Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Late Season-Cold Feet

Messages posted to thread:
longbowpoe 28-Dec-17
windwalker 28-Dec-17
Orion 28-Dec-17
George D. Stout 28-Dec-17
Wild Bill 28-Dec-17
TrapperKayak 28-Dec-17
Hawkeye 28-Dec-17
Riverwolf 28-Dec-17
RymanCat 28-Dec-17
Shooter 28-Dec-17
Blackstick 28-Dec-17
davesonic444 28-Dec-17
1/2miledrag 28-Dec-17
BATMAN 28-Dec-17
longbowpoe 28-Dec-17
LBshooter 28-Dec-17
indianalongbowshoote 28-Dec-17
windwalker 28-Dec-17
pdk25 28-Dec-17
BlacktailBowhunter 28-Dec-17
Buzz 29-Dec-17
chamookman 29-Dec-17
ground hunter 29-Dec-17
Riverwolf 29-Dec-17
Vanhethof 29-Dec-17
lawdy 29-Dec-17
Pdiddly 29-Dec-17
Wapiti - - M. S. 29-Dec-17
Hh76 29-Dec-17
Pdiddly 29-Dec-17
longbowpoe 29-Dec-17
George D. Stout 29-Dec-17
yellow eye 29-Dec-17
new2trad 30-Dec-17
stony 30-Dec-17
longbowpoe 30-Dec-17
LBshooter 30-Dec-17
ground hunter 30-Dec-17
indianalongbowshoote 30-Dec-17
raghorn 30-Dec-17
The Lost Mohican 30-Dec-17
lawdy 01-Jan-18
pieman 02-Jan-18
two dogs 03-Jan-18
r.grider 03-Jan-18
Bowmaniac 05-Jan-18
windwalker 05-Jan-18
South Farm 05-Jan-18
lawdy 05-Jan-18
windwalker 09-Jan-18
windwalker 09-Jan-18
TrapperKayak 09-Jan-18
White Falcon 09-Jan-18
AustinEvans 10-Jan-18
Bob Rowlands 10-Jan-18
lawdy 10-Jan-18
Cougar 10-Jan-18
Shawn 10-Jan-18
South Farm 11-Jan-18
lawdy 11-Jan-18
From: longbowpoe
Date: 28-Dec-17




As I get older, I find that I struggle to keep my feet and toes warm. Currently, the temps are in the middle teens where I hunt, and 3 hours in the stand is about all I can take before my toes start to get uncomfortable. My current regiment involves using an unscented spray deodorant, liner sock, lacrosse boot sock, and then a pair of old white army issue “Mickey” boots. I have found that hand warmers tend to stop working in my rubber boots, since they do not get enough air flow. Hence, I have stopped using them. I have done some research on different sock materials, heated insoles, and electric heated socks. These can be very expensive, and I hate to take a chance on any of them without hearing from actual hunters like yourself who have tried them. It could be I’m just getting older, circulation getting poor, and that there is nothing more I can do. However, would like to hear what you all do, hoping maybe it can give me a few more ideas to try. Thanks, longbowpoe.

From: windwalker
Date: 28-Dec-17

windwalker's embedded Photo



I can totally relate. I'm 70yrs. old and my feet have always been my weak link so to speak. That is until I heard about Steger Muklucs. I hunted from a ground blind yesterday and the temp was 2 degrees. My feet were just fine. I've been wearing these for about 10yrs. now and cold feet are a non issue.

From: Orion Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 28-Dec-17




I'm on the far side of 70 as well. Circulation just isn't what it used to be. I do about what you do. Can usually make it all day, but my feet and thus the rest of me, gets very cold in the process.

Those mukluks look like a good idea. Might have to give them a try. I do know that anything constricting on the feet reduces circulation. Looks like they would be looser fitting than most other footwear.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 28-Dec-17




It's 12 out today. I don't hunt when it's below 20 degrees anymore. At 20 and above, I just wear waterproof hiking shoes that let your feet breathe. I can keep plenty warm as long as my feet don't sweat, and the toes have room to move. I've tried everything over the years and still find a breathable nylon/leather combo best for me. I don't own a rubber boot anymore except for my Bean Boots and they are worn at temps above 40. A liner sock is good if it isn't cotton, then wool over that.

