Traditional Archery Discussions on the Leatherwall


THE BILL STEWART STORY

Messages posted to thread:
Bubbajum 24-Nov-04
Brent 24-Nov-04
Paintedsticks 24-Nov-04
Scott G. 24-Nov-04
Bubbajum 24-Nov-04
JimPic 24-Nov-04
Rancher 24-Nov-04
Scott in WA 24-Nov-04
Sleeps with elk 24-Nov-04
Bubbajum 24-Nov-04
johnnyrazorhead 25-Nov-04
FOREST ARCHER 30-Dec-08
oberon 30-Dec-08
Aspirinbuster 30-Dec-08
Navan-James 30-Dec-08
backstrap 30-Dec-08
gradog1 30-Dec-08
psushchyk 30-Dec-08
jipp 30-Dec-08
Liquid Amber 30-Dec-08
Stealth2 30-Dec-08
Gaur 30-Dec-08
Gaur 31-Dec-08
backstrap 31-Dec-08
Hornhunter7 31-Dec-08
traxx 31-Dec-08
Rovingarcher 31-Dec-08
bushytail 31-Dec-08
gradog1 31-Dec-08
Wudstix 31-Dec-08
larry hatfield 31-Dec-08
Stealth2 31-Dec-08
Hornhunter7 31-Dec-08
jipp 31-Dec-08
Raymo 31-Dec-08
David Alford 31-Dec-08
Painted sticks 31-Dec-08
Navan-James 29-Mar-12
Navan-James 29-Mar-12
cch 29-Mar-12
George Tsoukalas 29-Mar-12
RHood 29-Mar-12
Blackhawk 29-Mar-12
cch 29-Mar-12
Rondo 29-Mar-12
Navan-James 04-Apr-12
Stealth2 05-Apr-12
Stealth2 05-Apr-12
dire wolf 05-Apr-12
AZBEAR 07-Apr-12
From: Bubbajum
Date: 24-Nov-04




Thought that some of you might find this interesting.

If you own one of his bows tell us about it.

I am very new to trad archery (compound for years) to me his bows look like a dream bow, but being a green horn I might be wrong.

http://www.w4wc.org/bill_stewart/home.htm

'THE BILL STEWART STORY' By Dan Bihary

Most of those that hunt with a bow and many that haven't know of Fred Bear. He is one of archery's legends and is responsible for making it affordable and available to everyone. He helped bring archery from the Pope and Young era, to present day technology and popularity. There have been others like Howard Hill, Ben Pearson and Glenn St Charles, along with some present day individuals, which have helped mold archery and bow hunting into what is today. Many are gone, but their passion for bows and the legacy they've left, lives on through the aid of many who worked behind the scenes to help make these individuals into who they are.

Another unknown bowyer that helped shape archery into what it is today, is Bill Stewart. He's one who worked behind the scenes with Fred Bear and many others to innovate, engineer and redesign the bow manufacturing processes of today. Bill Stewart became not only a friend of Fred Bear but was sought out by and worked for him many years. Bill not only redesigned Fred's manufacturing plant in Michigan, but also most of his bows. He made them more accurate and easier to shoot. He did the same for other bowyer's like Damon Howatt [his bows now made by Martin Archery], Duke Savora, and Bob Lee of Bob Lee Archery [then Wing Archery]. Bill is a master skilled craftsman, developer and innovator, working over70 years in the trade. Now 83, he still makes bows at his home shop in Yakima, Washington. Bill stated that Fred did more for bows and hunting than anyone ever has. He is a humble man who gives credit to and has helped many others to become some of archery's great hero's.

Born William R. Stewart on March 9.1920 in Hanesville, Louisiana, he was raised by a southern "mammy" until 4 years old. His family then moved to Texas where he helped his father for 7 years and learned many of his skills. In 1937 they relocated to Yakima where he continued to work for his dad who was a building contractor. At 13, he made his first bow, and in 1937 at 17 he met Damon Howatt. Howatt introduced Stewart to Pop Prouty from Portland, Oregon who was a fine bowyer and archer that had his own business. Pop explained to Bill, how to make a self long bow and re-curve. Bill bought his first pair of yew wood billets and later turned them into finished bows that he continued to shoot for many years to come.

