Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Wood arrows

Messages posted to thread:
justinspicher 10-Jan-18
GF 10-Jan-18
justinspicher 10-Jan-18
ny yankee 10-Jan-18
reddogge 10-Jan-18
Bob Rowlands 10-Jan-18
Longcruise 10-Jan-18
2 bears 10-Jan-18
Iwander 10-Jan-18
dean 10-Jan-18
SB 10-Jan-18
SB 10-Jan-18
fdp 10-Jan-18
justinspicher 11-Jan-18
Bob Rowlands 11-Jan-18
Stickshooter 11-Jan-18
GF 11-Jan-18
Bob Rowlands 11-Jan-18
From: justinspicher
Date: 10-Jan-18




Is there a way to tell what spine a wood arrow is? I was given several wood arrows, but have no idea what the spine is on them. Shoot fairly well out of my bow, so maybe I shouldn’t really worry about it.

From: GF
Date: 10-Jan-18




It’s called a Spine Tester! And you can’t make good woodies without one. There are DIY options out there, but commercially made ones run about $100 or more.

If you just have a few and they shoot OK, I wouldn’t sweat it...

From: justinspicher
Date: 10-Jan-18




I don’t know why I didn’t think of that. Spine tester, duh.

From: ny yankee
Date: 10-Jan-18




Get one of the Ace spine tester that hangs on a wall. Not real expensive and quite handy to have. Takes all the guesswork out of your arrows.

From: reddogge Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 10-Jan-18




You can drive two nails into the wall 26" apart for the arrow, hang a 2# weight from it and measure the deflection in inches. Then refer to a spine chart to read spine.

From: Bob Rowlands
Date: 10-Jan-18




If you have no intention of starting to make wood arrows, buying a spine tester would be a waste of your money. Do what reddoge suggests. In addition, I would place a deflection graph marked in tenths behind the centerline and simply eyeball the deflection. Set the arrow support nails at eye height so you can get a real accurate view without bending over.

From: Longcruise
Date: 10-Jan-18




If you have a local supplier just take an arrow that flys well to the shop and ask them to spine it and sell you a set that matches.

From: 2 bears
Date: 10-Jan-18




I was going to go where reddogge and Bob went. To even simplify that.No measuring no weighing. Just put one of your known spine arrows on 2 nails hang a weight on the middle of it and then compare the wood arrow. Does it bend more or less? Try a lighter or heavier spined arrow. That is how I sorted arrows when I picked up Pop bottles for change. >>>----> Ken

From: Iwander
Date: 10-Jan-18




I might be the only nut that does this, but lately I just make a bunch of overspined shafts out of board lumber and sand them down until they bareshaft fly just right. works on store bought shafts too.

From: dean
Date: 10-Jan-18




I made a spine tester with wall pegs. I made deflection marks using aluminum shafts of varied sizes, at one time I had them all, and use a stripped fishing rod end for my swiveled marker. I can match my wood arrows to the increments for comparisons. I check every wood shaft before I make an arrow.to check for comparative spines with others that have come before. I find wood shafts from sureuwood and Wapiti to be remarkably consistent. Wood arrows can be a little deceiving, as most bows will accept a rather wide range of wood arrow spines, but I still look for that 'just right' spine.

From: SB
Date: 10-Jan-18

SB's embedded Photo



One that I made with misc scrap pices

From: SB
Date: 10-Jan-18

SB's embedded Photo



Better pic..

From: fdp
Date: 10-Jan-18




I use one like Bob mentioned (I did fancy it up a little) and have for years.

I have a graph that I use that is measured in millimeters (a millimeter is 40 thousandths of an inch) and I just check them, and do the calculation. Works just peachy.

Measure the shaft, spin sand it full length to get it to the spine I want, then taper the ends to match the weight.

From: justinspicher
Date: 11-Jan-18




Some flood ideas, thanks for the insight. I try to build wood arrows, but I’m not very good at it yet. I also get a lot of used arrows that “should” work but don’t so I have to toy with them a bit to get them to fly right.

From: Bob Rowlands
Date: 11-Jan-18




As for used arrows that are too high in spine, simply spin sand them down to what you want. Check the spine on your tool. Remove the fletch. If they are painted or finished, scrape that off with your pocket knife at 90 degrees to the shaft. Chuck the point in your drill. Put a glove on your off hand, grab a piece of paper in the palm of your hand, nest the shaft on the paper, rev the drill and have at it. It's that easy I take mine to the pound using this technique. Even if they are 30 lbs heavy you can take them down this way. Go 120 then 220.

From: Stickshooter
Date: 11-Jan-18




Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't spining wood shafts require the shaft to have the grain facing out and not up and down??

From: GF
Date: 11-Jan-18




Pretty sure that the standard is to weigh with the grain vertical, as opposed to horizontal, and place the index on your nock pointing either straight up or straight down.

Because when you put that arrow on the string, the grain will lie parallel with the shelf, putting its stiffest orientation against the riser... because that’s how they flex at launch.

Spine seems to be a LOT less critical in the vertical plane, so standardizing in the horizontal keeps the variability where it has the least impact on arrow flight.

Or so I understand it.

From: Bob Rowlands
Date: 11-Jan-18




stick, yes the wood grain should be perpendicular to the string. If it is parallel you just might get a split.

I've spined maybe a thousand shafts and orientation of wood grain relative to the 2 pound weight matters little.

What DOES matter in a big way is which way you orient the crown if the arrow isn't perfectly straight. Crown up, spine is greater, to a WHOLE lot greater, and viceversa for crown down. You can get 15 pounds variation with just a little crown. Skinny little wood arrow shafts are VERY crown sensitive in spine. If there's any hop at all straighten the arrow. Or, spin the arrow and repeatedly check, and average the variance.





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