Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Best shooting instructor/classes

Messages posted to thread:
Gunner 05-Dec-18
Viper 05-Dec-18
Babbling Bob 05-Dec-18
Bowmania 05-Dec-18
George D. Stout 05-Dec-18
JRW 05-Dec-18
George D. Stout 05-Dec-18
George D. Stout 05-Dec-18
Thumper 05-Dec-18
Mo0se 05-Dec-18
Liquid Tension 05-Dec-18
Bassman 05-Dec-18
Bowmania 05-Dec-18
Pointer 05-Dec-18
Bowguy 05-Dec-18
fdp 05-Dec-18
Bowguy 05-Dec-18
Thumper 05-Dec-18
Bowguy 06-Dec-18
Liquid Tension 06-Dec-18
cch 06-Dec-18
Bowguy 06-Dec-18
CMF_3 06-Dec-18
Bowmania 06-Dec-18
Bowmania 06-Dec-18
Carolinabob on iphon 06-Dec-18
DT1963 06-Dec-18
Liquid Tension 06-Dec-18
HighNTree 06-Dec-18
From: Gunner
Date: 05-Dec-18
Gunner is a Stickbow.com Sponsor - Website




I live in Southern Ca. Have never taken formal shooting lessons, any suggestions on best bang for my buck if I did?

From: Viper
Date: 05-Dec-18




Gunner -

Unless you actually know nothing about archery, I would NEVER recommend a one or two day "celebrity" seminar. Most are pretty generic and most people forget 90% of what was taught before they leave. And quite frankly, you can learn as much from the Internet as you can from a prepared generic speech.

Std recommendation: Find a local club or range and see who people there suggest you work with. You'll also have the advantages of watching them shoot and get one on one training specific to your needs. How many lessons you take depends on your needs and goals.

Viper out.

From: Babbling Bob Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 05-Dec-18




Found mine locally as Viper suggested and he and his wife took me to several events and introduced me to people for two years after I started with him. This provided some continued support. When I started long ago,I had only shot some and was not experienced, so I was looking for start-up information, not improvement on past experience. I was fresh for learning the coach's way.

Found my coach (many years ago) through my Dad who was a TV Director/Producer and had the coach's wife (a National Champion) on a tv show doing trick shots. Used to see this situation some at booths at outdoors shows too, but nowdays, those booths would most likely be wheelie shooters, which can be different.

Since our recurve/longbow interest is not the most popular archery method out there, you may have to travel, and hopefully not too far which would take you away from continued coaching. Look for that super shooter locally and that person may know. Good luck, and hope some here can help.

From: Bowmania Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 05-Dec-18




Viper, has some good points, but taking the Rod Jenkins class was one of the best things I've done to mover forward in archery and I'd been at it 40 years. The internet can't point a finger and say, 'this is where your shot is off'.

Here's a link to finding a coach in your area: https://www.teamusa.org/USA-Archery/Judges-and-Coaches/Coaches/USA-Archery-Coach-Locator

Hope that works. Before you decide on a coach ask a lot of questions. One of the last should be, what kind of archery do you shoot? I had a guy say he ran into a coach that wouldn't let him anchor in the corner of his mouth - oly archer. You are better off with an Oly archer than a compound guy.

Bowmania

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 05-Dec-18




What Tony said. There are many very good to top-notch archers at many of the clubs throughout the country. You don't have to be well-known to be able to teach proper form. We sometimes go out of our way to complicate what form is and how hard it is to learn, but it is something that can be taught quite well on the local scene. Follow Tony's advice if you have a club within a reasonable drive.

From: JRW
Date: 05-Dec-18




Rod Jenkins

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 05-Dec-18




I remember when Southern California was a hot bed of archery, including some top coaches. Too bad we don't have that time machine to visit some of those times. My guess is there still should be a few around that area. Have you tried a internet search for archery instructors?