He then attended welding school and got a job on an air base in Ketchikan, Alaska where he ran a welding shop. During WWII, he joined the service and worked in a special shop battalion assembling LCM's [amphibious landing craft].

Returning home to Yakima after the war, he worked another 4 years welding and was hired by Damon Howatt for 7 years. Bill saw where he could help him make the bow process simpler and more efficient. He redesigned Damon's plant and bow manufacturing equipment. Building new bow presses, his pneumatic strip-heated design was his own, an industry innovation and a standard for today's traditional machines. While with Howatt, Bill designed the Eldorado, Diablo and Howatt Hunter bows for Damon. Martin Archery in Walla Walla, Washington Walla Walla, Washington is still manufacturing some of Bill's creations.

Bill was then hired by Fred Bear and worked for him 14 years. Together they co-designed many long bows, re-curve bows and compounds. Bill worked in research and development at Bear Archery with Bob Remich, brother of Margaret St Charles [wife of Glenn St Charles]. Bill said, " Bob was the genius who was responsible for many of Fred's innovations developing the first compound bow cam's." Together in the 1960's, Stewart and Remich developed the 'Delta V', an innovative compound that shot a blistering 230 feet per second which was quite a feet for that time. It was made of a one-piece die-cast magnesium riser initially costing $270,000 to form. Bill said, "it was not only one of the most expensive, but also noisiest bows ever made, making a sound like a beaver slapping it's tail on the water when released." Bill and Bob won a design award from American Metal Magazine in "81 for their achievement in injection molding a one-piece riser that was displayed at Bear Archery. Bill Stewart also designed the Bear Magnum, which was Fred's lightest bow. Weighing an amazing 14 ounces, it shot very well and was made for the traveling archer; Bill won another award for this bow. Bob Remich told a story where Fred had a group meeting about a problem he was having with a wood riser [handle] for one of his compounds. Bill worked tirelessly over a weekend, and in less than two days came to the following Mondays meeting with 6 distinctively different risers that were works of art. Bob claims that "Stewart was the real genius"!

Bill also designed two new bows for Bear, the Tamerlane, a target re-curve and the Hunter, which Fred used on his hunts to Africa. Another of Bill's achievements was the co-design of the Fred Bear take down re-curve hunting bow. It had a latching limb device that was Fred's, but the bow was Bill's. It was a work of art that included a commemorative wooden matching set, with 24 karat gold hardware on the bow and case. At that time this collector's piece sold for $1000 and Bill received the original #1. Another #1 was created for sale to the public, but Bill still retains his.

After 7 years, Stewart left Bear Archery for a job with Bob Lee, then of Wing Archery. He was bow designer and production specialist who also redesigned some of Bob Lee's bows and manufacturing processes. Bill co-designed the Red Wing Hunter, White Wing and Presentation II, a target take down bow. Bob Remich said, "wherever Bill went, good things happened. He was always a pleasure to be around and everyone loved working with him." Bob Remich told me where Bill could easily turn things around in his mind and understand the most complicated problems completely. He would immediately go to work on them, solving what would take an above average person days or even weeks to accomplish. He said, "Bill was amazing and there was nothing he couldn't do."

Later Bill went back to Bear for 7 more years. Bill was a good friend of Fred and they hunted together in Grouse Haven, Michigan for white tailed deer. While at Bear Archery, Bill re-designed the Grizzly, Kodiak Super Magnum, Alaskan, Polar Bear and other compounds. Fred then sold Bear Archery and Bill moved back to Yakima where he worked for Duke Savora for a year. Bill Stewart's genius has helped so many bow makers become successful, yet he has remained virtually unknown by the archery community.

