Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Nocking Point Preferred Material?

Messages posted to thread:
YamahaYG68 07-Dec-18
Viper 07-Dec-18
Bender 07-Dec-18
9/10 Broke 07-Dec-18
YamahaYG68 07-Dec-18
JusPassin 07-Dec-18
YamahaYG68 07-Dec-18
George D. Stout 07-Dec-18
Kent Alan 07-Dec-18
Jon Stewart 07-Dec-18
PECO 07-Dec-18
Rick Barbee 07-Dec-18
Jim 07-Dec-18
Pdiddly 07-Dec-18
ButchMo 07-Dec-18
Stringmaker 07-Dec-18
Codjigger 07-Dec-18
George Tsoukalas 07-Dec-18
Caughtandhobble 07-Dec-18
Muddyboots 07-Dec-18
Live2hunt 07-Dec-18
Orion 07-Dec-18
mangonboat 07-Dec-18
stickhunter 07-Dec-18
EasternEdge 07-Dec-18
MStyles 07-Dec-18
1968 Super Kodiak 07-Dec-18
flyfish1 07-Dec-18
Brian waters 07-Dec-18
Kodaman 07-Dec-18
paradocs 07-Dec-18
Supernaut 07-Dec-18
mahantango 07-Dec-18
2 bears 07-Dec-18
DarrinG 07-Dec-18
George D. Stout 07-Dec-18
2 bears 07-Dec-18
M60gunner 07-Dec-18
Rick Barbee 07-Dec-18
RonG 07-Dec-18
2 bears 07-Dec-18
Popester1 07-Dec-18
two4hooking 07-Dec-18
Riverwolf 07-Dec-18
NY Yankee 07-Dec-18
Deno 07-Dec-18
DarrinG 07-Dec-18
Jim Casto Jr 07-Dec-18
Tlhbow 07-Dec-18
Tlhbow 07-Dec-18
Trader 07-Dec-18
The Whittler 07-Dec-18
From: YamahaYG68
Date: 07-Dec-18




Checking to see what the material preferences are for nocking points.

From: Viper
Date: 07-Dec-18




Y -

After using just about everything out there, I settled on the brass ones with the plastic inside...

Viper out.

From: Bender
Date: 07-Dec-18




Tie on. Thread of some sort obviously.

Oddly enough I like mason's line. Yeah, its kinda fat, but with it I'm able to make a knot that doesn't move. Except when I move it on purpose during tuning when setting nock height. I just haven't been able accomplish that with serving thread. I invariably make it either too loose and it quickly comes apart into a mess. Or I make it too tight and can't move it except by cutting it off and starting over. If I could get the serving thread to cooperate I would switch to that.

I do periodically go back and try serving thread again when I see a different knot or method of tying it, but so far just not getting it for me.

From: 9/10 Broke Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Dec-18




Be sure to use the correct size. They have been known to become projectiles and have caused irreversible eye damage.

From: YamahaYG68
Date: 07-Dec-18




Yeah

Thats what I used from 1970 until recently.

I have tried some tied nocking points recently, liked them so far, but don't have a long history with them.

From: JusPassin Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Dec-18




Benn doing tied on for years. Got tired of fighting the little brass doohickeys. Had one come off and go zinging away.

From: YamahaYG68
Date: 07-Dec-18




For anyone tying them, have you used this material?

http://www.lancasterarchery.com/bcy-nock-point-peep-tying- thread.html

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Dec-18




Waxed dental floss. Ties tight, doesn't move and is cheap, which suits me a lot. I can tie a nock point in less than two minutes with an over/under tie off. I don't like material larger than that for nock sets.

I still use the brass ones when I have them as well. Never had one fly off in all the years I used them, and never saw one do that in all the competitive shooting I did in the 60's to the 80's. Not sure how that even happens with properly crimped brass nock set.

From: Kent Alan
Date: 07-Dec-18




Brass with rubber inside. Always small (blue) regardless of serving size. Never had a problem after crimping. God and Christ Bless!

From: Jon Stewart
Date: 07-Dec-18




60 years of dental floss

From: PECO
Date: 07-Dec-18




Either brass clamp on or waxed dental floss.

From: Rick Barbee
Date: 07-Dec-18




I've used a lot of different materials.

Just about anything works, especially after you've coated it with a little CA glue.

The only thing I require for my use is to make sure the material is large enough to get tight without it squeezing down & between the coils of the serving.

