Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Big bear at 20 yds...

Messages posted to thread:
Nemah 13-Jun-18
Timbukto 13-Jun-18
Bowguy 13-Jun-18
T4halo 13-Jun-18
ca 13-Jun-18
Liquid Tension 13-Jun-18
elkherder 13-Jun-18
deerhunt51 13-Jun-18
Blackhawk 13-Jun-18
Knifeguy 13-Jun-18
David McLendon 13-Jun-18
LBshooter 13-Jun-18
twostrings 13-Jun-18
mangonboat 13-Jun-18
David McLendon 13-Jun-18
sammyg 14-Jun-18
Jinkster 14-Jun-18
David McLendon 14-Jun-18
Babbling Bob 14-Jun-18
David McLendon 14-Jun-18
David McLendon 14-Jun-18
David McLendon 14-Jun-18
GF 14-Jun-18
DarrinG 14-Jun-18
mangonboat 14-Jun-18
David McLendon 14-Jun-18
Nemah 14-Jun-18
Wapiti - - M. S. 15-Jun-18
elkherder 15-Jun-18
mangonboat 15-Jun-18
Ron LaClair 16-Jun-18
unhinged 16-Jun-18
Nemah 17-Jun-18
Nemah 17-Jun-18
Nemah 17-Jun-18
Mountain Man 17-Jun-18
DarrinG 17-Jun-18
From: Nemah
Date: 13-Jun-18




Last night I was walking my new puppy Rusty and my Golden Retriever Jake in our usual area, our neighbors' 80 acre patch of woods. The neighbor recently cut a new road around the outside of the property for his 2 young sons to ride their youth motorcycles and 4-wheelers on. Rusty, my 6 mo. old cross between a Springer Spaniel and a Swiss Mountain Dog, led the way, but he was spooky, carefully smelling every bush and fern that over-hung the new trail, hackles up. Suddenly he came to a complete stop in mid stride, looking intently into the heavy brush and young Doug Fir trees, and let out a low, deep growl. Jake did the same, hackles up. I followed their stare and a huge black bear slowly rose up on its' hind legs, only 20 yards away, staring back at us! My only thought was, "please....no cubs!" I always carry my 9mm Glock on our hikes, and I drew the gun and shouted, "Go on" as loud as I could. Nothing....the bear stood its' ground. The dogs were now barking and growling, and Rusty headed down the trail toward home, barking and crying loudly. Once again I yelled at the bear, this time waving my arms, and the bear finally dropped down on all fours and took off directly away from us, crashing through the heavy underbrush, thank God! Rusty finally returned, and we continued our evening hike, the dogs playing as if nothing had happened. Richard

From: Timbukto
Date: 13-Jun-18




Six weeks till Washington Bear season. Tie him to a tree!!!!!!!

From: Bowguy Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 13-Jun-18




Around here you have close encounters all the time. They never run. Right over the state border they’re hunted harder and the story is dif. I can’t stand em. The only thing I like about em is eating them

From: T4halo
Date: 13-Jun-18




I've got one of those Mountain dog pups. She's 5 months and looks like a bear.

Glad all worked out and the dogs didn't chase.

T4

From: ca
Date: 13-Jun-18




How is your knee doing?

From: Liquid Tension
Date: 13-Jun-18




Forget the 9mm & get a 45!

From: elkherder
Date: 13-Jun-18




You make sure and drop that bear for those kids sakes.No way I'm letting kids ride anything in the area with a big bear living there.Needs to be dealt with...And buy a .45 or bigger if I was you.Just sayin.

From: deerhunt51
Date: 13-Jun-18




Any time I am serious I load a 12 gauge with slug or buck shot, pistol is last choise.

From: Blackhawk
Date: 13-Jun-18




Bear encounters like that always get my hackles up too.

Some say get a bigger gun, but a 9mm is better than nothing.

From: Knifeguy
Date: 13-Jun-18




Glad the bear adventure worked out ok all around. Stay safe! I agree with Lon, a 9mm is better than then the nothing that I have. Lance

From: David McLendon
Date: 13-Jun-18




You are better off with a can of bear spray, I carry a Glock 29 and can of Guard Alaska. Spray 2, Glock 0, nobody hurt, nobody had to die, and everybody went home.

From: LBshooter
Date: 13-Jun-18




Get some of those Leigh extreme penetrators, 15 of those should put down a black bear if the need arises.

