Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Weight

Messages posted to thread:
Bowguy 12-Oct-17
deerhunt51 12-Oct-17
grizz 12-Oct-17
Tom McCool 12-Oct-17
Cameron Root 12-Oct-17
Draven 12-Oct-17
Draven 12-Oct-17
GF 13-Oct-17
2 bears 13-Oct-17
Draven 13-Oct-17
Draven 13-Oct-17
Draven 13-Oct-17
MStyles 13-Oct-17
Bowguy 13-Oct-17
Oly 13-Oct-17
Bowmania 13-Oct-17
buster v davenport 13-Oct-17
Shawn 13-Oct-17
PEARL DRUMS 13-Oct-17
jk 13-Oct-17
badger 13-Oct-17
Cameron Root 13-Oct-17
Draven 13-Oct-17
fdp 13-Oct-17
Draven 13-Oct-17
2 bears 14-Oct-17
Draven 14-Oct-17
westrayer 14-Oct-17
Draven 14-Oct-17
Draven 14-Oct-17
From: Bowguy
Date: 12-Oct-17




As some know I am recovering from a problem. Made me weaker and a bit uncoordinated for a bit. As I sat home I pondered shooting wondering if I would this year. I acquired a 42 lb psa and relearned to shoot that. Normally I shoot once a day in the 63lb range. Starting shooting a fatal styk at 47, to make a long story short I'm now mid 50s with some trouble but I can shoot the bow. I can even pull back a 63 pounder back beyond my anchor point. Just did it to check as I'm no young guy but the meat head hasn't left I guess. I posted about shooting the Toelke whip. It's only 45. It's a bit slower than some of my recurves but it's absolutely a joy to shoot. In fact I'm using archery to regain lost hand/eye coordination and strength but I keep grabbing the whip at 45. I'm home all the time right now and can shoot whenever. Something to be said for being able to shoot 5-6X a day for as long as I want without my shoulders complaining. It's actually really enjoyable again. For those who may be contemplating a weight jump up, I'd say enjoy more of the flight of an arrow, and shoot more, by pulling less.

From: deerhunt51
Date: 12-Oct-17




Glad you are shooting. IMHO 45# and a 450-500 grain arrow is plenty of bow for almost all North American game. Accuracy and woodsman ship trump pounds pulled.

From: grizz
Date: 12-Oct-17




If you keep reaching for the 45, then stick to it. I'm going down in poundage myself and am using my 45 because I keep reaching for it. Plus, I'm more accurate with it and more confident that after 2/3 hours on a stand in the cold I can still handle the bow with no problem. It's a very effective weapon.

From: Tom McCool
Date: 12-Oct-17




I always shot bows in the 40 pound range even though I can handle 65# no problem.

Many advantages with my slower lighter bows. Example, If a deer tries to "duck the string"...the arrow takes longer to get there and hits him when he stands back up!! LOL!

You coments bowguy about "enjoying and shooting again" is all that matters. More Blessings to you sir!

From: Cameron Root
Date: 12-Oct-17




I mainly shoot a heavier bow and enjoy doing so. When I shoot my lighter bows wow what a difference . But I keep grabbing the heavy stuff. If you keep grabbing certain bow j am not so sure it's the weight. I think you just like what your shooting. Rooty

From: Draven
Date: 12-Oct-17




A heavier bow will teach you to not waste your time flinging arrows and will force you to take the training seriously if you really want to become accurate with it - otherwise you will pay the price. There is not right and wrong, shoot what you like.

From: Draven
Date: 12-Oct-17




PS I shoot #50, #55 and #74 with the same joy. #74 is the single bow I consider in "heavy bow" category.

From: GF
Date: 13-Oct-17




Interesting take, Draven!

For over 25 years, I've been able to shoot a #55@28" all day long, so to speak....

Makes me wonder what I could do with higher pounds on a dozen shots a day....

