Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


laminating oven???? how to make one

Messages posted to thread:
hawkeye Oh 13-Apr-11
Dick Wightman 13-Apr-11
PaPa Doc 13-Apr-11
Hal9000 13-Apr-11
Bigo 13-Apr-11
dire wolf 13-Apr-11
ROGUE 1 13-Apr-11
JusPassin 13-Apr-11
Quiet Man 13-Apr-11
dire wolf 14-Apr-11
dire wolf 14-Apr-11
Bridget Bordaux 14-Apr-11
Aeronut 14-Apr-11
Aeronut 14-Apr-11
4nolz@work 14-Apr-11
JWhite 15-Apr-11
dire wolf 15-Apr-11
JWhite 15-Apr-11
JWhite 15-Apr-11
dire wolf 15-Apr-11
JWhite 15-Apr-11
dire wolf 15-Apr-11
From: hawkeye Oh
Date: 13-Apr-11




what is the easiest most economical way to make a laminating oven?

From: Dick Wightman
Date: 13-Apr-11




There are numerous oven-alongs on the web. Mostly they are plywood, as my own is (www.dickwightman.con click on Traditiional Archery Activities). Plywood is the way to go if you are planning on making a number of bows. However, if you're just looking to make one or two for the experience, you can put an oven together with the blue insulating foam and duct tape. There are a couple of foam oven builds on-line, as well. If you're clever with the design, you can make it so that the ends have a tape hinge in the middle permitting the sides/ends to collapse. Then the sides/end unit can sit on the bottom piece and the top, with the light bulb board on it, can be set on top. Having a light, collapsible oven makes a lot of sense if you aren't going to be using it all the time. They take up a tremendous amount of space.

From: PaPa Doc
Date: 13-Apr-11




If you can find a shipping box from a parts place or bodyshop you can be half way there!

From: Hal9000
Date: 13-Apr-11




Find some old hollow core interior doors, rip to panels the size you want, keeps it a little lighter. Some Home stores have a section with damaged doors you can buy for as little as $1. Line the inside with foil/foam and it will cover the damaged part.

When you rip to size, one edge will not be solid, simply push the card board in enough to slide a small board in and screw in place.

The ends of the heat box can be of plywood or solid wood, so you can securely install handles to carry it if you want.

your pal Hal

From: Bigo
Date: 13-Apr-11




I 've made one with 1 inch foam coverd with foil. I cutted panel to the good size and assemble the pieces with masking tape.

that was surprisingly strong and easy to do. the top was a removable plywood panel with light bulb mounted on it.

no hinges and easy to modify.

max

From: dire wolf
Date: 13-Apr-11




Hawkeye, I assume this is to heat cure a laminated bow build upand accomodate a bow press? First question is HOW many bows ya think you'll laminate up in a year..??

Second question( and I suspect the number of bows will be less than ten) is why not just use a good 2 part industrial epoxy that cures right at 70F in 24 hours or so? ( not smooth on) Beats having a coffin size box laying around and dealing with installing and control of thermostatically controlled heat sources .. Ask me..I got answers..Jim

From: ROGUE 1 Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 13-Apr-11




You said it dire, I made one a few years ago, made one take down recurve....and there it sits!

Anyone looking for a Longbow/Recurve Laminating Oven cheap?? Maybe I,ll put it on Flee-bay..... Sure would like to get it out of the basement!

Hawkeye, to bad you don,t live closer to me, although, I do hunt Ohio every fall...........

From: JusPassin Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 13-Apr-11




I know an old bowyer who made and sold over 300 bows and used nothing more than cardboard nailed around the underside of his workbench with a couple of light bulbs in it. It doesn't have to cost you anything.

From: Quiet Man
Date: 13-Apr-11




I have seen a piece of stove pipe and a heat gun used. I use my attic in the summer time.

From: dire wolf
Date: 14-Apr-11




Hawkeye, Here's a link to the epoxy I have used successfully for over 20 years. Non critical( and variable if needed) 2:1 mix.Cleans up with water and soap before curing. The Tech Spec sheets are very precise with every spec for tensile, flexural need far surpassing what anyone will ever need for bow making.

Can be heat accelearated for cure or dries-cures at 70F in 25 hours or so to the same spec. Good stuff. G-2 made by Industrial Formulators Ltd, BC. Link is to a boatbuilding supply house stateside.

http://www.noahsboatbuilding.com/noahusa/itemdesc.asp?ic=G21%2E5Q&eq=&Tp=

I have put my press in the family room in wintertime, or as another poster said, in a closed car in summer for a bit of accelerated cure.Jim

From: dire wolf
Date: 14-Apr-11




As a practical note or two for the home crafter of laminated bows etc: Just prior to buttering up glas and riserwood and lams,( after wipe down) heat the components with a 750 watt hair dryer..or if you have one, a heat gun like Graingers sells.

Heat the bow press to 70F or more also IF assembling in a colder workshop in colder months. Otherwise, the cold components and press act as a heat sink and it'll take longer to cure well even IF you drag the press into your heated room for the cure up.

I like to have ALL components gravitate to a 70F minumum temp and relative hunidity that is 35-45% so there's no excess moisture in the lams or riser wood components. A RH od 35-45% equates to about 9-12% moisture content over time depending on the dimensional thickness and 'wetness'of the wood.