From: Wild Bill
Date: 28-Dec-17




Arctic Shield boot covers are the ticket for me. I've taken to adding a dry chemical handwarmer packet and the difference is amazing. Now when I get cold because of lack of movement, I only hunt from a treestand, the feet are not the first to feel the chill. I've also started using a belt with a fleece pocket that goes around my chest with the pocket over my kidneys. It also contains a hand warmer packet. Inside my uninsulated outer camo layer I mounted a reflective mylar/bubble panel with safety pins. This works in conjunction with the fleece pocket and contains most of the heat, plus it seriously blocks any heat loss to wind. At temps below freezing I usually last for four hours, then rotate my shoulder,do a few deep knee bends and rotate my feet to stimulate circulation and I can stretch another half hour to forty five minutes. I remove and pack at least two of my outer layers and the Arctic Shield boot covers, before climbing down. Since my hunting gloves are also packed,in my outer layer jacket pocket, I remove another set of gloves I have stored in my front pants pockets, with a hand warmer, to protect my hands as I climb down.

Cold with a wind chill is the worst weather to expose yourself to.Even deer take shelter from cold wind.

From: TrapperKayak
Date: 28-Dec-17




I just got a brand new pair of Muck Wetlands. These boots are the brand and style I have been hunting in for over 25 years, and my feet never get cold in them. Not even when I am standing around. I stood on stand in 5F weather for 5 hours the last week of bow season and my feet were warm the whole time. I wear a pair of thick Cabelas wool boot socks, up to the knees kind. Then wool German Army pants, and no long johns. I tuck the pants into the Mucks. My upper body is clothed in layers, and my hat is just a hunting cap. If below zero, I wear a stocking cap over the ball cap. I used to get cold feet when I was a kid and it was because I tried stuffing too many pairs of socks into boots, even insulated ones. It shut off the circulation. I almost got frostbite from wearing skates way too tight once. Then I made the royal mistake of trying to warm them up in warm water- never do that!!! Huts like hell! Now that I'm 61 almost 62, I never get cold feet, and I only wear my wool liner packs when its below minus 15F. I haven't worn them for over 12 years, and my feet still don't get cold. The ticket is to wear only one pair of socks - good ones.

From: Hawkeye
Date: 28-Dec-17




I wear my Muks ice fishing and they keep my feet warm. I've had mine for about 15 years and have replaced the felt lining once. I'm 79 and know what it is to have cold feet. These work for me even in -20 degree weather and deep snow.

From: Riverwolf
Date: 28-Dec-17




Those Steger Mukluks like windwalkers would be the cats;;;;meow...for "COLD" weather temps and hunting-hiking .

I've Yet to wise up and spend the money for a pair , but I have been in the Steger Mukluks shop in ELY MN....Top notch footwear and company that has set the bar for such footwear for a "LOT" of years !

From: RymanCat
Date: 28-Dec-17




Upsatirs window with big bait pile next to heater.LOL

Kidding I wish to could theres no need for me to go out not in need of meat and get that cold right now trying to play it safe and be smart about it.

I guess I could drive over one since its ok for Frisky to do why not someone else.LOL

I tried toe warmers they didn't work but at least they were better than without. I used hand warmers and burned my hands.Never had that issue before.

I saw zero or 10 below socks was wondering if they worked?

From: Shooter
Date: 28-Dec-17




The old saying to put a hat on to keep your feet warm is good advice.

A good hat that covers your ears and a wool scarf will do wonders to help.

As mentioned above make sure you don't put on more socks than needed. If the boot and the lacing are to tight it will cut off circulation.

From: Blackstick Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 28-Dec-17




My Mickey Mouse boots arn't even working this year. Going to look at those Mukluks.

From: davesonic444
Date: 28-Dec-17




Bigger boots have been my cold feet remedy. I wear 12 in shoes and 14 in hunting boot. I also remove the insole to allow more room. In extreme cold i wear a bp lifetime sock with a thin poly sock and electric toe warmers i got off amazon for 24.00 that take batteries. -7 degrees for 4 hrs with that rig. When i buy boots i take my hunting socks and try on the boot. If i can wiggle my toes freely with them in the boot i will purchase the boot. Buy the way if the toe warmers aren't getting warm your boot is too tight. I am in my 60's and used to smoke, so i can relate to cold feet.

From: 1/2miledrag
Date: 28-Dec-17




It was -14 this morning while ice fishing; feet stayed warm. Lacrosse pack boots, at least one size larger, with wool socks. They are pricey, around $170 but worth every penny. Also not good for walking distances, stalking etc, but if stand hunting they're the ticket for me.

From: BATMAN Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 28-Dec-17




These are great ideas! Hope that SOMEBODY can benefit from them? BTTT!

From: longbowpoe
Date: 28-Dec-17




Thanks for the replies. I have decided that I might try the Mukluks. They are pricey, but if they work it will be worth the price.