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 05-Dec-18




I'm in no way dismissing Rod Jenkins as a quality coach, just looking for other regional options so folks don't have to buy an airline ticket to get basic information.

From: Thumper
Date: 05-Dec-18




The best start would be to find someone that consistently hits what they are aiming at, and ask them for some pointers. Most traditional archers are nice guys. You get quite a few fat heads at the 3D shoots though in my experience.

A coach can't "make" you shoot better. That's on you. They show you where you're screwing up, and how to fix it. Just having someone watch and offer pointers may be all you need to get off to a running start.

All that said, if I had the means I'd go see John Schulz :) That's if he is still doing classes.

From: Mo0se
Date: 05-Dec-18




The internet is the cause of 95% bad information Viper. Nothing replaces Human interaction. With that said there are some out there peddling snake oil seminars. Rod ain't one of them.

From: Liquid Tension
Date: 05-Dec-18




Agree with Moose. A hands on Coach or good Archer to teach a newbie that the correct way to shoot is with a Sequence & Back Tension. Those two things right there will save an Archer years of grief & struggling.

Also learning how to practice properly with a purpose with the Bale to ingrain his form & be able to fix problems when things go awry. Finally if I’m taking a plane ride it’s not to see Jenkins, you go to Cardinale in Jersey. No disrespect to Rod but Len forgot more than he knows & Rod will tell you that. There used to be a running joke that there wasn’t an Archer Len couldn’t fix in an hour!

From: Bassman Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 05-Dec-18




Basic information can be gotten off internet if you know who to watch.Jim Blackmon, and Arny Moe,and Viper if he had a video, and many others.They know their stuff.A coach can show you the proper way like said above, then it is up to you to execute, and that is another story.

From: Bowmania Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 05-Dec-18




I would agree with Moose and disagree with Thumpers statement, "The best start would be to find someone that consistently hits what they are aiming at, and ask them for some pointers." About three years ago a guy won our state trad tourney. He never once got to within an inch of full draw.

It's one of archery's main problems - bad things work (sometimes). A coach should coach good form, which is consistent form, which is repeatable form. Those last two define what good form is. By it's very nature consistent and repeatble form is what Oly Coaches coach.

Bowmania

From: Pointer
Date: 05-Dec-18




It's a shame you are a left coast guy Gunner....around my neck of the woods on Long Island, NY...we go find Tony...Viper...the guy who posted the first response to your thread :)

From: Bowguy Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 05-Dec-18




I think Bowmania has it exactly right. What Moose said is def true. Here’s the prob someone who already knows can decipher the good guys on the internet. The rest don’t know what they don’t know. Bad form if done repeatedly can lead to consistancy but you can learn that on your own. Get a good local coach and learn proper form

From: fdp
Date: 05-Dec-18




So someone define "bad form". And let's NOT make the comparison to the way someone else shoots. What is the diference between "bad form" and "good form"? While there are certain things that are foundational, and MUST be repeated consistently, it doesn't mean it has to be repeated the way that someone else did it. And everyone doesn't have to do all the steps that someone else does. Look Rick Welch. Rick Welch's relase hand is horrible, and rarely does the same thing 2 times in a row, but he's one of the best that there ever was.

There is more than 1 correct way to shoot a bow. And one of the things that folks need to do is decide how they want to learn, and then find someone to mentor them in learning to shoot that way.

The gentleman that Bowmania mentioned, while maybe "shooting wrong" by the defintion of many, was obviously doing more than 1 thing more correctly and consistently than everyone else in the shoot. So...in that contecxt his form" was virtually perfect. ANd although it sounds as if maybe he was a dreaded "snap shooter" it sound like he probably whipped some more dedicated "target types" ?

The way a person shoots a bow best has a LOT to do with their personality. Some like slow and deliberate, some don't, and there's nothing wrong with that. Find the style that suits YOU, and is enjoyable for YOU, and then perfect it.