The past couple of years I have been using Flo Orange crochet thread, and I love it. It's basically the same thing as #4 nylon serving material.

Rick

From: Jim Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Dec-18




.030 Diamondback and a Barbee knot.

From: Pdiddly
Date: 07-Dec-18




Strands from used B-50 bowstrings that were on bows I bought.

I use a double constrictor knot...takes 15 seconds to tie one and burn off the ends. It can be twisted to adjust.

I put two on, above and below.

Brass nocks were wearing on my glove...

From: ButchMo
Date: 07-Dec-18




What Pdiddly said.

From: Stringmaker
Date: 07-Dec-18




I use the standard brass nock points to find where it needs to be set. Then I record that, then I put a tie-on nock point on . . .

BCY makes a great nock point material for tie on nock points. It is a bonded nylon. Nylon serving material will work . . .

Michael

From: Codjigger
Date: 07-Dec-18




Whenever i get a bow with a metal nock i remove it and tie on two nock points using waxed dental floss. Ron LaClair showed me that trick years ago. Sandy

From: George Tsoukalas
Date: 07-Dec-18




Dental floss, B 50, or serving thread. Jawge

From: Caughtandhobble
Date: 07-Dec-18




I use .030 BCY yellow serving material I tie a nail knot on top and bottom. I like the yellow because it is visible in low light conditions.

After my string has settled in I twist the nail knots out of the way and apply Barge glue on the string and twist the knot back in place. The Barge holds well and will not damage the string down the road. Another good thing about Barge, the knot can be moved if needed.

From: Muddyboots
Date: 07-Dec-18




B50, sewing thread or dental floss. The metal ones cut my face.

From: Live2hunt
Date: 07-Dec-18




I started using tie on ones. They are slick for adjusting if tied correctly. I keep trying to find the string I would like though, not to skinny and not too fat.

From: Orion Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Dec-18




Used metal nocks for many years. Then went to tie on nocks. Now I use masking tape (4 wraps of 3/4-inch) above and below the arrow nock. Quite durable and very easy to replace when it does start to wear. My arrow diameters range from thick woodies to skinny carbons and the fast/easy replacement feature comes in very handy.

From: mangonboat
Date: 07-Dec-18




Waxed dental tape. Seems to hold up better than floss and stays put better than old B50, although old B50 works a lot better if you wax it up.

From: stickhunter
Date: 07-Dec-18




For me as long as it is a tied nock...I’ve tried a bunch and settled on B50. I’ll use FF serving and tie movable nocks until I get a good tune and then change it out to B50...the wax in the B50 makes it very tight and also very durable. Buy one spool of B50 and it’ll last a looong time.

From: EasternEdge
Date: 07-Dec-18




Red serving thread tied on top with a 1/8" x 1" strip of cloth (hockey) tape stacked on bottom. The tape conforms to angle of nock at full draw, lasts for months and easy to replace

From: MStyles
Date: 07-Dec-18




I like the brass one with the black plastic insert. The larger, w/red plastic insert wears on my glove.

From: 1968 Super Kodiak
Date: 07-Dec-18




Black Sharpie line on a light colored serving. right up to dusk.

From: flyfish1
Date: 07-Dec-18




I use strands off of my old bow strings.One bow string will give you years of material.Better to recycle them than toss them.

From: Brian waters
Date: 07-Dec-18




I use 1/4" masking tape. Easily seen when nocking an arrow in low light.

From: Kodaman
Date: 07-Dec-18




Halo.....which is Spectra. size .014.....go up 6 turns and down 6 turns pulling the tag end under the 2nd down wrap with a loop. Tag ends away from the arrow location.

From: paradocs
Date: 07-Dec-18




Tried alot of different things over the years; had a spool of artificial sinew and tried tie-ons with it about 15 years ago. All I've used ever since.

From: Supernaut
Date: 07-Dec-18




I use artificial sinew. I had a brass nock point when I first got the bow but it was digging into my glove. Neighbor turned me on to the sinew and works for me.

From: mahantango
Date: 07-Dec-18




Flo orange D97. About six alternating overhand knots, clipped and burned. No glue needed.

From: 2 bears
Date: 07-Dec-18




Only takes once for a brass nock to put an eye out. String break,serving separation,wrong size,or brass failure from being reused. Masking tape to establish location then tied on. One old discarded bow string will last a very long time. Can't get any cheaper than that. >>>>-----> Ken

From: DarrinG
Date: 07-Dec-18




Brass crimp-on nocking points of appropriate size to close tight but not damage string or serving.