From: LBshooter
Date: 28-Dec-17




Was out today in five degrees, and my 400 gram boots with artic shield boot covers with a body rubber banded to the top of my boot at the toes did the job.i too have been eyeing some mukluks and I think next year I'll be wearing them,.

From: indianalongbowshoote
Date: 28-Dec-17




I bought a pair of heated socks from the warming store and they have 3 heat settings and hunted in 19 deg. today and 9 deg. today for 3.5 hrs and on med setting they kept my feet nice and toasty.. they are pricey 134.00 but got tired of my feet freezing even with a 198.00 pair of Muck Artic Pro boots/wool socks, these solved the problem so if they last well worth the money..on med heat they last 4-6 hrs, low 8-10, and high 4hrs give or take.

From: windwalker
Date: 28-Dec-17




If you go with the Steger's, buy them a whole size larger than your regular size. I normally wear a size 12 but my mukluks are size 13. Also, buy them in double wide.The secret to their warmth is their ability to breath and allow blood flow to your feet.

From: pdk25
Date: 28-Dec-17




They don't make them anymore, but for temps above 15 degrees, I wear a pair of uninsulated or lightly insulated cordura or leather boots and use a pair of hotmocs with handwarmer.pockets. if more people knew about these, the company never would have gone out of business.

From: BlacktailBowhunter
Date: 28-Dec-17




High 20’s is as cold as it gets here and I use the chemical hand warmers in my Danner boots. I put 1 under my toes and another between my Achilles heal and ankle bone.

I sit stands primarily and thins Year I started covering my legs with my carhart rain coat that I wrapped around my legs. It make a huge difference compared to having my legs exposed. I wear jeans under insulated bibs. I put hand warmers down the front of my shirt just over the base layer and in my pockets as well.

After the morning hunt I place the hand warmers in a plastic bag and it stops the chemicals from working, so I’m able to use them for the evening hunt as well.

Needless to say I don’t like getting cold.

From: Buzz
Date: 29-Dec-17

Buzz's embedded Photo



My niece was showing off her new Sorels, two pair, tonight.

Canadian company been around since before I was born.

https://www.sorelfootwear.ca/en/men-boots-snow/

From: chamookman
Date: 29-Dec-17




Have a pair of Steggars for 15 years now - best cold weather boot going period ! Bob

From: ground hunter
Date: 29-Dec-17




I am 68, my feet do not get cold much, guess I am lucky but I am in N Wis and the UP so maybe I am use to it,,,,,,

cutting country for the day, in cold weather,,,, under 15 degrees I like my 1200 gram Rockys, have had them for 10 years and can not wear them out, never had an eyelet brake or anything,,,,,, Of course they are not made anymore.......

I use mickey mouse boots only when I am on the ice, fishing, to insulate my feet, from the dampness of the water /ice

those mucklluaks look pretty awesome

From: Riverwolf
Date: 29-Dec-17




As added above ....get at least 1 size larger/wider ...maybe two ? With compression is loss of insulation = cold feet .

Wear good quality wool socks , and properly sized boots for such to get the most out of your winter wear boot/sock combination .

A call to Steger Mukluks of Ely Mn with your actual foot size etc...will get you in the right direction I recon in the proper sizing department .....You can check them out on line also...

From: Vanhethof
Date: 29-Dec-17




Every place I hunt in Michigan involves crossing some type of wetland - creeks, swamps, muck, etc. I've looked at purchasing Steger mukluks but, unless things have changed, always backed off due to their non-waterproof construction. For those of you who have them, what effective measures have you used to increase their water resistance?

From: lawdy
Date: 29-Dec-17




I wear bean boots with thinsulate for tracking or stillhunting. When I sit, I use down-filled boot blankets that Bean used to sell. They compress in a little bag the size of a tennis ball. They are crazy warm. However, they are getting beat and I can't get them anymore, so thanks to this thread, I have an alternate choice. I know where my income tax rebate is going for my wife and myself. At only 3 pounds per pair, I will try carrying them in a daypack if it is wet and put them on if I decide to sit before dark.

From: Pdiddly
Date: 29-Dec-17




Sorel Glacier boots is what I have worn for years when sitting in December in Northern Ontario...-8 to -20 Celsius is the norm, plus wind chill. Also wore them on snow machines going ice fishing...-25 and we would run for an hour getting to spots. Feet are never, ever cold and just with a sock liner and wool socks. They had a hi-tec liner, insole and boot construction. Not sure if they are still made. I will check.