From: Bowguy Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 05-Dec-18




FDP there are fundamentals. I’m not gonna go through the list cause I’m sure you know them. This is why I say even bad form if repeated exactly can lead to consistancy (accuracy). The best archers/instructors though would strive to teach good form. It’s easier to repeat and lends itself to the accuracy. A fellow that teaches w me is the state champ. His grip is not perfect. He has developed a system through prob very much extra time that is repeatable. Does he teach that way? No he has enough sense to teach proper technique as that’s easier to repeat. A good instructor can also help you avoid pitfalls. They know what may lead to other issues. A good instructor is a worthwhile investment. There is such a thing as good form. Lots of guys make excuses for Improper form. The next generation should learn better than we were taught. Or were we actually taught at all??

From: Thumper
Date: 05-Dec-18




FDP, Amen to that. I'm sure nobody went up to the guy "that never got within an inch of full draw" and told him he was doing it wrong, after he just finished handing out an ass whoopin'. That guy obviously got to HIS full draw, and he released when he was ready.

Thing is, you can decide to shoot the way "this guy" or "that guy" shoots just for the sake of doing it perfectly textbook, and never get it. Some styles just don't work exactly perfect for all people.

If I trained to shoot like the olympic archers, and only that way, I would have had to pass on damn near every animal I have ever took a shot at. I'm usually wadded up on the ground under brush or in some kind of thick mess, and standing up with a 66" longbow completely vertical and taking 10 seconds to shoot just isn't an option.

I'm in no way saying that Oly shooting style/form/whatever isn't the best. It probably is. But for me, it is absolutely useless. To someone else, most likely the majority, it's fine. I'm not in the game to shoot high scores, I'm in the game to 1) have fun and relax and 2) kill critters, big and small.

All this said to say this: I recommended the OP find someone local and ask for pointers. Which is most likely free, and also with no commitment to stick with it that way. It's certainly the best "bang for the buck" IMO. I mean, what if the OP is a real natural and a little instruction is all he ever needs anyway? He could be coaching you experts by next year for all we know.

Once you find out if this style or that style seems to be best for you, then go all in and find a coach that is willing to teach that way and invest your time and money.

An example: Rod Jenkins literally lives in the same small town in Alabama that I do. I've met him and he's a super nice guy and a great shot. I never bugged him to help me shoot because I know it likely won't work for me. I'm not going to waste his time or mine.

As with a lot of things in life, there are a lot of ways to accomplish the same goal. Find what works for you, and run with it. But for starting somehwere and just "dipping a toe", just ask for help from someone that seems to be successful. Just remember as with all things in life, take anything (even from an expert) with a grain of salt and an open mind.

From: Bowguy Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 06-Dec-18




Thumper there nothing magical that makes you accurate just because you want it so. No one said you need Olympic style archery and that’s not even what I teach. I think that’s ridiculous (Olympic style archery) unless that’s your preferred method/reason for shooting. And your point about dif type shots is well taken but your missing something? You need to be able to shoot from all positions. Or the more you can surely the better. The best way to get there is proper technique. From there maybe some modifications but still you need to be consistant. Best way is through attempt at proper form, variations from there are easier. Now as I said anything is possible. Let’s put it this way, very simply is the op more likely to reach full potential learning proper form or not anchoring cause he’s read somewhere someone thinks it’s ok or someone is good that way? Op do what you like. If you wanna believe you can just shoot and reach full potential maybe you can. I’d say more than likely not and def not as quickly. I say this all the time but think about something, guys don’t know what they don’t know as this thread shows unfortunately. No disrespect intended to others who think differently or what works for them but it’s not about what works for so n so. It’s whats best for the op and that’s why he asked.

From: Liquid Tension
Date: 06-Dec-18




Why is this argued I’ll never understand? Proper grip, bow arm arm alignment, draw elbow position, Repeatable Anchors, Stance, along with Back Tension etc are not negotiable. A good Coach will establish these with a new Archer & ingrain them on the Bale. Then he will link these together into a disciplined Sequence. Form is not established thru an Archers feelings. It’s pounded home thru repetition ingrained on the Bale.

