are on their property, end of discussion, mind your own business. And yes I own property.

So, someone tell me, why is it that some Canadians can’t pass up the chance to make smart-ass remarks on American politics? Just like this thread; you stay on your side of the line, we’ll stay on ours. Again, mind your own business.

From: bluesman
Date: 15-Jan-21




Grizz what does being Canadian have anything to do with his comment . Now you are telling us Canadians to stay on our side of the line ? Pretty sure a lot of people have opinions on what’s going on in the entire world be it USA , Canada, China , GB ETC .

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 15-Jan-21




Grizz when that fence line Hunter crosses the boundary to retrieve a deer, it becomes a crime. If you are on the property line probably %50 of your deer are going to die on someone else’s land and that is a problem. Hunting on the fence is not illegal, just disrespectful of the adjacent landowners and no, I do not hunt my fences.

From: Danny Pyle
Date: 15-Jan-21




You don’t tell me where to hunt on my land and I won’t tell you where to hunt on yours. And yes I will let my neighbor retrieve his deer from my land if it runs on there after he shoots it.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 15-Jan-21




From: GLF
Date: 15-Jan-21




thumper you and people like you are the problem, not people hunting their own property.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




Danny, that's completely appropriate. I'd do the same. Just don't shoot it while it's on my property. And ask permission or have an understanding before. What don't you guys get? Or don't you want to. This will go to 300 if you can't wrap your heads around common sense. You're scaring me now. Dweebs.

From: GLF
Date: 15-Jan-21




Exactly Swampwalker.

From: Danny Pyle
Date: 15-Jan-21




Swamp walker, I wouldn’t think of shooting on someone else’s property without permission . Or retrieve a deer without permission.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




Now we're getting somewhere. Question, gotta problem with someone sitting on your property line, hunting while looking into your property? That's what this whole thread is about. Except for our comrades looking at 300+ posts.

From: Dan In MI
Date: 15-Jan-21




Are we still arguing over the "thought and intent police?"

From: Danny Pyle
Date: 15-Jan-21




I can’t control what they are looking at nor do I want to as long as they don’t shoot on my property.

From: Danny Pyle
Date: 15-Jan-21




I can’t control what they are looking at nor do I want to as long as they don’t shoot on my property.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




Depends on what your thoughts and intentions are. Pretty simple really.

From: tradmt
Date: 15-Jan-21




50% of deer dying on someone else’s property isn’t necessarily a ‘problem’, some folks are completely ok with it because they are decent folk that realize they don’t own the deer and what goes around comes around. Illegal trespass is not what’s being discussed here, it was first a safety issue, which became silly in an instant, and now the reality is evident, it’s about antlers, as usual.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




Nah, never about antlers. About the right to own your own land. And what goes on, on YOUR land. Pretty simple really. I'll leave the thought police for my comrades, who have no nads, to realize your rights as a land owner. Really bore me. Carry on comrade, right to 300. It's your site, if you have the balls to keep it.

From: Nemophilist
Date: 15-Jan-21




It's always a good idea to have a good rapport with your neighbors.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




No doubt. Good neighbors respect property lines.

From: George D. Stout
Date: 15-Jan-21




Well, you do have a right to be a jerk to your neighbors, but you don't necessarily have an obligation. I'll help my neighbors find the deer, and help drag it over to their side. I don't get this hatred for your fellow landowners, especially neighbors.

From: GLF
Date: 15-Jan-21




Respecting property lines isn't the issye. Its about hunting your own propery close to the lines and the people talking about wasting a deer because it crossed the line befire it died.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




Wow! After all this and you still don't get it. Or don't want to. Pretty sad. You'll do well in this new dark age.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 15-Jan-21




This is ALL about respecting your neighbor. Putting a stand on the property line shows your neighbor no respect. Yes it is legal and you can do it if you want but that neighbor has no obligation to welcome you when 1/2 the deer your shoot ends up on his property. In my experience it is the people who hunt the property line that feel free to trespass to look for deer. The last two cases I filed trespassing on were just that, property line hunters who then trespassed to look for deer without asking. It’s your land, hunt where you want but if you don’t respect me as a neighbor then I am not likely to respect your request to trespass.

