Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Juniper help

Messages posted to thread:
bugslinger 11-Jan-19
bugslinger 11-Jan-19
IdahoSteel 11-Jan-19
Elderly OCR 11-Jan-19
fdp 11-Jan-19
bugslinger 11-Jan-19
Spookinelk 11-Jan-19
bugslinger 11-Jan-19
IdahoSteel 14-Jan-19
bugslinger 14-Jan-19
fdp 14-Jan-19
osage 14-Jan-19
2 bears 14-Jan-19
Elderly OCR 15-Jan-19
neuse 15-Jan-19
Elderly OCR 15-Jan-19
From: bugslinger
Date: 11-Jan-19

bugslinger's embedded Photo



I just acquired this juniper and I’m wondering if it’s big enough to split again into two staves? This is the larger end I can provide any additional pics that may help. I don’t know much at all about building selfbows any advice is welcome.

From: bugslinger
Date: 11-Jan-19

bugslinger's embedded Photo



From: IdahoSteel
Date: 11-Jan-19




where did you get it? How much twist is in the stave? Do you have access to a band saw? Are you certain it is not one of the cedars? Do you have access to quality sinew?

Limb wise I would think you could spit it. But, you may have to glue on additional depth to the handle...

From: Elderly OCR
Date: 11-Jan-19




The quality of the stave is more important than the dimensions.

From: fdp
Date: 11-Jan-19




Depends on what kind of bow you want to make. It actually looks to me like it's going to have some twist in it so you are going to have to allow for that.

That peice in the background is going to twist as it dries if you don't clamp it down also.

From: bugslinger
Date: 11-Jan-19




I got it at my job site in the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado. It does have some twist in it, I thought I might be able to work out with steam?? I do have a band saw. No I’m not sure that it’s not a cedar, although I understand the two are often confused. I don’t have any sinew right now but have buddies that are supposed to save me some if they kill late season elk. I do have some good rawhide. I understand the quality is important, the dimensions are for reference. I’m not sure what kind of bow I’m looking to make, any suggestions?

From: Spookinelk
Date: 11-Jan-19




There is no Red Cedar in the SLV outside of the towns, so you can rest assured that it's Rocky Mountain Juniper if you got it there.

From: bugslinger
Date: 11-Jan-19




It came from Mtn Home Reservoir

From: IdahoSteel
Date: 14-Jan-19




I know the natives made shorter backed bows with it, I have as well. They are OK. More of a wall piece really. Still I think it really shines as a long bow or a flat bow(56 to 64)... the wood is very light once dried. I have found it nearly impossible to get a single stave long and straight enough however and have had to splice shorter staves. I have had some success steaming and bending it. But it is prone to pressure fractures. Also, I would plan on a sinew or rawhide backing from the start, even if just a super thin layer.

Best of luck.

From: bugslinger
Date: 14-Jan-19




I may save the best billets I can from it and season the rest to warm the hose. Thanks for all the reply's.

From: fdp
Date: 14-Jan-19




Juniper is a very under rated bow wood. Not only is it possibly the best North American wood to use in combination with a sinew backing, it also makes an outstanding American type longbow.

Juniper is a very resilient wood that will take a tremedous bend before it breaks if it is worked in a relatively consistent manner.

If I find relatively clear Juniper billets that are 30" or more long, I save very one of them. The width is what determines the type of bow they will be used for.

From: osage
Date: 14-Jan-19




I cut a Juniper in Nevada a few years ago. It would have been easier to make a propeller for a WW1 aircraft than a bow.

From: 2 bears
Date: 14-Jan-19




O.K. Juniper is a good bow wood. How do you recognize it? How do you tell it from all the cedars? I may have a good supply or not. It does look like it will be hard to find long enough stock for one piece bows. I have made hiking sticks from it. >>>>-----> Ken

From: Elderly OCR
Date: 15-Jan-19




Look for little blue berries.

From: neuse
Date: 15-Jan-19




I am in Texas, we have lots of cedar, cedar fence post very common. There are cedar bushes and cedar trees. I do not know how to distinguish what a juniper is.

From: Elderly OCR
Date: 15-Jan-19




Unfortunately local parlance usually makes trees into things they are not.

To most any evergreen is a Pine tree or a "Christmas Tree" with Cedar being the last option. Then you have the ones with actual accepted incorrect names like ERC, White Cedar and Western Red Cedar.

Undoubtedly many of your Texas "Cedars" are actually Juniper.





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