From: Wapiti - - M. S. Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 29-Dec-17




I wear and have used boot blankets before over lighter and heavy hunting boots.Depending on the weather conditions and the type of hunting that I was doing.They have always kept my feet warm I would say that they work the best for me when having to sit long hours in a stand when it was bitter cold.The down side of them was that they were a little to bulky. You really had to pay attention to moving your feet when getting set up to take a shot.

From: Hh76
Date: 29-Dec-17




I think I just have poor circulation, but I never found a boot and sock combo that kept my feet warm I used to carry my super insulated ice fishing in, change into dry socks, and an hour later I would have cold feet. I tried hand or toe warmers in the boots, but they'd get starved of air and cool off, and they were uncomfortable. Even in fairly warm conditions.

What finally started working is placing a hand warmer ON TOP of my boot toe, not inside, and wrapping my boots in something. Now, I where what ever boot is most comfortable for walking, and throw on my boot covers when I want to sit.

From: Pdiddly
Date: 29-Dec-17




Yep...they still have Glaciers...now called the Glacier XT. Also have an even warmer boot called the Intrepid Explorer but they look like overkill. They will keep you warm. One thing I would never depend on is anything electric or chemical to keep me warm. If you run into trouble and have to spend a night out or are incapacitated you would be hooped. Also noticed some people wearing cotton layers on their body...a waste of a layer if wool can be worn...if your body and legs are warm your feet will be too.

From: longbowpoe
Date: 29-Dec-17




This has been an immensely helpful thread. A lot of good information based on a lot of years of experience. Thank you!

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 29-Dec-17




A lot of this depends on whether you sit all day (yikes), or are moving as much as sitting. Completely different needs.

From: yellow eye
Date: 29-Dec-17




Keep your feet warmer by wearing better insulation on your legs. Blood flows through your legs to get to your feet. Less nerve endings in your legs so you don't feel the cold and there is many more nerves in your feet so you feel the cold more. Heavy pants, double long underwear, sweatpants, if you do a lot of walking this combo will make you sweat

From: new2trad
Date: 30-Dec-17




There are a ton of great ideas from many experienced hunters on this thread and I'll throw my 2 cents in for what it's worth. I noticed nobody has mentioned the use of a boot dryer at all. I've found that placing your boots on one of these dryers overnight makes a huge difference in keeping feet warm the next morning regardless of the type of boot. It seems to me that no matter what type of boot you're wearing...if they're damp from wearing the day before, your feet are going to get cold much sooner. Also, while they are a little on the expensive side...those heated insoles do work wonders. The nice thing about those is that you can leave them turned off while walking to your stand so your feet don't start sweating, and wait for a while once you're on stand to turn them on...extending your time in stand just that much longer.

From: stony
Date: 30-Dec-17




I agree with boot dryer use, damp boots are cold boots. Several years ago I bought a pair of Bass Pro's Redhead lifetime socks($9.95) and have never used any other sock since for cold weather. Sometimes I will add a pair of wicking socks but most times don't need them. I have tried almost every kind of socks during my 74 years such as Merino wool, Alpaca wool, electric socks, hot feet etc. and now I have a drawer full of socks used as rags. The great part about the Redhead socks is that they are replaced FREE OF CHARGE if they fail, rip or just wear out. My son, grandkids and friends all use them with any kinds of boots. Definitely worth a try and a lot cheaper than new boots.

From: longbowpoe
Date: 30-Dec-17




I’m glad someone mentioned the Alpaca socks, cause I have seriously looked at those. Was curious if they are as good as many of the reviews claim. Again, as many on this site have mentioned, there is a big difference between working or hiking in cold weather, compared to sitting in a stand without moving for several hours. That’s why, instead of dumping $30 a pair on Alpaca socks or $150 on heated insoles, etc, I figured I would reach out to people who have been there...done that. I have much more confidence in what the folks here have to say.

From: LBshooter
Date: 30-Dec-17




I have alpaca socks and they are good, but feet still get cold if you don't have the right boots. Talked with Peggy t the mukluk store and the cammuks are no problem as far as getting wet. The upper gaiter is not waterproof but the bottom show part is.

From: ground hunter
Date: 30-Dec-17




I second the redhead lifetime sock, and the alpaca sock is the most over priced sock I have seen

From: indianalongbowshoote
Date: 30-Dec-17




I will say this the heated socks I posted about further up page were worth the money even though pricey, have hunted with them the last 3 days in 9 deg, 19 deg and this morning in 17 deg with 20 mph winds and my feet were toasty warm to hot depending what I had them set on..way easier to sit still if your toes are not aching from the cold so I look at it as money well spent.