From: 2 bears
Date: 13-Oct-17




Heavier bow with less practice? The usual result is less accuracy. Think about how many arrows OLY shooters loose ever day. There are very few that shoot as many arrows or have their accuracy. I am not against heavy bows. Up to a point they allow a little bit more room for error but as we all know broad head placement is the key. Shoot as heavy as you can practice enough with to maintain accuracy. 45 pounds has always been deadly enough for me. With a well tuned shaft, 3" feathers and a good stout, cut on contact broad head,it has yielded more deadly pass through's than not.Admitted 25 yards is my longest shot. Most have been inside 15 but that is archery. I am sure if most of my hunting was on western open country I would look at it differently.>>>----> Ken

From: Draven
Date: 13-Oct-17




Gentlemen, a person who knows how to shoot will need around 100-150 arrows per session of training to keep ithe form and experiment things, not 300 slings. And a person who’s accurate with a #55 will be accurate with #70 if he can handle the bow. That’s my experience. Your millage may vary.

From: Draven
Date: 13-Oct-17




PS You don’t shoot 100 arrows with the 70 first time you get it. But in a month you will if you train diligently. I don’t know somebody who started with 55 to be capable to shoot 100 arrows first time he got it. It’s the same thing with any poundage, it’s a matter of: I want or not to shoot that thing.

From: Draven
Date: 13-Oct-17




GF Imagine what you can do with 100 shots instead 12

From: MStyles
Date: 13-Oct-17




I like shooting the lower draw weights, but because I don’t have to work to shoot it, I lose my focus after about 40 arrows, basically I become bored. I go for a heavier draw weight bc it forces me to focus on the target, and my crummy form. Maybe I like the challenge, I really can’t explain it.

From: Bowguy Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 13-Oct-17




It's not a weight thing. Years ago I shot 90 than 75lb bows. Who cares though. I've power lifted my whole life, only now am I struggling because of the surgeries and not being able to be physical. It'd be hard to shoot even the 63 I was shooting in June. Yea I shot it, yea I was accurate, yea had pass throughs, but I couldn't shoot for hours each day like I do now. I have targets all over my yard, I shoot from the porch, the powerline up behind the house down to the yard for height shots. The yard is 112 yards long so I can practice long shots. I have a couple 3D deer, some multi spot targets, some a black target with 1 white spot. Some bags, plus I could just judo point leaves. To keep concentration high I shoot 1 arrow from every spot. Pull the arrow and shoot again another way. In fact I don't even carry a quiver, it's only 1 arrow. Maybe with limited time I'd shoot different but like I posted I personally like watching an arrow spin down range and hit a mark. I've been at this 47 years and I still fist pump a perfect shot. Just couldn't shoot as much with more weight even though I can handle it. I'd shoot less and therefore have less fun. I do understand everyone is different. Now for those with bad form, as an instructor we'd tell ya to lower weight anyway, not shoot heavier or less. Lots of other methods too but you get what I'm saying I hope. My way isn't the only way either so don't mistake the post please

From: Oly
Date: 13-Oct-17




2 bears... did u just compliment me or some other OLY :)

I agree with the OP that shooting a draw weight that is comfortable will help a shooter work on form & accuracy, which is difficult if you are over bowed. I typically try to shoot several days a week, all year long... some sessions may be 15 minutes while others could be 2-3 hours. My current bows all range from 48 - 60 lbs, all very comfortable to shoot for me and I enjoy shooting everyone of them, but that 48 pounder is absolute butter and plenty fast.

From: Bowmania Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 13-Oct-17




I would ask you what age do you want to shoot until? Keep shooting 63 pound and you probably won't make it. Unless you after the two big NA bears there's no reason to shoot 63.

I did it. Sixty eight for 20 years and the last couple years shooting a moose and big bull elk with 50. But the 68 did it's damage. I may get to the end of this whitetail season with 39 pounds? It's not looking good.