Been using them since the 80's and never had one fly off. Not even when using one on a 300FPS compound bow.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 07-Dec-18




Yeah, my dad told me a Red Ryder BB gun would shoot my eye out as well. There is also a chance that a car will pick up a rock and break your windshield...and then take your eye out. I mostly switched to tie-on nocks when I read about using dental floss from George Herter, back in the 1970's. It is cheap, and so am I. It makes great non-moving nock sets that last until you cut them off, so that's what I do most of the time.

I can't tell you how many shots I put through bows while using brass nock sets. In addition, 99% of the bows in all the shoots I ever went to used brass nocks by Saunders and never once heard about one failing, much less taking an eye out. Can it happen? Of course. Likely it won't even leave the string and you have more to worry about just driving to a shoot and driving home again. So anyway, I'll keep some around to use because the best indicator of future performance, is past performance.

From: 2 bears
Date: 07-Dec-18




That is great for you. Not a reason to cause others to take the risk. I know someone personalty that had to have one surgically removed from his eye.Losing an eye is not worth the risk. I had one cut my arm when a bowstring broke at the shot. Interesting thing is the arrow still hit the target. If you do every thing perfect you probably never will have one fail. Too bad we are all not perfect nor do we live in a perfect world. At least keep the opening facing you so it is more apt to go the other way,even if it comes of the rebounding string.We can't live risk free but it cost nothing to intelligently use safeguards.>>>----> Ken

From: M60gunner
Date: 07-Dec-18




I have used the brass nocking points, the plastic ones that require heat to shrink, and tie on using various materials. I found the BCY nock point thread to thick. Right now I am using the ugliest green bowstring material I have ever seen. The spool was a closeout at 3R last year. It’s some sort of FF. I use it to tie on my cat whiskers as well.

From: Rick Barbee
Date: 07-Dec-18




I've had a brass nock set break, and fly off the string. Put a nice little dent in my bow when it did.

It was my fault though. There's no telling how many times I had spread, then recrimped it.

Still, I like tie ons. I like them for the primary reasons that they are easy on tabs & gloves, and easy to adjust without the need of a tool to do it.

Rick

From: RonG
Date: 07-Dec-18




I hate brass and love tie-on's, I even have the special pliers to crimp them on with, anybody want them.

I have tried string material and it didn't work too well went back to serving and dental floss like a lot of guys. I rather use serving material to match the serving so it doesn't show up on my string. I tie like Rick Barbee showed us once.

I pull an arrow from my back quiver and have it nocked within four seconds and ready to draw without taking my eyes off the target. A great hunting technique.

From: 2 bears
Date: 07-Dec-18




A lost eye,a dented bow,a cut arm,yes it is rare but the slim chance is easily done away with and saves money too. Carry on. What ever floats your boat. >>>----> Ken

From: Popester1
Date: 07-Dec-18




I've been using the brass ones. I used to use red thread with fingernail polish painted over it to keep it from unraveling.

From: two4hooking
Date: 07-Dec-18




unwaxed floss

From: Riverwolf
Date: 07-Dec-18




...floss, b-50 or similar . Simple overhands front to back and doubled at the end 1/8"-3/16" will do fine ;)

From: NY Yankee
Date: 07-Dec-18




I have a big spool of nylon upholstery thread I got at a garage sale. I like it because you don't need much to make a nock locator and the ends melt in with a lighter. PM me, Ill send you some.

From: Deno
Date: 07-Dec-18




Waxed thread tie on.

Deno

From: DarrinG
Date: 07-Dec-18




>>>"I hate brass and love tie-on's, I even have the special pliers to crimp them on with, anybody want them."<<<

I'll take them!

From: Jim Casto Jr
Date: 07-Dec-18




#4 Nylon serving for decades.

From: Tlhbow
Date: 07-Dec-18




I'm fine with the brass nocks.never seen one break òr a string break other than one I hooked on my bibs. I mostly tie one up with serving using the over hand knot back and forth.

From: Tlhbow
Date: 07-Dec-18




I was not being beigerent about the brass nocks and hope no one gets hurt using them. I do wonder what caused the failure though . I could see cracking them with nocking pliers

From: Trader
Date: 07-Dec-18




Dental floss or artificial sinew.

From: The Whittler
Date: 07-Dec-18




Dental floss and an old low stretch Flemish string I took apart. Use the mint floss when you come back to anchor you can get a little taste if you do it right :-).





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