From: Rick Barbee Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jan-21




As I stated in an earlier post - I hunt the interiors of my properties, and stay off the property boundaries.

I do this for two reasons: (1) I don't not want to have an adverse effect on my neighbor's hunting if I can keep from it, and (2) I do not want to have to get permission to go after an animal I have shot on my property, but makes it onto the neighboring property.

I get along with all my neighbors, except one, and there is no getting along with her in any shape form, or fashion. I've tried to exhaustion.

Even with the neighbors I get along with (and have permission), I will not go onto their property without contacting them, and reaffirming that permission first, and every time it might be needed.

Rick

From: zonic
Date: 15-Jan-21




I don't like encountering armed strangers in our small wooded property. One year I came in to take the kids to school. When I went back out found rifle hunter in my stand in middle of our property. Called police. They told me hard to prosecute without posting, so we reluctantly posted. It's a long narrow woods behind our place. When we first moved here, I took down the 2 stands the previous owner had put up on 2 sides, within 10 yards of the property line - thinking my neighbors would appreciate that. Instead they all put up their own stands within 20 yards of the property line on all 3 sides (one side forbidden to hunting). A lot of pressure here in our part of the state and not much consideration from fellow hunters. Whatcha gonna do?

From: grizz
Date: 15-Jan-21




I have my opinions on Canadian politics and government but it’s not my country, so I have enough respect to keep my mouth shut. My post had nothing to do with physically crossing the border but having enough respect to confine yourself to the affairs of your own country. The post was pretty plain and simple. If you cannot understand it, then nothing I say will help.

From: zonic
Date: 15-Jan-21




Well said Rick Barbee. Feel the same.

From: bluesman
Date: 15-Jan-21




Just like this thread; you stay on your side of the line, we’ll stay on ours. Again, mind your own business ( your quote )

Grizz , I am not wanting to start a debate on politics but your above quote sure interprets to stay on our side of the line . If you mean politically speaking, no offence taken . Although you would be hard pressed to find the rest of the world not concerned about what’s going on because it does affect other countries in many ways .

Anyway this thread is not about politics or nations .

If I owned land and the deer were walking on a trail on my land close to my fence , I would hunt it . If it jumped the fence after I arrowed it . I would call my neighbor . If they did not let me on , I would contact the game warden . I believe here in most provinces they have the right to enter your land to retrieve game . I certainly would let my neighbor on my land to retrieve game .

From: tagalong2
Date: 15-Jan-21




I have shooting lanes that go to my fence line north and south. I know where the fence line is and don't shoot across it. My property is a long 40 which is 220 yards wide and half a mile long hence the lanes to the fence.

From: grizz
Date: 15-Jan-21




Ok, last thing I’ve got to say. I’ve been to Canada. I like Canada, I like Canadians, very nice and hospitable folks. Their beer, not so much. Having respect for them and the things in life they hold dear, I don’t bring my opinions nor make snide smart-ass remarks about their political processes or their government. Because it ain’t my country. My intention was to point out that people should NOT interject political comments into a thread so it will NOT become a political thread. Especially when it’s a country you do not even live in. We’ve all got problems enough of our own without stepping into others.

For the record, I keep good relations with my neighbors but I still mind my own business.

From: broken arrow
Date: 15-Jan-21




I use a portable stand every time I hunt, public or private. I hunt the tree where I need to be to kill a deer. If its close to a border so be it, if not same. I actually like it if a guy puts a stand near a border in the right position. The big deer will know where it is. Ill hunt the down wind side if I can where my buck will be. Ive never understood permeant stands. Mike

From: GLF
Date: 15-Jan-21




I think some misunderstood my posts. I hunt where I choose on my land. If the best spot is near a fence so be it. I just think its childist to try and control someone elses land. And even more chikdist to tell a person no if he asks to retrieve a deer. That hurt everyone because it doubles the number of deer kill and allows 1 to go to waste. Thats wasting a deer which is worse than childish.