With his vast bow making knowledge and achievements, Bill decided it was time to make his own creations. He set out making his patented trade mark of unique individual design, the Bill Stewart "Multi-Cam" signature bows. This was another beautiful self-composition of wood, fiber glass and resin which has his patented 'wavy-limb' design. It is what sets his work apart from all other bowyers. Fred Bear told Bill that this bow would never sell, but little did he know that his multi-cam bow is one of the best-kept secrets around.

Bill states, "the multi-cam limbs are smoother, more stable, faster and far superior than traditional limbs." He also says "they don't stack, they eliminate recoil and limb twist which damages most bows."

Norb Mullaney, bow technician and writer for BOWHUNTING WORLD magazine, wrote a report in the June '98 edition on Bill's Slim-Line multi-cam take-down bow. Norb said, "the bow tested rivals a good re-curve when it comes to recoil shock". The bow shot 192.8 feet per second was 56 pounds at 28 inches of draw length and 62 inches long.

Bill's creations range from 52 to 70 inches long, depending on the riser [handle] and type of bow. In my opinion, his bows shoot as smooth as silk and are astounding works of art. Once you've shot one, you're other bows will tend to gather dust. I personally prefer his take down models for two reasons. One can purchase an additional set of limbs and save the cost buying two bows by 1/3. I practice with 50# limbs where I can sling many arrows with little muscle fatigue, while not sacrificing form. Then I can change to heavier hunting weight limbs after my muscles have had time to build. This is a tremendous advantage for older bodies that have succumbed to repeated injury. His risers are cut for complete center shot, where the handle is cut past center of the bow string, to allow for arrow shaft and vane clearance.

I had the good fortune of winning one of Bill's creations in a raffle drawing. Bill has continued to be very gracious over the years donating in support of the bow hunting community. During the '97 late archery season, I made Bill's acquaintance through a chance encounter while he was traveling past my hunting camp. I was in the process of cooking dinner when he decided to turn around due to icy road conditions. He backed his van up and called out the window asking if I had done any good? I replied, I wished. While talking at some distance I decided to ask him to join me for dinner. He stated his wife would be sore if he did. After a few minutes I asked his name with him replying "Bill Stewart". Do you by any chance make bows? He said he'd made a couple. Astonished, I replied, I won one of your bows, and we stood in the middle of the icy road, talking about bows and hunting, while the sun set and my dinner overcooked. I was very impressed by this real down-to-earth gentleman who showed me his wares, like a traveling salesman. Later Bill invited me to his home in Yakima to tour his bow making facility.

The last day of the season, I resolved it a bust and headed for the grand tour. I met him at the door and he showed me around his shop while we drank coffee and talked about his bow making past. I found he had designed and built most of the machines he used. It was a small garage turned into a working shop that was full of his past and present creations. One of the tools was a lamination sander that milled thin wood slivers to within one thousandth of an inch. He also made handle sanders, his bow presses along with many other machines. It was quite a sight to see everything worked so tightly into a small one-man shop. I have learned of his immeasurable accomplishments through his acquaintances and friends.

Bill's personal preferences are long bows and re-curves, due to the need for experience and hand-work. He feels that compounds have been good for archery. "I don't believe we would have as many archers today if it hadn't been for compound bows. However, many of those compound shooters are going back traditional equipment, which is a healthy sign." Compounds are much more adaptable to high production, larger plants and expensive equipment on a production line.

I asked him what he thought were the best innovations to come along in the last 30 years to help bow makers? He answered, "fiberglass, epoxy glue, new string material and better bow designs." I also asked what was one of the greatest problems facing archery today and what the future would look like? He said, "anti groups are trying to stop all hunting and I feel that all archers [traditional and compound shooters] must stick together. After all it's all archery!"

Bill Stewart is the one of the select few, ultimate inventor-craftsmen and master of many trades. He has had a wonderful life with little acclaim and few rewards. He retains a meek life style and resolves on handing his business down to his son Allen who lives locally. For those that haven't had the opportunity to shoot or purchase one of Bill's beautiful creations, I encourage you to do it soon. He resides with his lovely wife Kathryn and can be reached by mailing to:

Mr. Bill Stewart 3701 Gun Club Road #42 Yakima, WA 98901 [509] 457-8047 FAX [509] 576-8946

He manufactures over 6 different bows with various choices of risers, grips and limbs in maple, yew and other exotic woods. His bows are decisively distinctive and functional works of art. Ask for a brochure.