An open ended cardboard box with the heat source-air directed into one end usually will do this in a short amount of time.

DON'T leave anything unattended when applying heat in this fashion..even lightbulb boxes can generate more heat in a closed space than one thinks..UNLESS you set up a system with a good thermostat( bulb type) that will cycle heat source on and off reliably..Jim

From: Bridget Bordaux
Date: 14-Apr-11




MY father has used a hot car in the sumer and the house atick when there was no room in the bow oven

From: Aeronut
Date: 14-Apr-11




I made mine out of 1/2" foil backed foam insulation seven years ago and it is still going strong. Just used it a couple of weeks ago. Lightweight and easy to move aro9und if I need to and cheaper to build since I didn't need to buy plywood.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v511/aeronut/?action=view¤t=Hotbox.jpg

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v511/aeronut/?action=view¤t=Lightmounts.jpg

Dennis

From: Aeronut
Date: 14-Apr-11




This picture shows the 3/4" X 3/4" strips along the corners that I screwed the foam to.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v511/aeronut/Curly%20Hickory%20Bow/?action=view¤t=DSC04394-1.jpg

Dennis

From: 4nolz@work
Date: 14-Apr-11




if I was to do it over I'd buy heat strips instead of using an oven.

From: JWhite
Date: 15-Apr-11




dire wolf,

I checked out the G2 site you posted. Thanks for that. Given the container (squeeze bottle), I'd conclude it's viscosity is considerably lower than S.O.. Trying to squeeze SO through a bottle would not be pretty.

True? If so, then I could see, perhaps, using less glue per bow. That would be good, because it appears a bit pricey. If I hadn't just bought another qt of SO, I'd give it a try immediately.

From: dire wolf
Date: 15-Apr-11




JWhite, The G-2 comes in two parts.The resin flows like King syrup and the hardened flows much slower.

I usually put both plastic containers in a sink full of 200F hot water for a few minutes to warm the components up for mixing.

That liter of glue will do about TEN pretty complex multi component laminated bows.

They make smaller sized component packageing.

The shelf life if sealed tight and left in a not too hot pace is over two years after opening.. Most homecrafter smix & use way too much epoxy for bow builds..and 80% of it squeezes out and gets wiped up.

Butter both surfaces to be glued up but you won't need a lot of epoxy mix. I spread the epoxy mix with a small wooden spatula but a tongue depressor is about the right size. A half cup of mixed epoxy will glue up about any bow.

One valueable thing about the G-2 aside from tensile, flexural and shear strength is it washes up-off with hot water and soap.

So during and after the glue up.tools, hands, etc can be cleaned far easier than most epoxies that require an acetone washup. Great for oily tropical hardwoods..I think I can glue up two oily ball bearings with the stuff..:) I have also used it to make a fillerof wood dust for pin knots in wooden bows..Added dye for filling holes in fibergals older bows where sights once were attached..Arrow footings..Knife scales..etc. Jim

From: JWhite
Date: 15-Apr-11




dire,

Your observation regarding homecrafters using too much glue would certainly apply to me. A fiberglass sandwich bow with 3 wood core lams means 8 full length surfaces (plus the riser) to slather. Doing that with 1/2 cup is currently outside of my skill-set.

In my fist bow, I distinctly remember running out of glue about 1/2 way through the glue up. This after mixing a tuna fish can sized (6 oz) quantity.

Then again, I am the sort that cannot approach any painting, plastering, tiling, etc job without getting myself completely immersed in the project. ;)

From: JWhite
Date: 15-Apr-11




From: dire wolf
Date: 15-Apr-11

dire wolf's embedded Photo



JWhite, Well one can always make a second batch if he runs short during the glue up..:)

G-2 and most epoxies require about a 5 minute mixing up regimen and then you are good to slather the stuff on the next components..:)

Looking back, HOW much of your epoxy ran out and down the press-form and wasn't used for the actual glueing? If you are like me and most, over half of it..:)Jim Here's a pic of one of my own presses..Note there's a LOT of epoxy dried on it down on the board that the press is built on..:)Jim

From: JWhite
Date: 15-Apr-11




I lose a lot of glue in the press. You might have sparked an idea, though. My workshop is located in my basement, and even with the wood stove on, my 'glue up' space is on the cool side. S.O. is VERY thick in my environment. If I can keep it warmer/thinner during the glue-up, I may be able to spread it thinner and use less.

I'll give it a try.

Nice press. You are a rubber band-er ?

From: dire wolf
Date: 15-Apr-11

dire wolf's embedded Photo



Yep..Bicycle inner tubes 1" wide and about 40" long.. Wrap back & forth using those steel pegs. WARMING the components prior to mixing and warming the lam components & press does help.

As a not, I made a bendmeter..which is a dial indicator & plunger affair on a 6" bridge so I could true the steel form up perfectly for upper and lower limbs.And the press is plane-true as well. Press looks like a bridge ..:)Jim





If you have already registered, please

sign in now

For new registrations

Click Here




Visit Bowsite.com A Traditional Archery Community Become a Sponsor
Stickbow.com © 2003. By using this site you agree to our Terms and Conditions and our Privacy Policy