Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


Need help identifying a tree

Messages posted to thread:
duvall 18-May-17
duvall 18-May-17
Fuzzy 18-May-17
Fuzzy 18-May-17
Fuzzy 18-May-17
Woods Walker 18-May-17
duvall 18-May-17
Fuzzy 18-May-17
duvall 18-May-17
Fuzzy 18-May-17
Fuzzy 18-May-17
White Falcon 18-May-17
Skeets 18-May-17
brianbfree 18-May-17
Skeets 18-May-17
BOX CALL 18-May-17
arrowwood 18-May-17
Mountain Man 18-May-17
2 bears 18-May-17
bearfootin 18-May-17
George D. Stout 18-May-17
George D. Stout 18-May-17
Woods Walker 18-May-17
Skeets 18-May-17
Fats 18-May-17
Fats 18-May-17
Fats 18-May-17
zonic 18-May-17
zonic 18-May-17
Woods Walker 18-May-17
Drewster 18-May-17
duvall 18-May-17
Schleprock 18-May-17
Woods Walker 18-May-17
arrowwood 18-May-17
DarrinG 18-May-17
Jim Davis 18-May-17
Drewster 18-May-17
Woods Walker 18-May-17
Woods Walker 18-May-17
fdp 18-May-17
arrowwood 18-May-17
Woods Walker 19-May-17
Newhunter 19-May-17
Newhunter 19-May-17
Liquid Amber 19-May-17
Woods Walker 19-May-17
old fudd 19-May-17
George D. Stout 19-May-17
limbwalker 19-May-17
Fuzzy 19-May-17
zonic 19-May-17
George D. Stout 19-May-17
Bob W. 19-May-17
Woods Walker 19-May-17
WV Mountaineer 19-May-17
Slayer NE 20-May-17
Newhunter 20-May-17
duvall 20-May-17
SJR Bows 20-May-17
Newhunter 20-May-17
Philbow 20-May-17
Earl Mason 20-May-17
From: duvall Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 18-May-17

duvall's embedded Photo



Found a grove of these trees and for the life of me can't identify these. Compound palmately leaves and rough bark.

From: duvall Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 18-May-17

duvall's embedded Photo



From: Fuzzy
Date: 18-May-17




those look like simple leaves that originate from a terminal twig smooth margins? how large are the leaves? I'm thinking cucumbertree

From: Fuzzy
Date: 18-May-17

Fuzzy's embedded Photo



leaves of Black Gum (Nyssa sylvatica)

From: Fuzzy
Date: 18-May-17




actually looking at the bark...maybe black gum??

From: Woods Walker
Date: 18-May-17




Looks like ash, bark too.

www.google.com/search? q=ash+tree+leaves&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS724US724&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source= univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjvkdno- vnTAhWnhlQKHXxZDGIQsAQILA&biw=875&bih=388&dpr=1.56#imgrc=dJ2fUCyG wtQEnM:

From: duvall Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 18-May-17




Checked that out and I don't think that's what it is

From: Fuzzy
Date: 18-May-17

Fuzzy's embedded Photo



bark of black gum

From: duvall Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 18-May-17




Someone suggested black gum but I don't think it's that either. There are only 4 leaflets per bunch

From: Fuzzy
Date: 18-May-17




black gum fruits are smallish (blueberry sized) fleshy oval drupes with a large central seed, dark purple to almost black.... the twigs are very tough and flexible, almost impossible to snap...

From: Fuzzy
Date: 18-May-17




gum trees have a tendency to become hollow on older, larger trees.

From: White Falcon
Date: 18-May-17




Mulberry?

From: Skeets
Date: 18-May-17




Not ash, not mulberry. I'm not familiar with Black Gum. I have to look up Basswood.

From: brianbfree
Date: 18-May-17




It looks to be a tall tree

From: Skeets
Date: 18-May-17




Nope. Not Basswood either.

From: BOX CALL
Date: 18-May-17




Bet an old baker would slide down it,lol

From: arrowwood
Date: 18-May-17




Not much to go by there, but look at Magnolia acuminata, a.k.a. cucumber tree.

I could believe Black gum too, maybe. It almost always grows perfectly straight

From: Mountain Man
Date: 18-May-17




Black gum But it does look little ashes ; )

From: 2 bears
Date: 18-May-17




The leaves and bark do look like a huge Mullbery in the back yard. How ever I don't see any cluster of 4 to 5 leaves on the end of a stem like that. Check again in a couple of weeks and see if it starts putting on berys.>>>----> Ken

From: bearfootin Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 18-May-17




Maybe Elm........ the bark looks like it and the leaves too, not sure about 4 leafs in a bunch tho.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 18-May-17

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



It looks nothing like white ash, that's what we have growing around here...talking the bark structure.

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 18-May-17




If it is cucumber, and it my be since the bark is similar, there will likely be fruit under it...dried up from last year.

From: Woods Walker
Date: 18-May-17




Elms have simple (not compound) leaves. The 4 leaflets rule out ash too I guess.

From: Skeets
Date: 18-May-17




White ash has 7 leaves on a stem. Had to did out my 1967 leaf collection from 9th grade. It does look like Cucumber Magnolia except I only have 1 leaf. Not a cluster of 4.

From: Fats
Date: 18-May-17




I don't know but may be hickory

From: Fats
Date: 18-May-17




I don't know but may be hickory

From: Fats
Date: 18-May-17




I don't know but may be hickory

From: zonic
Date: 18-May-17




Tulip trees - my guess.

From: zonic
Date: 18-May-17




Or Elm.

From: Woods Walker
Date: 18-May-17




Not Tulip. Those leaves are unmistakable. And Elms don't have compound leaves.