Bowmania

From: buster v davenport
Date: 13-Oct-17




From: Shawn
Date: 13-Oct-17




Listen I shoot 42-46#s and shoot less then 8gpp of draw weight. I have killed 2 deer with my recurve this year and it has blown right through both of them. One was a big 2.5 year old. My point is you do not need to shoot high poundage or even a heavy arrow when shooting low poundage. The most important thing is to put it where it is supposed to go. If you can do that with a light bow and a very sharp broadhead the deer will be just as dead as shot with a howitzer! Dead is Dead. Shawn

From: PEARL DRUMS
Date: 13-Oct-17




I missed my target last night at 17 yards. I was shooting my 47# osage straight bow pulled 28". It blew right through 5/8 MDF with a whipped out field point. You can those heavy bows, I'll keep my healthy shoulders so I can shoot until I'm dead'ish :)

From: jk
Date: 13-Oct-17




I'm 75...don't hunt, too much hassle here...would hunt if I lived around lots of deer or other edible vermin. I enjoy 60# and have for 15 years. Actually more comfortable with that weight now at 75 than when I was 70. Used to have pains but not since I started proper form.

From: badger
Date: 13-Oct-17




Something I have continued to struggle with for decades is not engaging my back muscles. After starting back shooting from a long lay off the only muscles that are sore or pumped up after a session are my upper shoulder and neck muscles, nothing n my back.

From: Cameron Root
Date: 13-Oct-17




I am going to shoot what I want. I suggest everybody do the same. I am certainly not going to be scolded by any one for what I shoot. Rooty

From: Draven
Date: 13-Oct-17




There is one way to make the back muscles engaged without thinking. Have them engaged due to your form. Align your elbow with the arrow and where the 1st thumb knuckle is on your face, that's your 1st anchor. For 99.99% of the persons the alignment happens when the thumb knuckle is behind the jaw, right under the ear lobe. When you do that, the finger tips are touching the corner of the mouth. Decide for one of them and this is your 2nd anchor. 1st anchor is responsible with your draw length - it's the same every time because is a solid anchor - and with your back muscles engaged 2nd anchor is responsible with the elevation of the end of the arrow which relates to distance of flight and in the end, accuracy

From: fdp
Date: 13-Oct-17




One reason you aren't getting back muscles engaged badger is you are probably starting your draw with your hands too high. If you start the draw with your hands at shoulder level or JUST slightly higher, you have to use your back more. Yeah, I know folks are going to dispute that but all you have to do is try it for yourself. Or, take an exercise band and hold it like a bow, and pull it. See which muscles you feel engaged as you go from pulling at waist level, up to shoulder level, and then higher up your face. Many people can't anchor at the corner of their mouth and get their back muscles engaged early in the draw. Me for one.

Then there is the whole "anchoring" thing. That's a terrible description of what we should be doing when we draw a bow. You should have some type of physical feedback in your shooting sequence that requires to continue to feel the sensation of pulling your bow until the arrow is gone. You don't touch the reference point on your face or where ever it may be, and then hold the string. You have to keep having that pulling sensation. As soon as that sensation is gone, you have lost your back muscles and back tension, and the weight of the bow has shifted to your shoulders and arms. Now as for draw weight, the majority of folks shooting recurves and longbows would be well served to decrease their draw weight 10lbs, and increasing their draw length 2". It would save wear and tear on their bodies, and provide the same or better performance they are getting with the heavier bow.

From: Draven
Date: 13-Oct-17




PS I missed the punch line there. When the elbow is aligned with the arrow, the back is engaged due to natural way the bones and muscles are working.

From: 2 bears
Date: 14-Oct-17




OLY eh would you believe both? :^) >>>----> Ken

From: Draven
Date: 14-Oct-17




Just one.

From: westrayer
Date: 14-Oct-17




I am waiting on new, heavier limbs. Nothing wrong with the 48# set now shooting but I like shooting heavier. SO anxiously awaiting the set of 54#. I won't be able to shoot a lot with them, especially at first. But I do plan on hunting with them yet this year.

From: Draven
Date: 14-Oct-17




Viper

Some scientific researches indicate that attention span to the humans is 8 seconds. The tricky part is from where the attention is "counted" when shooting a bow. If the archer takes 6 seconds to get to the anchor without taking eyes from the target, he is left with 2 seconds of good focus - it matches the korean theory.

From: Draven
Date: 14-Oct-17




Hmmm, the above was not supposed to be here.





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