From: raghorn
Date: 30-Dec-17




Over sized boots then add a 1/2" wool felt innersole.Wool socks. Sit with your toes pointing up and the foot resting on the heel- takes pressure off the toes and leaves room for an air space around the toes, plus the heat rises toward toes.Wiggle toes

From: The Lost Mohican
Date: 30-Dec-17




Great advice here! Great input by all. TLM

From: lawdy
Date: 01-Jan-18




I have spent some time gettibg all the info I can get on Steger mukluk, specifically, Cammuks. I snowshoe all winter chasing hounds and wonder if anyone has used that mukluk and how they worked out.

From: pieman
Date: 02-Jan-18




Windwalker, I took your advice and have a pair of Mukluks on the way. Hope they make the last three weeks of the season more ccomfortable.

From: two dogs
Date: 03-Jan-18




Anyone wearing a heater bodysuit have any issues with cold feet?

From: r.grider
Date: 03-Jan-18




if i wear insulated boots I only get sweaty feet walking in, and then I really am in trouble. My solution is boot blankets after I get settled in. A hot hands pack in each one keeps my toes toasty !

From: Bowmaniac
Date: 05-Jan-18




Wiggy's makes socks with lamilite insulation, these have worked the best for me!!

From: windwalker
Date: 05-Jan-18

windwalker's embedded Photo



Robert. I wear my mukluks for snowshoeing frequently. I have the Artics. They are perfect for snowshoe use because of their flexibility. I wear Iverson Alaskan snowshoes because of the incredible depth of snow we get in the West Mi. snow belt. It is a winning combination.If you look closely you will see them leaning against my cabin.

From: South Farm
Date: 05-Jan-18




Another Stegar Mukluk fan here! Nothing comes close!

From: lawdy
Date: 05-Jan-18




Ron, I use rubber bindings. They look like a triangle with a hole in them. I am on snowshoes a lot. How durable do you think mukluks are as far as wearing around a harness? I am interested in either the arctics or Camuks which have a rubberized coating on the foot. Thanks for answering, Bob

From: windwalker
Date: 09-Jan-18

windwalker's embedded Photo



Put the Steger's through their paces last week.-8deg. and I was just fine.

From: windwalker
Date: 09-Jan-18




To answer your question, Robert, mine have held up fine with my bindings. Mine are all leather.

From: TrapperKayak
Date: 09-Jan-18




Buzz, I had those same Sorels way back when, then got Schnees and they are way better, but not cheap. Neither are Sorels though. Just got my wife a pair of the gray ones for Christmas. I'd have gotten her Schnees if we were in Bozeman...when I should say.

From: White Falcon
Date: 09-Jan-18




Red Head 1200 gr.insulation. works for me in the low teens.

From: AustinEvans
Date: 10-Jan-18




Can't beat Steger Mukluks. Warmest boot out there, yet flexible, and not bulky. Also lighter than pac boots.

From: Bob Rowlands
Date: 10-Jan-18




Everybody wore Sorels when we lived in Jackson Wyo back in the late 70s early 80s. Everyone. The temps there were frequently below freezing and got below zero too often. With Sorels you could be out all day, orking and goofing around. I'd didn't sit much back then. lol I got a couple extra pair of liners for mine. Wore them every day for a few months every winter. Good stuff.

From: lawdy
Date: 10-Jan-18

lawdy's embedded Photo



I am ordering the Steger Camuks. If they work out well I will get a pair for my wife. You guys convinced me. I was hiking out on snowshoes wearing Muck boots in 3-4 feet of soft snow and thought my 71 yearold legs were going to fall off. There is no base to this stuff and I have 2 deer yards to survey next week. My male 13" beagle ran a hare for almost 2 hours with just the top of his head showing. I let the hare go by me and grabbed Ziggy. Long walk out. Ziggy is beat.

From: Cougar Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 10-Jan-18




From: Shawn
Date: 10-Jan-18




The large body heat packs and put one over your heart close to the skin say over a couple thin layers and one over each kidney. You will be amazed at how much that warm blood helps keep ya warm. Next a pair of Sorrel extreme Expedition boots or a air of Baffin impact boots, rated to 148 below. Wear good socks and make sure the boot is a tad loose fitting. My feet never get cold and I hunted this year in air temps of -3 and wind chills 25 below! Shawn

From: South Farm
Date: 11-Jan-18




Love that beagle pic Lawdy! Had me one named Pearl, best dang friend I ever had!

From: lawdy
Date: 11-Jan-18




Thanks South Farm, he is a hare hunting machine. He started his first hare at 4 months and hung onto it for 4 hours. If he is on a hare he will not come when called. You have to intercept and catch him.





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