Any decent Coach this is how he will teach with his own slight variation. They are not gonna tell a guy to shoot how he feels as he can do that @ home. A Coaches purpose is to give an Archer a Solid Shot Sequence & Foundation that will last. No COACH will ever tell an Archer to just fling arrows based on how he feels.

Furthermore it’s never discussed here but useless practice without a purpose does more harm than good. 20 intensely focused Arrows done right beats 200 any day.

From: cch
Date: 06-Dec-18




Look up Shot IQ, find one of Joel Turner and Tom Clumbs shooting courses. They do several around the country every year. They do one in Texas that is a combo hog hunt. And they have online courses also.

From: Bowguy Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 06-Dec-18




Well said liquid tension!!

From: CMF_3
Date: 06-Dec-18




Rod Jenkins. The cost to fly to Alabama and take a 1x1 lesson is about the same as a new bow, but will help you way more than buying equipment.

From: Bowmania Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 06-Dec-18




I like Liquid Tension's last post. Most should go back and read it.

I shoot Olympic style archery, except the chin anchor. I've killed animals out to 45 yards. Yet, I've also killed 22 animal on the run. My 45 yard shot maybe takes 5 seconds (if I go longer the odd of a good shot go down), BUT on a running shot from draw to release takes about 2+ seconds. Basically a snap shot. I killed a 152 inch buck on the run and I know I didn't get to fuld draw, but I had to shoot now, because the deer was at a 18 inch hole in the brush.

Actually if you shoot oly style and hunting weight it's pretty tough to make a good shot and hold longer than 5 seconds period.

Funny thing about the guy that didn't come to full draw. I haven't seen or heard of him being back in the shoot offs since. With that form it's a pretty good bet that TP took over.

I believe I've described what good form is. A term I didn't use is easily repeatable. And the great thing about that is it makes it easier to learn.

Bowmania

From: Bowmania Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 06-Dec-18




Here's an important fact which I thought it was a good idea to let it stand alone. Unless you shoot as good as Brady Ellison you need a coach.

Why??????????????????????????????????????????????/

BECAUSE BRADY ELLISON HAS A COACH!!!

Here something also true. Al Henderson's wife was asked what's the hardest thing to do in archery. She was a national champ many times. She said something like, getting your body to do what your mind thinks it is doing!!!

GETTING YOUR BODY TO DO WHAT YOUR MIND THINKS IT IS DOING.

The last day of the Rod Jenkins class he videos everyone. When he and I discussed my shot he said, 'what do you see?' If I didn't see it in the video, you couldn't have made me believe I was doing it.

Bowmania

From: Carolinabob on iphon
Date: 06-Dec-18




Look on the Internet. Good start is a video by Rick Welch, thingI learned is how to set-up my arrows to aid in a consistent draw, next Ty Pelfrey on how to string walk. Keep a journal or how you are doing.

From: DT1963
Date: 06-Dec-18




A tripod and camcorder is the best coach there is.

From: Liquid Tension
Date: 06-Dec-18




@ Dt1963 right you are, once your essentials are established. Also DT I’ll send videos of myself to fellow Archers to look @. Obviously Archers you trust & respect.

From: HighNTree
Date: 06-Dec-18




Gunner,

I took shooting lessons from Rick Welch twelve years ago. At the time I said that it was the best money I ever spent in archery. Twelve years later...I say the same thing.

Lessons from an instructor with a proven track record can save you many years of trial and error.

Shoot Straight,

HighNTree





If you have already registered, please

sign in now

For new registrations

Click Here




Visit Bowsite.com A Traditional Archery Community Become a Sponsor
Stickbow.com © 2003. By using this site you agree to our Terms and Conditions and our Privacy Policy