From: twostrings
Date: 13-Jun-18




I could have had the Glock, the spray and a 12 gauge and I still would have beat Rusty to the county line.

From: mangonboat
Date: 13-Jun-18




No grizzlies in the mountains hereabout but lots of black bears and I encounter them frequently walking my two labs every morning at sunrise. We recently woke up a big boar sleeping next to the trail. A couple tense moments with mamas and cubs but patience, a cool head and two dogs works every time. One old girl was 10 yards away eating pignut hickory nuts within 75 yards of my house last fall. Her cub was 6 yards away. Never occurred to me that a sidearm or bear spray was required to share the woods with black bears.

From: David McLendon
Date: 13-Jun-18




Usually it's not required, but if and when you run up on the rare one that it is, talking it over with him is a poor option. I've never had a problem in NC either, the two that required attention elswhere, one was black and one was not.

From: sammyg
Date: 14-Jun-18




Several mentioned carrying bear spray,for me I'm not sold. Especially after reading the article in the June edition of the NRA's American Hunter magazine. The article is on a class being offered for people working in back country situations where they may encounter bears.It talks about bear sprays and says that after use, bear spray residue is an attractant. As for carrying a firearm,I'd carry the heaviest caliber that you can shoot accurately as far as a handgun goes.

From: Jinkster
Date: 14-Jun-18




mangonboat....

"Never occurred to me that a sidearm or bear spray was required to share the woods with black bears."

Google up....

"Black Bear Maulings in Florida"

It seems to me that when there's just one Black Bear?...your chances are pretty good...(especially if you have something to take a dominant stance aned scare them off with)...but if there's more than one Black Bear?...you gotta problem.

From: David McLendon
Date: 14-Jun-18




You can talk it to death about how it's not needed all you want to, but I will tell you from experience on a moose hunt on the Tichik River that the speed and short amount of time that it took when a previously undetected 400ish pound sow Grizzly exploded from the bush from about 60-80 feet in practically incomprehensible. Sh_t got real in a big hurry and by the time that two out of three of us got spray in action she was closing through 30 down to 10 feet so fast in a blur that she looked 10 feet long. When she hit the spray she did not stop or run the other way but veered off and passed us by at 6-8 feet. Life was viewed in flashes of black and white snapshots, there was not time for even thinking about getting a firearm into action, and if anyone had, then we would have been wearing a totally pissed off wounded bear. I don't hunt bears anymore and haven't since 2002, I don't eat them and they get a pass as a professional courtesy as a fellow predator, the last thing that I want to do is to kill another bear. Many handgun calibers will kill a large bear , but they will take their time about dying and you'll likely have their undivided attention while they do it. I still and will carry my 10mm, but when it hits the fan my hand goes for the can, your mileage may vary, feel free to use Zen or "The Force" or whatever works for you but bear spray does work more often than it doesn't.

From: Babbling Bob Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 14-Jun-18




Good story David about how fast those spray cans came out. Seems like those bears can have a temperament about as fragile as my first boss.

Most of the time where I am at in the summer and fall in the Adirondacks, they just come up into someone's yard looking for good eats. One came into a neighbors house two years ago looking for the cookies his wife just baked. Made himself right at home. His nephew just down the road turned a bear that got too neighborly into a rug just a few years before.

From: David McLendon
Date: 14-Jun-18




I never actually got mine out of the carrier but flipped the safety block out and shot it from the hip, it happened that fast. It was early afternoon and I think that we woke her up, never saw or heard any cubs and she was still digging in throwing dirt and rocks all the way so it was not a bluff, she was coming. We were going to fish for some dinner, but we didn't eat or sleep much that night.

From: David McLendon
Date: 14-Jun-18




I never actually got mine out of the carrier but flipped the safety block out and shot it from the hip, it happened that fast. It was early afternoon and I think that we woke her up, never saw or heard any cubs and she was still digging in throwing dirt and rocks all the way so it was not a bluff, she was coming. We were going to fish for some dinner, but we didn't eat or sleep much that night.

From: David McLendon
Date: 14-Jun-18




Oops… I got that double post by dusting some dog hair off the laptop, gotta be more careful with this antiquated format.

From: GF
Date: 14-Jun-18




I’ve always had my doubts about being able to quick-draw a can of spray... but I’ll bet I’m not the only one who’d be a lot more effective with it shooting from the hip...

And really, if you’ve got to unsnap a strap before you can pull out a hand-cannon, the speed differential is probably negligible...