I don't recall any compound leaves with only 4 leaflets. Ya got me!

Maybe post some more pics??

From: Drewster
Date: 18-May-17




Duvall, where is this tree located.....state, county?

From: duvall Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 18-May-17




I checked all those and the leaf structure is what is throwing everything out the window. They are alternate compound palmately leaf cluster with 4 leaflets. I've looked through all the sugestions here and can't get a match. Closest leaf pattern I've found is buckeye or horsechestnut but the bark doesnt match those. It's driving me nuts

From: Schleprock
Date: 18-May-17




http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/cs/groups/public/documents/document/ dcnr_002216.pdf

From: Woods Walker
Date: 18-May-17




Take a sample leaf to your local farm bureau and ask them.

And the let us know here!!!

From: arrowwood
Date: 18-May-17




Not palmately compound; whorled, maybe. I still think it's cucumber or black gum - leaves < 5" would be black gum, 5" and larger would be cucumber magnolia.

From: DarrinG
Date: 18-May-17




Sure looks like a black gum to me.

From: Jim Davis
Date: 18-May-17




In my experience, don't bother to take it to a forester, they won't know, but will call it something like red chestnut (of which there is no such common name and he won't say a scientific name).

Had a forester look at my woods here in Kentucky. I asked him what kind of hickory a certain tree was. "Could be a smooth-bark or a red hickory," he said--neither of which is in any tree book I have seen.

Need to see more of a branch with its leaves it would really help to see the fruit or even a blossom, if its too early for fruit.

From: Drewster
Date: 18-May-17




Yeah, you might try the US Forest Service lab too.

From: Woods Walker
Date: 18-May-17




Bad link Schleprock.

From: Woods Walker
Date: 18-May-17




duvall: Looking at your pic again, in the lower center of the pic with the sky as the background, is that a white flower? It also looks like there's some in other parts of the picture but they're blurred maybe?? Hard to tell.

From: fdp
Date: 18-May-17




It's a Black Gum tree is my guess. At least that's what the bark and leaves say to me.

From: arrowwood
Date: 18-May-17




Remove the space before the second "dcnr" in Schleprock's link - here's a link to the key his link mentions, but it might not come out right either:

http://extension.psu.edu/4-h/leaders/resources/publications/d0410e-summer-key-for-pennsylvania-trees.pdf

Red hickory is Carya ovata, kind of rare, but it's in all my books

I wonder if people post archery questions in tree forums? Some of the guesses here are way out there...

From: Woods Walker
Date: 19-May-17




To the top....I really want to know what this is!

From: Newhunter
Date: 19-May-17




http://www.cookforest.com/articles/trees/black-gum.cfm

From: Newhunter
Date: 19-May-17




The Dupont family brought many European trees to US. If you are living in the southeast corner of Pennsylvania it can be one of this. Look on the ground if you find any seed or nuts.

From: Liquid Amber Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 19-May-17




I've been retired now two years so you guys are going to have to figure it out on your own. :) Identifying trees from leaf and bark closeups sometimes can be difficult and these photos provided aren't very good.

Many trees can be identified simply from their form and providing a photo of the entire tree can be most helpful. Also, poke around in the duff under them to look for remnants of mast or other clues. If the trees were/are black gum and you were around them during the fall, you should have already identified them by their early fall color.

From: Woods Walker
Date: 19-May-17




Black Gum has simple leaves. The tree in question has a compound leaf with 4 leaflets.

From: old fudd
Date: 19-May-17




the bark looks like the 30 foot black walnut in my back yard,

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 19-May-17

George D. Stout's embedded Photo



Cucumber.

From: limbwalker
Date: 19-May-17




I'm not sure that's a compound leaf with 4 leaflets. I think those are 4 simple leaves originating from the same node. Where 'bouts is this tree?

From: Fuzzy
Date: 19-May-17




I think the compound leaf thing is what's throwing everyone off. Those are not compound leaves, they are simple leaves growing from a central point.

From: zonic
Date: 19-May-17




https://en.wi kipedia.org/wiki/Elm#/media/File:Ulmus_glabra.jpg

From: George D. Stout Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 19-May-17




Elm has serrated leaves.

From: Bob W.
Date: 19-May-17




It's not walnut or mullberry.

From: Woods Walker
Date: 19-May-17




DEFINITELY not them. I have them growing on my place and can tell them by smell!

From: WV Mountaineer
Date: 19-May-17




It's a Black Gum. You can take that to the bank. If not, call WVU and tell them my forestry degree isn't worth much. LOL Seriously, there isn't much to go on there and, anyone could be wrong by just looking at the leaves and the bark on a lot of species. Even foresters as there is so much variation in the same species from site index's of a general area. Much less region to region. However, the indicator I'm using from what I see is the way the twigs and limbs grow nearly perpendicular to their origin In other words, look for the way the twigs come off at nearly a perfect 90 degree angle from the branch. God Bless

From: Slayer NE Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 20-May-17




Don't know what a black gum looks like, but it absolutely isn't an elm, ash, hickory, or walnut.

From: Newhunter
Date: 20-May-17




I am from a different continent trying to learn the names of the trees over here. If we look at the flower on the first photo, low in the middle, it looks like a black gum flower and all the rest look like black gum.

From: duvall Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 20-May-17




Well I'm no forester so this might not matter at all but all the pics I've seen of black gum they have 5 leaflets...these trees have 4...again dont know if that makes a difference

From: SJR Bows Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 20-May-17




It is a black gum.

From: Newhunter
Date: 20-May-17




Make more photos.

From: Philbow Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 20-May-17




How about tupelo, Nyssa aquatica?

From: Earl Mason
Date: 20-May-17




It's a white gum guys.





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