Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Another turquoise toothpick.

Messages posted to thread:
George D. Stout 14-Mar-19
George D. Stout 14-Mar-19
George D. Stout 14-Mar-19
George D. Stout 14-Mar-19
George D. Stout 14-Mar-19
RymanCat 14-Mar-19
George D. Stout 14-Mar-19
Jim 14-Mar-19
Shawn Rackley 14-Mar-19
George D. Stout 14-Mar-19
bodymanbowyer 14-Mar-19
Knifeguy 14-Mar-19
White Falcon 14-Mar-19
fishin coyote 14-Mar-19
crookedstix 14-Mar-19
scs 15-Mar-19
monkeyball 15-Mar-19
South Farm 15-Mar-19
George D. Stout 15-Mar-19
casekiska 15-Mar-19
George D. Stout 15-Mar-19
George D. Stout 15-Mar-19
mangonboat 15-Mar-19
1968 Super Kodiak 15-Mar-19
George D. Stout 15-Mar-19
1968 Super Kodiak 15-Mar-19
From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Mar-19

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



My 1966 Black Hawk Scorpion. I cleaned it up a bit. For a plain-Jane it's quite a good shooter, and Cravotta Brothers wasn't afraid to use some colored glass. This is the belly side, but the back was also the same. I have the back sprayed for hunting.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Mar-19

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Mar-19

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Mar-19

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Mar-19

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



Limb tip back of bow after about 2000 arrows through it with a Fur, skinny low stretch string. No tip overlays on this bow and no wear in the nock areas.

From: RymanCat
Date: 14-Mar-19




Oh that's nice so dress her up I like them Black hawks. LOL

I have several Black Hawks in my collections.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Mar-19

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



From: Jim Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Mar-19




That is a nice looking bow there George.

From: Shawn Rackley
Date: 14-Mar-19




I'm jealous, I have been trying to find a black hawk scorpion for a while. I was bidding on one on the auction site but got out bid. Lol such is life. I'm sure one will come along. I actually like that turquoise glass

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Mar-19




That one photo should read "Fury" low stretch, not Fur.

From: bodymanbowyer
Date: 14-Mar-19




Good looking bow :-) JF

From: Knifeguy
Date: 14-Mar-19




Nice bow George, I like mine too. Noticed you don’t have a “Stout Special” elevated rest on it. Lance

From: White Falcon
Date: 14-Mar-19




I lived about 10 miles from them when I was a kid. Had no idea about them then.

From: fishin coyote
Date: 14-Mar-19




Yours is fancy compared to mine, looks good George

From: crookedstix
Date: 14-Mar-19




George, what were the differences between the Scorpion, Short Bee, and Short Hornet? I've never yet dug into the Cravotta Bros. bows.

From: scs
Date: 15-Mar-19




Tips on yours are a lot smaller than on my '74 model.

Steve

From: monkeyball
Date: 15-Mar-19




Kerry, Here is a bit of history on the Cravotta Bros. Back in the day I remember a local Hardware store across the river use to carry a lot of there lineup. I left many a "drool pool" over there looking at them......

I imagine if Frisky sees that aqua glass he's gonna have to have him one!

Good Shooting->->->->Craig

Some Cravotta Brothers' literature listed their company as Black Hawk (two words), and sometimes it was just Blackhawk (1 word). Nonetheless, the Black Hawk archery company was founded around 1950 by three Cravotta brothers: Charles Sr., Cosimo, and James. Charles Sr. was a physician and not directly involved in the operation of the business. Charles Jr. worked for the company for a time in the early 1950's until joining the military. After launching their bow making business, the brothers hired Gale Knott and his brother, two native Ojibewas, to help promote and demonstrate the Black Hawk bow line. The Knotts were family friends of the Cravottas and operated a fishing guide service where the Cravottas' vacationed each summer. Charles Jr. and the Knotts would shoot demonstrations of the bows at local rod-gun clubs, shooting heavy poundage (70#-90#) bows. Charles Jr. preferred the Blackhawk Hornet and would shoot broadheads into a bullet hole fired by a Winchester rifle to demonstrate accuracy.

The 1957 December edition of The Eastern Bowhunter magazine and the January 1958 NFAA Archery magazine featured display ads of the Blackhawk Brave bow. The brothers put out a full line of recurves, from high-end target bows, to hunting bows, to all-purpose and entry-level recreational bows. Target bows included the Apollo, Venue, King, Queen, and Chief. Hunting bows included the Hornet and Short Hornet. All-purpose bows included the Warrior, Black Bee, Yellow Jacket, Scorpion and Mosquito. Interestingly, for a company named Black Hawk, Cravotta never gave their bows any names for birds of prey, although a couple were given native american terms, such as the Chief and Warrior.

Black Hawk models that get good reviews include the Short Hornet, Warrior, Brave and Chief. The Cravotta brothers also produced the “Galaxie” line of bows, and also built bows for the Red Head company which was later purchased by Bass Pro.

From: South Farm
Date: 15-Mar-19




I have an old Indian with that same colored glass, not sure what model it is though. Took me a while to get used to it, but it grows on ya after a while.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Mar-19




The Scorpion is a semi-recurve, nowadays called hybrid. It's a deflex/reflex with wider limbs than a longbow and when strung the limb, near the tip, is not contacted by the string. Nothing fancy, just great shooters.

The Hornet, Short Hornet, Bee, etc., are recurves.

From: casekiska
Date: 15-Mar-19




Good history of the Black Hawk line of bows. Thanks for posing it, well done!

To me that sort of information has value. You posted it, you put it on-line or all to see. It has now been preserved for the sake of archery history. If someone does not do this sort of thing now all this historical information will be lost to the ages. When the guys who did it, i.e., the guys who were significant contributors back in the day, are gone there is no one to tell their stories. We fellows in the game today have a silent obligation to those generations who follow us to gather and preserve stories like this...our archery history...for later generations.

Again, thanks.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Mar-19

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



I believe the Brave became the Scorpion as it's the same length, and a semi-recurve/hybrid. Sometime in the late 50's or early 60's the eliminated the leather grip wrap. Here's a photo of a 1958 Brave.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Mar-19

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



From: mangonboat
Date: 15-Mar-19




Thats a good looking bow, George. The contrast between the turquoise on the belly and black you added to the back is really sharp.

From: 1968 Super Kodiak
Date: 15-Mar-19

1968 Super Kodiak's embedded Photo



George, may I share here, a Scorpion with red belly glass. My brother's Scorpion he received for his 11th birthday in 1963. I done a complete refinish on it recently only because sometime in the late senenties, I sprayed it with flat brown enamel for camo. I still need to make an original style strike plate for it. Nowadays this semi retired semi recurve gets plenty of much needed rest. All my brothers grew up shooting with it. Thanks for the topic George.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Mar-19




That looks really good Mark.

From: 1968 Super Kodiak
Date: 15-Mar-19




Tomorrow I may take a ride and give a more serious look at an early 70s 52# Blackhawk Scorpion I found hanging for sale (strung)on the rack of a sporting goods store. It has forest green glass front and back. It sure didn't feel 52# when I drew it. Now either the smooth drawing design is hiding the heft or it has been strung for who knows how long. A scale will tell all.





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