From: Brent
Date: 24-Nov-04




Thanks for passing on this story. It's a great story about a great man. I have one of his bows and met with him in his shop, and can attest to all that has been said in this most excellent article. Now if only Trad Bowhunter would reprint it, as a sort of eulogy, since Bill died a year or so ago.

From: Paintedsticks
Date: 24-Nov-04




Great bows from a great man

From: Scott G.
Date: 24-Nov-04




I've got a 62" 58@28" Bill Stewart Multi-cam TD with Yew limbs.  The bow is fast and stable and very nice to shoot.  It is kind of plain jain when compared to the works of art many bowyers are making now, but it is just fine by me.

From: Bubbajum
Date: 24-Nov-04




Scott G.

How fast is it?

Also when you say stable what does that mean...when I said I was very new I ment it, shot my first recurve last Saterday at a shoot in SW PA. I am realy thinking about switching to traditional.

From: JimPic
Date: 24-Nov-04




I have a 56" 55@27" Bill Stewart Multi-Cam T/D w/yew limbs and a real nice 14" laminated riser.Like Scott said-it's fast,not shocky,has a real nice grip and it put's 'em where you're looking.

From: Rancher
Date: 24-Nov-04




I have a 60" MTC 3 piece TD 56lbs @ 26". It has the longbow limbs. Its a great shooter and shoots an arrow hard. Most cant beleive its only 56lbs the way it drives an arrow into the target and the speed it gets there. I talked to Bill on the phone when picking out the bow. He seemed full of life. Wish I could have met him in person. I bet he could tell some great stories with all the archery he was involved with. I dont see his ad in TBM anymore. I also hope they would do a story on him with some pictures.

From: Scott in WA
Date: 24-Nov-04




Bubbajum,

Speed? I have no idea. I've never chronoe'd it. But I have shot it next to Widow's, Brack's, Wallaces, Blacktails, Cascade (chekmate), and it was easily as fast as those of equivalent weight and arrow size.

Stability? To me is one of those subjective things. The bow just feels good. The draw on those yew limbs is buttery smooth and the bow just sits in your hand at release with no jumping or limb vibration. Hard to describe other than it just feels good.

From: Sleeps with elk
Date: 24-Nov-04




Yep when Bill passed we lost a true legend of archery that never recieved the recognition he deserved. I contacted TBM a few years ago and inquired as to why an interview had never been done. TJ answered me and said that they had it in the works but obviously he passed away before they got to it. Darn shame. I have one of his bows and two sets of limbs that I'd never part with. He was a heck of a guy to sit down and visit with.

From: Bubbajum
Date: 24-Nov-04




I would like to thank all who have answered my questions, commented on there Stewart Bows and the kind words about the man.

I did not know that he had passed away until someone made mention of it in this thread. I think the world of archery has lost a unsung hero. Maybe TBM will do a life story about Bill?

I hope to put one of Bills bows in my hand someday and let a few fly. I cant afford to buy one right now...well if I sold all of my compound equipment I could, but being so new to traditional archery I don't think that would be wise investment. I am going to start out small or should I say inexpensive and hopefully progress onto better bows, like a Stewart.

From: johnnyrazorhead
Date: 25-Nov-04




I know a gentleman that worked in the research and develoement dept. at Bear with Bill.This man is remarkably talented himself but he has told me several times how brilliant Bill Stewart was and how much he enjoyed working with him.He also told me of some not so sharp guys he had the pleasure of working with at Bear too,but I never heard anything but good things from him about Bill.Coming from him that is a real compliment to the man.

From: FOREST ARCHER
Date: 30-Dec-08




TTT for a good read ......... Archer

From: oberon
Date: 30-Dec-08




Any photos of his bows? Oberon

From: Aspirinbuster
Date: 30-Dec-08




Great post. Thanks Frank Addington, Jr.