From: bluesman
Date: 16-Jan-21




Grizz glad you clarified , you can come up here and have a beer with me sometime . I might be able to find one you like ... we’ve got some good IPA’s , But we are more known for our whiskey , maple syrup, cold weather , and hockey .

From: GF
Date: 16-Jan-21




I guess it wouldn’t shock me if the laws on recovery are different in Canada, because up there the animals belong to the crown, rather than being a common resource. That might affect whether or not a warning because the rate of access to private property even when the owner’s not too keen on the idea.

I grew up where land does not need to be posted. As a hunter, it’s your responsibility to know where you are and to stay off of private property if you don’t have permission to be there. Call me crazy, but setting up on a property line is just asking for problems. Not if you know your neighbor, and you get along, of course, but if relations are strained I don’t see much point in adding fuel to the fire.

Seems to me that there’s likely no way that an animal will get from one side of a property to the other without crossing through the middle of it at some point, so I guess maybe I’m thinking the smart move is to figure that out. Sometimes, of course, the best pinch point will be closer to the edge, and I guess you just have to figure out whether it makes sense to go there or not.

I guess I’m just not so motivated to kill a deer that I’m willing to provoke a dust-up with the neighbors if I can avoid it.

Pretty funny to watch threads like this on Bowsite, though… I saw one post where a guy was complaining about someone who had least hunting rights on a neighboring property that was something like 100 acres, with 97 1/2 of them under cultivation and 2 1/2 acres of woods. And the guy was ticked off because the people leasing the neighbor’s property had had the UNMITIGATED AUDACITY to set up tree stands in the wooded portion.

Duh.

If you want to be able to treat the neighbor’s farm like your own private food plot, I guess you’d better lease it from him or STUFF IT.

From: Beauxhunter
Date: 16-Jan-21




Swamp walker you have resorted to calling people dweebs and questioning their testicular fortitude I guess you have officially lost your argument. Maybe you should grow a set

From: grizz
Date: 16-Jan-21




Bluesman, Canadian whiskey is a whole different animal. That’s the good stuff!

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 16-Jan-21




Beaux, you are right. Anytime you revert to name calling is ridiculous. And I apologize. But not for my points. Point being, if you don't enforce your property rights, you have none.

From: Beauxhunter
Date: 16-Jan-21




Swampwalker I agree with enforcing and asserting property rights but we have to realize our property rights and at the line and there’s begin right on the other side of it. If there are safety issues I would address them with the adjoining land owner but that is as far as we can go. As hunters and a minority in the general public you should all find ways to get along with other hunters and not try to segregate and create division within our group as we must all stand to fight for our hunting rights at some point or they will all be lost

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 16-Jan-21




Agree with all of what you just said. Problem is the adjoining land owners aren't always of the same mindset. Particularly those who've owned their land thru generations. Had one set of neighbors who insisted they had every right because they'd always hunted it as kids. They turned to fence sitting in retaliation.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 16-Jan-21




I'm not a bully. Far from it. But I won't be bullied and I will always stand for what is right.

From: swampwalker Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 16-Jan-21




And yes, there is most definitely a safety factor involved. Contrary to others opinions.

From: Brassbandit
Date: 16-Jan-21




@swampwalker says the only guy that acted like bully and started calling people names. Priceless.

From: Thumper-tx
Date: 16-Jan-21




Swamp walker... I don’t know what law enforcement and the judicial system are like in your area but I have found that filing trespassing charges when they cross over tends to get bad neighbors back from the fence line. A $2500 fine gets most people’s attention.





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