Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Catquiver 7.5

Messages posted to thread:
Bulls & Bucks 11-Jan-18
fdp 11-Jan-18
Buglmin 11-Jan-18
David McLendon 11-Jan-18
GF 11-Jan-18
BSBD 12-Jan-18
Michael Schwister 12-Jan-18
Michael Schwister 12-Jan-18
Michael Schwister 12-Jan-18
bluesman 17-Jan-18
From: Bulls & Bucks
Date: 11-Jan-18




A friend and I are planning a trip to Colorado for elk I'm looking into the catquiver 7.5 as a day pack but I'm wondering if it would be able to pack some meat out nothing to much maybe back straps. We will have frame packs at camp I would just hate to make a trip out completely empty handed if it can be avoided. Thanks

From: fdp
Date: 11-Jan-18




Yep. If you don't have it too full of other stuff. Just take some meat bags or old pillow cases with you.

Another option, my preference, is to strap a smaller model to the pack frame and wear it.

From: Buglmin
Date: 11-Jan-18




The Catquivers don't have the best harness systems for carrying heavy loads far. The internal frame system isn't designed to support a lot of weight. I used to secure a mini catquiver to my pack, worked great. Plus I had a pack that could carry 40# to 60# comfortably.

From: David McLendon
Date: 11-Jan-18




It is still a wasted trip when you could be using a real daypack on a frame designed for packing meat and a Bow Mate or cat quiver mini strapped on. Those needless empty steps will mean a lot when you look back on it

From: GF
Date: 11-Jan-18




I dunno.....

Getting meat off the bone too quickly can make it tough, or so I’ve been told.

I’m not convinced that I could carry a front and a rear quarter of a good-sized Elk in a single trip. 20 years ago, I brought down #110 of mule deer in one shot, and it was an accomplishment (for a guy weighing about #135), but nothing I expect to repeat.

So I’m not sure that bringing off the back straps in the first trip would actually save me a whole trip, and there’s no such thing as a half. And I’m not sure that rushing it that way would do anything for the quality of my meat. So… What would be the point?

So do what makes sense for you, but I’d agree that the CQ line is not great for carrying real weight. Main thing to do (IMO, having done it the hard way!) is to have a pack that will let you hunt hard while carrying what you need to secure the meat for the night so you can come back the next day (with help, if possible!), bone out the cooled meat, and carry out what makes sense...

From: BSBD
Date: 12-Jan-18




The 7.5 is fine for backstraps and antlers. I have a 6.5 with a 100oz water bladder secured on top of the waist pack that I've used for 10 years. I keep a freighter at camp for real packing. Most days are used for hunting not packing so I prefer to leave the frame pack at camp in favor of the comfort of just a day pack.

Getting meat off of the bone quickly absolutely doesn't make the meat tough. Faster is better and there is no reason to carry bones. I've completely skinned and boned out large elk with just a 2.5" blade. The less weight to carry the better.

From: Michael Schwister Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 12-Jan-18




On the first trip back I carry the front quarter, bone in, over my shoulder, along with all my hunting gear (catquiver VI.5). Drop gear and front shoulder in camp. Get my old army large alice pack and strip to shorts and tshirt. Go back in and get remaining load. If partner does same you can carry a large adult elk out in two trips.

From: Michael Schwister Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 12-Jan-18




PS, I also carry 5 large game bags at all times. I skin/deboned entire elk (leave bone in front shoulder), place it in game bags and hang the bags up wind of carcass in the shade above bear reach, on limbs too weak to hold said bear if he climbs the tree to get to the meat. I then pick up all my gear and throw the front shoulder, covered in a game bag, over my shoulder and walk out. WHen you get tired it is easy to switch shoulders. You will get some blood on you.

From: Michael Schwister Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 12-Jan-18




PS, I also carry 5 large game bags at all times. I skin/deboned entire elk (leave bone in front shoulder), place it in game bags and hang the bags up wind of carcass in the shade above bear reach, on limbs too weak to hold said bear if he climbs the tree to get to the meat. I then pick up all my gear and throw the front shoulder, covered in a game bag, over my shoulder and walk out. WHen you get tired it is easy to switch shoulders. You will get some blood on you.

From: bluesman
Date: 17-Jan-18




I would not use a cat quiver for carrying meat .. it’s not designed for that . It has plastic and aluminum frame . I love mine for day trips but don’t use it for carrying meat . It will likely break . I would use a frame and a “tube quiver” if you plan to pack meat.





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