From: Navan-James
Date: 30-Dec-08




Good post, I learned something.

NJ

From: backstrap
Date: 30-Dec-08




Bubbajum, thank you for the story! until this year, i was a compound shooter. i bought a howatt hunter this year, and i love it. its cool to know Mr. Stewart had a hand in designing it!

by the way, i got my first trad kill with that bow this year. a 60# doe, and i was as excited as i was the first deer i killed. what a feeling! thanks again -backstrap-

From: gradog1
Date: 30-Dec-08

gradog1's embedded Photo



I bought my M/C takedown in 1985. 53# @28" with yew limbs. My draw with this bow is 27". with a 500 grn wood arrow she gets 187 fps. In 1987 I was lucky enough to pick up another set of limbs, 45# @28". I have taken a lot of deer with both sets of limbs and though the bow has lots of scratches and dings I love it. Buy the way, when I called Bill to tell him the check for the bow was on the way he mailed the bow the same day. BEFORE HE HAD THE MONEY!!

From: psushchyk
Date: 30-Dec-08

psushchyk's embedded Photo



Here is a picture of a 60" Multi-cam that I owned. Nice shooting bow.

From: jipp
Date: 30-Dec-08




i lived near yakima for a few years i went to collge in WA.

wish i would of been into sticks then i would of liked to of met hatfeild and bill.

chris.

From: Liquid Amber Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 30-Dec-08




Bill was born in Haynesville [not Hanesville], Louisiana...in fact I was in Haynesville this afternoon. Before his death I contacted Bill about his birthplace and he acknowledged it had been mis-spelled in the bio. sketch and in fact was Haynesville, a small town just south of the Arkansas line.

Doug Walker published an interview with Bill in his National Bowhunter in 1998.

From: Stealth2 Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 30-Dec-08




When I was writing for Doug Walkers Western Bowhunter, I did a bow test on the Multi-Cam. When I spoke with Bill about testing he was all for it. I told Bill I only shoot traditional and would be able to test out the bow for my article when I got back from my colorado elk hunt.

Three days later I received a package from Bill..a beautiful T/D,black glass, gray riser. His note read "here, take this to Colorado with you and hunt with it, Good luck Bill." The bow was a few pounds lighter than my bow but I did use it. Even let Judd Cooney run a few arrows out of it. Real sweet bow....

Two months after I put the bow through my testing and wrote my article, I sent the bow back to Bill along with my article. He was good man to deal with and had me on the phone over an hour talking about his early days with Bear Archery. Three months went by and another package arrived. A real beautiful Multi-Cam bow with Yew under clear glass, 56" 60# with a light maple riser. The note..."Thanks for the article and kind words. Five customers called and ordered bows after reading your article. Accept this bow as a gift...Bill."

I took many deer and one bear with that bow. The last animal taken was a P&Y Antelope. I'll post the pic tomorrow. When Bill passed, I retired the bow and only take it as a backup on my annual hunting trips. Good man...good bowyer....great bow.

From: Gaur
Date: 30-Dec-08

Gaur's embedded Photo



here's the multi cam I posted on the other thread. Nice to read the history behind a great bowyer.

From: Gaur
Date: 31-Dec-08

Gaur's embedded Photo



From: backstrap
Date: 31-Dec-08




stealth2-sounds like i'd take that bow with me to the woods every time! sounds like a killin machine to me.

bet he'd get a smile on his face every time you harvested an animal with it!