From: DarrinG
Date: 14-Jun-18




A round shot in the dirt in front of a aggressive bear from a firearm is often enough to turn them without ever having to shoot to kill. The boom and the dirt flying is a good stopper for a bear who's being a pain. I've seen it happen. Your mileage may vary.

From: mangonboat
Date: 14-Jun-18




It's only a unproveable theory, but I figure polar bears are 5 times bigger than people, rarely are threatened by people, almost exclusively carnivorous and dont consider humans as much other than a potential meal, so I avoid being in their territory. Likewise grizzlies, although those who are in areas frequented by humans probably have developed some sense of uncertainty about them as a food source. Blackbears are omnivorous, mostly vegetarian, and in the populated areas encounter humans on a regular basis and have probably evolved not to consider humans as a prime food source, as that has a high incidence of bear death shortly after dining. So if those black bears are doing their part not to incite high-stress encounters with me, I will try a reciprocal approach until I see a reason not to. I've been bluff charged, had young boars pass by at 6 feet then stop to mark their territory, had lots of popping teeth and woofing, but Ive also been in close among a sow with five cubs, half of them sleeping , half of them eating and playing, and listened to their barely audible means of keeping in contact with each other. No bears were mauled. But I'm not recommending anything to anybody as my attitude and approach is largely the result of first hand experience in a specific bear population area. Now I have two labs that grew up among bears, and they have relatively advanced bear interaction skills, but so far they all manage to go home intact afterwards.

From: David McLendon
Date: 14-Jun-18




I'll agree that NC Black Bears by and large are rarely a problem, there will now and then be the odd one but generally they are pretty easy to get along with probably like most Black Bears around the country. I will say that I have found coastal Black Bears in AK to be a different animal than here in NC as they are more aggressive. One of my hunting partners on the TikChik River trip lives in MT and said that he believed that the MT Grizzlies were much more short tempered and risky than the AK Grizzlies. We saw eight goliath bears on that float and they were all about minding their business. The one sow that we dealt with gave all the thrills that may have been needed, and it was just a difficult situation and nobody's fault. By the time she realized we were there, we were too close for her to feel comfortable. I honestly believe that she planned to single out whoever the slow guy happened to be and give him a piece of her mind, but nobody ran and fortunately it didn't go that way.

From: Nemah
Date: 14-Jun-18




Rusty and Jake led the way down the trail earlier this evening toward where we spotted the bear. I followed them with a can of bear spray on my belt, a Glock in my holster, and a loud whistle around my neck. Two years ago a big bear ravaged an apple tree not 40' from the neighbors' front door, gorging himself for hours on over-ripe apples. Got it all on a trail cam. A wildlife agent saw the photos and estimated the big male to weigh 350-400 pounds. Tonight, the tension was high as we passed that tree and entered the deep, dark woods. We made a lot of noise on our hike and the only animals we saw were a few baby bunnies. The puppy busted one of the little devils out of the brush and he came right at me at 50'. I pulled out the bear spray in one hand and the Glock in the other, but the fuzzy little critter veered off to my right when I hit the whistle. What a close call! Be safe out there! Richard

From: Wapiti - - M. S. Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 15-Jun-18




Glad you & your dogs are safe,be careful.

From: elkherder
Date: 15-Jun-18




500 S&W Holstered on my right leg.

From: mangonboat
Date: 15-Jun-18




Glad to hear that Rusty and Jake weren't tore up by that lagamorph! You never know what they are going to do.

From: Ron LaClair
Date: 16-Jun-18

Ron LaClair's embedded Photo



Standard protection in bear country

From: unhinged
Date: 16-Jun-18




Get some pepper spay, it's lighter and more effective and less lethal than lead spray on Bears.

From: Nemah
Date: 17-Jun-18

Nemah's embedded Photo



I put a trail cam up in the area I spotted the bear.....Here's 2 cubs.

From: Nemah
Date: 17-Jun-18

Nemah's embedded Photo



And here's mom! I guess I was very lucky that the cubs weren't between me and mom!

From: Nemah
Date: 17-Jun-18

Nemah's embedded Photo



Here's the boys, Rusty and Jake, the day after the bear encounter. I went back to retrieve the trail cam card tonight and found the two photos I just posted. No sign of the bears tonight.

From: Mountain Man
Date: 17-Jun-18

Mountain Man's embedded Photo



Better to have it and not need it,,,then need it and not have it

From: DarrinG
Date: 17-Jun-18








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