thanks for the thread -backstrap-

From: Hornhunter7
Date: 31-Dec-08




Bill built several bows for me over the years and all of them were great shooters. He shipped a couple of them to me and they arrived in less than two weeks after ordering. I only lived a few hours away from him so I found my way to his shop several times. He was a wealth of knowledge and I enjoyed each visit, usually hanging around all day. Bill could be very opionated about certain things when it came to building bows and wasn't afraid to say so. I liked that about him. Bill really enjoyed building traditional bows but if someone came in his shop looking for a compound he could build that too. On one of my last visits he showed me a riser for a recurve that he said he built in his spare time. It was what you would call a true center shot as the center of the riser was hollowed out and the arrow was shot right through the middle of the riser. I'd never seen anything like it before. The last bow he sent me through the mail had a nice letter attached. The letter informed me that the riser he had made me was the very first actionwood combination yew wood riser he had ever built and to let him know how I liked it. There was also no charge. Needless to say I still have it. I like several others never did think Bill got the recognition he deserved. A wealth of knowledge left the archery world when Bill passed. HH7

From: traxx
Date: 31-Dec-08




Great story there.I learned a bunch i probly wouldnt have known otherwise.Ill be honest,I saw a bow of that design on Ebay,some time Back.I was thinkin,What a dumb####,hes tryin to sell a bow with screwed up limbs.LOLWhos the Dumb#### now?LOL

From: Rovingarcher
Date: 31-Dec-08




TJ couldn't be bothered taking the time writting about Bill.TJ Lived in Vashon Island Washington with his wife for many years,before moving to Idaho.Many of his articles include well known bowyers.For reasons unknown, he could never give Bill the time of day.I only remember one time TJ could put himself out to attend a Washington Bowhunter function, or a trad shoot.Not that this makes him a bad guy, just makes one wonder what makes him tick.Bill on the other hand has attended many of our functions, as Dan stated, also donated many bows for our WSB auctions.GR

From: bushytail Compton's Traditional Bowhunters
Date: 31-Dec-08




I also seen limb designs like that at a trad shoot a couple of years ago.Didn`t talk to the guy.I was looking at what all the vendors had.He had about three of them for sell.This was in PA.

From: gradog1
Date: 31-Dec-08




For you older guys you may remember that in the late 60s bill had an add in the archery magazines that simply read Bill Stewart Bows $39.95.

From: Wudstix Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 31-Dec-08




Great thread and super article. I printed and will read it over. Good history.

From: larry hatfield
Date: 31-Dec-08




don't want to burst too many bubbles but there are a few things i should point out. bill had been gone from howatts for some time before the palomar and hunter were developed. earl silvers and don jewett, under the direction of damon, were responsible for those two designs. the hunter we make today was redesigned in 1960. the first hunter was the mamba hunter in 1955, made after bill left howatts. he did build presses for damon, and a feather splitting and sanding machine that was state of the art then and now. he also designed and built bows of his own design before and after he left damon. he was definately an innovator, skilled craftsman, engineer, and a great human being. i knew him from 1954 until his death.

From: Stealth2 Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 31-Dec-08

Stealth2's embedded Photo



1993 Wyoming Antelope with the Stewart Multi Cam bow. Cedar arrows, Zwickey Eskimos...25 yd shot at waterhole. Complete passthru, animal went maybe 75 yds before falling over.

From: Hornhunter7
Date: 31-Dec-08




A little humorous story about Bills limb design as told to me by a friend, who has used Bill's bows ever since he came out with them. This friend said he was hunting elk in September one Fall when he decided to take a break about mid-day. He leaned his Stewart bow up against a tree and sat down. Shortly afterwards he spotted another hunter carrying a compound coming his way. This hunter walked up to him and they started to visit. My friend said he noticed the guy kept looking at his bow. Finally the other guy said "so what kinda bow is that?" My friend says "a Stewart recurve." The other guy says "you hunt with that?" My friend politely says "yes." The other hunter asks if he could look at it. My friend says "sure." The other hunter picks it up and asks my friend if he knew his limbs had a wobble in them. My friend says "yes, that happened when I ran over it with my truck." The guy says " and you can still shoot it?" My friend says " yes, it shoots great, ya wanna try it?" "Oh no thanks" he replied. He set the bow back down and after a few minutes walked away. I always wondered what he told his friends. HH7

From: jipp
Date: 31-Dec-08




thats a funny story indeed horn.

chris.

From: Raymo
Date: 31-Dec-08




I have seen a couple of these bows, including one with the thum hole. Didn't know what they were. Now I am sorry to have passed them up.....

From: David Alford
Date: 31-Dec-08




A ton more of his bows would have been sold if the public knew about all this. I had his brochure years ago and wasn't sold. Many bowyers today send out plain and simple brochures...the ingredients to get prospective customers to buy takes a bit more. Anyway, I think Bill Stewart lives on in a way as long as traditional archery does...

From: Painted sticks
Date: 31-Dec-08




If you ever see one under 600 buy it...PR

From: Navan-James
Date: 29-Mar-12




TTT

From: Navan-James
Date: 29-Mar-12




Are bows to Bill's design still being made by his son, does any one know if this is true and if so how do you contact him?

Regards, James.

From: cch
Date: 29-Mar-12




I don't think anyone is building them anymore. Martin Archery bought all of the forms a while ago. I don't know what they have planned for them. The closest thing I have seen to his limbs are being sold at Black Swan.

From: George Tsoukalas
Date: 29-Mar-12




Thanks. I don't know how I missed this. May his memory be eternal. George

From: RHood
Date: 29-Mar-12




I believe that presently, the only bows that have similar limbs are the Wapiti bows made by Keith Chastain who further refined the limbs by using the "Eicholtz hook" (an extreme fish hook shape to the recurved ends).

Bows made with these style limbs have always been very smooth drawing and very fast.

From: Blackhawk Professional Bowhunters Society - Associate Member
Date: 29-Mar-12




Roy Coursey of Cook Mountain bows was making the Bill Stewart multicam bows. Roy is a fine bowyer who worked under/with Bill Stewart in years past.

From: cch
Date: 29-Mar-12




I forgot about Roy.

From: Rondo
Date: 29-Mar-12




Bill told me a story once about a bow he had built that was in a museum in europe. that was some years ago and I wish I could remember the details. A funny thing I remember about him was when he made me a riser. I went to his shop and he was grinding away shaping it up. He would ask "how does this feel now"? I would hold it and had him take some more off here and there. This went on for awhile and I thought I'd play around and I said "Bill I think you took to much off here." He almost hit the cieling until I started laughing. He was a great guy and I really enjoyed his stories. I'll never part with my bow and two and sets of limbs he made me.

From: Navan-James
Date: 04-Apr-12

Navan-James's embedded Photo



Well my new-to-me Bill Stewart multi cam takedown arrived yesterday from Louisiana! Thank you Jeff!

The riser looks like it just left the workshop a week ago after being finished by the bowyer, it seems to be in perfect condition. The limbs look very good as well.

No string thought so I just ordered a new 60" Dacron string this morning.

The bow is 64" AMO and is labelled as 58# @ 28".

Any advice on the correct brace height that I need with this bow? Also, I plan on shooting it with an elevated rest, probably a Bear Weather-Rest.

Any thoughts on arrow setup? My draw length is a tad just under 27". I've got a bunch of 3555 GT shafts lying around here that I'd like to use.

Also, Bill's website states that thee bows are cut 1/4" past centre, mine is a 1984 model; I wonder if that hold true for those older bows?

Regards, James.

From: Stealth2 Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 05-Apr-12

Stealth2's embedded Photo



I had the riser darkened....

From: Stealth2 Professional Bowhunters Society - Qualified Member
Date: 05-Apr-12

Stealth2's embedded Photo



This was a gift from Bill, a bow I'll never get rid of. I bow tested a similar model and reported my results in Western Bowhunter. Yew limbs under clear glass...maple riser...this bow took some nice whitetails, a good mulie and that antelope a few threads up....

From: dire wolf
Date: 05-Apr-12




Great memoirs about a man who contributed much to archery. I remember when his 'multi cam' bows came out..Never did appeal to me tho..Jim

From: AZBEAR
Date: 07-Apr-12




I was at a local shop here and saw a Bill Stewart L/B with those crazy looking limbs on it. The bow was made i belive in 1990 ??? I was going to give her a shot but the bow was left handed. I had never seen one of his L/Bs before ....AzBear





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